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Aliens in the Promised Land: Why Minority Leadership Is Overlooked in White Christian Churches and Institutions Paperback – May 6, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: P & R Publishing (May 6, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596382341
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596382343
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #784,026 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This is a terrific book. For years evangelicals have discussed among themselves ways to reach minority communities, without much participation from minorities themselves. This book is a game changer. Here, black, Asian, and Latino writers say what they most want to say to the evangelical (and specifically Reformed) community. If you are tired of the usual arguments about race, as I am, this book will wake you up with some new ideas, such as Lance Lewis s suggestion. He urges a moratorium on evangelicals' (even black evangelicals') planting churches directed toward blacks. I m not sure I agree. But like many ideas in this book, Lewis s are clearly written and backed up by good arguments. That a Reformed publisher has undertaken to publish a book like this is itself a very promising development. I urge everyone to read this book who is seeking to carry out Jesus Great Commission. --Dr. John Frame, Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando

About the Author

Anthony Bradley, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Theology and Ethics at The King's College in New York City and serves as a Research Fellow at the Acton Institute.  Dr. Bradley holds a B.S. in biological sciences from Clemson University, an M.Div. from Covenant Theological Seminary, an M.A. in Ethics and Society from Fordham University, and a Ph.D. from Westminster Theological Seminary.

More About the Author

Anthony B. Bradley, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Theology and Ethics at The King's College in New York City and serves as a Research Fellow at the Acton Institute. Dr. Bradley lectures at colleges, universities, business organizations, conferences, and churches throughout the U.S. and abroad. He is the author of Liberating Black Theology: The Bible and the Black Experience in America; Black and Tired: Essays on Race, Politics, Culture, and International Development; The Political Economy of Liberation: Thomas Sowell and James Cone on the Black Experience; and editor of Keep Your Head Up: America's New Black Christian Leaders, Social Consciousness, and the Cosby Conversation. His writings on religious and cultural issues have been published in a variety of journals, including: the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Detroit News, and World Magazine.

Dr. Bradley is called upon by members of the broadcast media for comment on current issues and has appeared on NPR, CNN/Headline News, Fox News and Court TV Radio, among others. He studies and writes on issues of race in America, hip hop, youth culture, issues among African Americans, the American family, welfare, education, and modern international forms of social injustice, slavery, and oppression. From 2005-2009, Dr. Bradley was Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology and Ethics at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, MO where he also directed the Francis A. Schaeffer Institute.

Dr. Bradley holds Bachelor of Science in biological sciences from Clemson University, a Master of Divinity from Covenant Theological Seminary, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Westminster Theological Seminary; and holds an M.A. in Ethics and Society from Fordham University.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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The book is, as I said above, exceptional.
Darian Burns
Through these biographies the reader connects with the contributor's experience.
Joseph T. Cochran
This shows us that racism can be found in any denomination and any race.
Roger Leonhardt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Roger Leonhardt on May 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
When I saw this book was going to be about Minorities, Race and the Church, I had a great desire to read it. There is a big need in dealing with racism today. Racism comes from the fall of man and should be repented of through Christ.

I am Reformed in belief, a Caucasian, and a member at a Multicultural church. My church is not reformed but is associated with the Southern Baptist. It has been one of the greatest experiences in my life to see people of different races and backgrounds worshiping the God who created us all. It is one of the closest things to heaven that we will see on earth. Heaven will consist of people from every tribe, nation, and tongue.

It is the greatest feeling in the world to know that no matter what color we are, we are one in Christ. It feels right, because it is right. I know that this is the desire God has for his Church - that we should be one, even as Jesus and the Father are one.

God's desire for us to be one, does not negate the fact that we are from different cultures. God doesn't want us to change those things that have no bearing on our Christian walk. God does not care what kind of music you like. It is not the beat that he is concerned about; It is your heart.

I was glad to see people of the reformed faith speaking out on this subject. In the past, many traditions were steeped in racism, including some in the Reformed Faith. Many have now repented and changed. We can not make up for what our ancestors did wrong, but we can live our lives today with love and integrity.

This book was a great read. It consists of pastors and theologians of different races and backgrounds. This shows us that racism can be found in any denomination and any race.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Darian Burns on January 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
Anthony Bradley is a thinker who likes to challenge and confront the status quo. I have always liked him. He and I graduated from the same seminary and I have kept up wit his work since. "Aliens in the Promised Land" is not by Bradley, it is edited by him and he does contribute. The book is a collection of essays by various ethnic minority evangelical authors. The chapters span a wide array of topics such as discipleship in urban contexts to theological education and everything in between. The nine chapters are devoted to hearing from the Black and Asian communities on the factors which are causing minorities to be not fully integrated within White churches and Christian institutions. The essays range from topics covering discipleship in urban contexts to theological education.

Over all the book is exceptional. Bradley gives us pastors and theologians of different races and backgrounds. He shows us that racism can be found in any denomination, church and race. He tackles an important subject while remaining balanced and thoughtful. Each chapter of the book shows issues needing to be recognized and addressed. The book is, as I said above, exceptional.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mathew Sims on June 17, 2013
Format: Paperback
Anthony Bradley has collected diverse voices to encourage, admonish, and instruct conservative evangelicals. We need diversity within the church and its seminaries. Bradley says,
This book represents my ongoing struggle to make sense of why evangelicalism struggles with diversity in church leadership and in the Christian academy. (p. 14)
The writing is a mixture of experiential knowledge and constructive criticism (used in the best possible sense). Especially penetrating was the observation that the evangelical stress on right doctrine hasn't always lead to "ethical emphases that resonated with" other cultures (p. 79). As a matter of fact, evangelicals over the last sixty to seventy years have purposeful shied away from ethical concerns for fear of falling prey to the "social gospel."

Also, I found the diverse voices challenged my own point of view and revealed blind spots in my own thinking. Harold Dean Trulear points out,
The evangelical struggle with race does not always reflect overt racism. Often the culprit is a form of benign neglect--an inability to see the particularity of white evangelical culture and its captivity to middle-class American norms. (p. 96)
His point boils down to this: white evangelicals haven't loved Christians from different cultures well. We've merged white culture with evangelicalism. We expect others to integrate into our churches without thought to their perspective or culture.

I loved the re-focusing from racial reconciliation to solidarity. Solidarity starts at the beginning with God creating us all in his image. It provides a foundation when reconciliation is necessary.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scott Rees on July 24, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Bradley has invited and collected a good range of writers and view in order to help churches and leaders enter a good discussion on how Christians can lead in race relations
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joseph T. Cochran on July 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
Eye-opening and piercing describes Aliens in the Promised Land. I grew up in the suburbs, the by-product of white flight. I learned, ate and played with my minority friends in school oblivious to the racism they faced. Nor did I understand how I played a part in racism either by commission or omission. Aliens in the Promised Land opened my eyes and re-colored my history in light of God's truth about racism, prejudice, and discrimination.

Eye's Opened

I've had a few dozen friendships with minorities throughout my life. Only in a few of them did we ever broach a substantive conversation about racial reconciliation. I think this is because both my minority friends and I assumed reconciliation.

Because we lacked dialogue, I underrated the prejudice those friends experienced. This is our fault.

In my white world, words like racism and prejudice are serious offenses. When I've seen injustice, I've been quick to substitute words like racism, prejudice, and discrimination for less gritty words: challenge, difficulty, and unfairness. Why have I done this? I live the idealistic white life, hopeful that people are more just and loving than reality. I pull the punch because of personal guilt.

Guilt Owned

Reading from Anthony Bradley's ensemble of contributors opened my eyes to my guilt. Bradley assembled a team of ethnic leaders and scholars to share personal stories of injustice experienced and offer a pathway forward in hope and healing. This book is a combination of biography and battle plan. Bradley asserts, "This book discusses the future of gospel-centered evangelicalism and its ability to reach diverse communities and raise up ethnic leaders who reflect the realities of global Christianity (Bradley, 25).
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