Aliens Of The Deep 2005 G CC

Amazon Instant Video

(45) IMDb 6.5/10
Available in HD

James Cameron teams up with NASA scientists to explore undersea life.

Starring:
James Cameron, Pamela Conrad
Runtime:
48 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

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Aliens Of The Deep

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director James Cameron, Steven Quale
Starring James Cameron, Pamela Conrad
Supporting actors Victor Nischeta, Pamela Conrad, Arthur 'Lonne' Lane, Jim Childress, Dijanna Figueroa, Michael Henry, Kevin Hand, Maya Tolstoy, Loretta Hidalgo, Kelly Snook, Megan McArthur, Tori Hoehler, Charles Pellegrino, Michael Atkins, Christina Reed, David L. Dubois, Ricardo Santos, James Cameron
Studio Walt Disney Pictures
MPAA rating G (General Audience)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

There was more discussion of life elsewhere in the Solar System.
J. Greenhouse
Overall, Aliens Of The Deep did not feature as many deep sea creatures as I would have liked.
Pet Nemo
Before I even get to the film, I have to say I have a problem with the title.
Daniel Jolley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
"Aliens of the Deep" is the first commercial film to document the mysterious creatures that live at the bottom of Earth's oceans, where no sunlight ever reaches. It was filmed in 2003, as 4 manned deep submersibles made 40 dives in 10 sites in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to get a firsthand look at these sun-less ecosystems thousands of meters below the oceans' surface. "Aliens of the Deep" was released theatrically in 3-D IMAX, which was probably more impressive than the smallish 2-D picture on a DVD. Director James Cameron, exploration enthusiast and a great student of deep sea life, was on one of the submersibles and does some narration, but most of the narration is by other members of the team: astrobiologists, marine biologists, and a marine seismologist. Both the 47-minute theatrical version and an extended 95-minute version of the film are included on the DVD.

The pictures of the ocean floor are great. There are plants, fish, microbes, giant squid, giant tubeworms, and a lot of unidentifiable stuff down there. I was pleased to see the tubeworms, as I have always had trouble envisioning them from descriptions. An entire sun-less ecosystem powered by superheated, toxic fluid emitted from hydrothermal vents is intriguing stuff. But the narration is bad. The enthusiasm of the explorers comes across, but very little else does. They're excited. Very excited. They proclaim everything to be "incredible" with no explanation of why. But they aren't informative. The narrators are scientists of various descriptions, but not experienced deep sea explorers. They seem to just be along for the ride. They're not authorities on the subject by any means. So their narration is ebullient but superficial.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Eric Tilenius on January 31, 2005
Format: Theatrical Release
Veteran film director Jim Cameron (Titanic, Terminator) turns his talents to filming the amazing ecosystem of the deep sea hydrothermal vents. The IMAX footage is unlike any glipse of this amazing universe ever seen! Cameron shares the spotlight with many up-and-coming scientists and explorers, which is great.

My only wish was that there were more details provided about the fantastic (real!) creatures in this film... it's a pure visual treat, and a fantastic glimpse at an amazing world, but perhaps a little shorter on substance that I would have wished. However, there's a companion book I just ordered that I think will help answer questions where this movie leaves off.

All in all, a MUST SEE, especially while it's still on the big IMAX screen!
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 3, 2006
Format: DVD
This documentary is not nearly as good as it should have been. Before I even get to the film, I have to say I have a problem with the title. Yes, I understand that the creatures at the bottom of the ocean (few of which we actually get to see here, incidentally) are so different that they appear "alien," but the denizens of the ocean's depths are about the last creatures on planet Earth I would refer to as alien. I think the title is actually a tip-off to what this documentary really is at its heart: James Cameron's pitch to be the first explorer of the oceans possibly existing on truly alien worlds. This whole thing (and I should note that I'm talking about the 95-minute version) is more about speculations concerning alien worlds than it is about our own ocean's depths. In a sense, the methods and means of studying life miles below the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is akin to the exploration of alien oceans, but Cameron and his gang really stretch the point here. I'm sorry, but a month aboard an ocean vessel is not quite the same as a trip to Mars or the moons of Jupiter, no matter what one young scientist says. Every time we actually get to go back beneath our oceans, the documentary is soon hijacked by hypothetical comparisons to the exploration of alien worlds. By the end, some of that speculation really sounds scripted. I for one hope that bona fide scientists, rather than a rich and daring enthusiast like Cameron and a stable of giggling grad students, oversee those alien missions if and when they take place.

This film simply forgets what it is supposed to be about on several occasions.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Martin A Hogan HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on November 17, 2005
Format: DVD
Director James Cameron originally made this film for 3D theaters and a lot is lost in the translation to television. "Ghosts Of The Abyss" served well in a smaller format, but "Aliens Of The Deep" just sinks and sinks. There is more emphasis on special effects and hypothesis of life on other planets than seeing the real "Aliens". Sure, thousands of shrimp piled around a volcanic vent is kind of cool, and that fish with two feet-like appendages is unusual, but other than a large translucent jellyfish, there's not much here. All the younger scientists look and talk like actors and the technology of going deep in clear bubble-like compartments is amazing, but it all seems too staged. The extras are interesting only in that they go into more depth about the crew and the machinery. I would recommend this perhaps, on a large 3D screen, but don't bother for the home theater.
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