All Cry Chaos (Henri Poincare) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.00
  • Save: $7.17 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 21? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by gehlbh
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Very nice condition, Clean. Ex library book. May include library pocket, stickers, stamps or evidence that these have been removed. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

All Cry Chaos (Henri Poincare) Hardcover


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$21.83
$16.35 $0.01 $29.95

Frequently Bought Together

All Cry Chaos (Henri Poincare) + The Tenth Witness (Henri Poincare Mystery) + Sycamore Row (Jake Brigance)
Price for all three: $57.53

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 70%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Series: Henri Poincare
  • Hardcover: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Permanent Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1579622224
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579622220
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (120 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,116 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Math wizards will delight in trying to unlock the intricacies of Fenster s findings, but even math phobes who equate high school geometry with stomach spasms will enjoy this first-time novelist s richly descriptive thriller. Here s hoping Poincare dodges retirement and adds more adventures to his caseload. -The Washington Post

Weaving fractals and chaos theory into an international mystery that also confronts great moral and theological questions, Rosen crafts a literate, complex tale in this first of a series; a prequel will be next. Highly recommended - Library Journal

...readers, especially the mathematically inclined, will relish this intellectually provocative whodunit. --Publishers Weekly

Although it feels like a late entry in an established series, All Cry Chaos is in fact Rosen s first novel... Add in Rosen's sharp, lucid prose, and his way of rendering complex mathematical and scientific concepts like fractals sexy and engaging, and you get an involving, high-concept, but eminently readable thriller, easily one of the best first novels of the past couple of years. --Mystery Scene Magazine

Calling all fans of fractals, international-criminal conspiracies and the End of Days: Your ship has come in. - Kirkus

Rosen has a fine detective in Poincare, whose supple mind can wrap itself around the more abstract implications of Fenster s theories, including the notion that proof of a grand architectural design underneath all the world s chaos might argue for the existence of a grand architect. --The New York Times Book Review

Tragic, resolute, refusing to yield under threat, or after disaster, Poincare follows the trail to its conclusion while all he's loved seems to fail. A beautifully detailed novel, with satisfying breadth and depth, intricately woven patterns, and well-chosen illustrations from a range of books and journals, All Cry Chaos is mathematically, artistically, and even historically satisfying; a truly enjoyable first in what promises to be a fine series. --Cafe Libri

All Cry Chaos is a challenging work. The subject matter may be unusual but the theme is not: Chaos, as the book puts it, is the way of this world: We love, if we can, and lose what we love. But the world goes on. - Joan Baum, NPR

The plot, drawing on math and religion, should attract fans of such cerebral thrillers as Arturo Sangalli s Pythagoras Revenge (2009) and Michael Gregorio s Critique of Criminal Reason (2006). --Booklist

Beautifully well-written, with interesting and fully-developed characters, high-octane tension, elegant mathematical constructs, and human hearts that are both noble and black as the night, "All Cry Chaos" is one of the best thrillers I have ever read. --Utah Daily Herald

About the Author

Leonard Rosen is a best-selling and widely respected non-fiction author among educational publishers (including Pearson, Allyn & Bacon, Little Brown, and Nelson Doubleday). He has written Radio Essays broadcast by NPR's Morning Edition, Only A Game, and All Things Considered, as well as op-eds published by the Boston Globe. He has taught writing at Bentley University and Harvard University. He lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

More About the Author

Translated into ten languages, Leonard Rosen's All Cry Chaos (Permanent Press, 2011) won the Macavity Award from Mystery Readers International for the best debut; was selected ForeWord Magazine's best work of fiction by an independent American press, earned an Edgar nomination for best debut, and earned finalist recognition for the Chautauqua Literary Prize and the Anthony Award. Len has contributed radio commentaries to Boston's NPR station, written best-selling textbooks on writing, and taught writing at Harvard University. The prequel to All Cry Chaos, The Tenth Witness, will be published in September 2013. To contact Len and for links to interviews and reviews, see www.lenrosenonline.com

Customer Reviews

Very very sorry to see the book end.
Robert Pater
The author develops this character and the other characters in this amazingly complex story.
IDIrishbiker
There are some interesting twists and turns that will keep your attention.
horace blankenship

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

181 of 183 people found the following review helpful By B. Smith on January 15, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Look, I'm 87 years old and my kids worry. They're the caring kind and keep checking me out, looking for signs that I'm "losing it." So when they asked me if I'd like to try reading a mystery, I accepted the challenge, even though I prefer the good old easy reading pros like John McPhee, AJ Leibling, E B White. They gave me "All Cry Chaos" and I started it off one evening. Sleep got to me at midnight. Next day I started early and finished it off. It's a brainy read and I had trouble with some of the technical stuff, like the fractals. But the writing is so good, the plot so ingenious, I had to race to the finish. If I hit 88 and Rosen writes another, I'll buy it.
11 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Let's Book on August 20, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I loved this book, plain and simple. Reasons that I loved it: the plot catches your attention and drags you in, right off the bat. No waiting until 50 pages in to see what's going on. The detective is one of the most sympathetic and riveting characters I've encountered in a long while. He is completely believable, and when his heart broke, mine did too. The author weaves math, specifically fractals, into the mystery in a way that is both integral (no pun intended) and educational--but without making the reader actually DO any math. The supporting characters are all well-drawn as well; there are several of them that I would be happy to see featured in their own books. The ultimate solution to the mystery is both believable and surprising. Finally, the author uses the mystery to open up a discussion of questions of import: why are we here? Can good triumph? Can we make a difference?

This book made my life happier for the days that I was reading it. I will for sure look for more books in the series, and I'll give All Cry Chaos a 5/5*.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By S. Deeth TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 23, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Born in 1852, Jules Henri Poincaré was a French mathematician and physicist, considered to be one of the founders of modern topology, and a significant contributor to Einstein's theory of relativity. More importantly for this novel, Poincaré worked on chaos theory and fractals, developing a deep understanding of how the whole can so precisely mirror the part.

The protagonist of Leonard Rosen's taut thriller, All Cry Chaos, is another Henri Poincaré, but this man, now nearing retirement, has devoted his life to criminal investigation rather than math. As Interpol's Poincaré studies the murder of a famous mathematician, he's frequently greeted with "Are you related...," and has to say yes, a simple relationship reflected in the parallels of mysterious photographs and exploded images, fractured families and ruined lives.

Tested like Job in Biblical pre-history, threatened with the end of his world and Revelation's rapture, Poincaré travels from Europe to America and back, finding in each tiny clue a reflection of greater truth. Nobody's quite who they seem; singularities pose choices, and choices determine futures yet unseen; and the branching veins of a broken hand still look like a mountain range viewed from above.

Tragic, resolute, refusing to yield under threat, or after disaster, Poincaré follows the trail to its conclusion while all he's loved seems to fail. A beautifully detailed novel, with satisfying breadth and depth, intricately woven patterns, and well-chosen illustrations from a range of books and journals, All Cry Chaos is mathematically, artistically, and even historically satisfying; a truly enjoyable first in what promises to be a fine series.

Disclosure: I was given an advanced reading copy of this book by the publisher, the Permanent Press, in exchange for an honest review.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Laurie Fletcher VINE VOICE on October 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Sunlight bursting through clouds over that section of the Herengracht gave the famously flat city a towering, vertical dimension."

There is something about this book that defies description. It is a masterpiece of time, place, and character but it also manages to make comprehensible the mathematical geometry of fractals by demonstrating their existence in nearly everything we see around us. Maybe even to the point of their application to models of human behavior?

In this book, which could have been unbearably arcane, mathematics forms the subtle background in a beautifully crafted mystery. And what a delightful conceit to make our veteran Interpol agent, Henri Poincaré, the great-grandson of one of the greatest mathematicians of the 19th Century. Also named Henri Poincaré, this polymath of epic reputation introduced the modern principle of relativity upon which Einstein based his later work.

The book opens with Poincaré visiting Stipo Banovic, a war criminal from the former Yugoslavia who is accused of vast atrocities that included the murder of Muslim men and boys. Poincaré was instrumental in apprehending Banovic and has now come to see him one last time before moving on to other duties. The dynamic between these two men feeds one of the main story lines in "All Cry Chaos" and it is a painful, horrible journey.

The other main story line involves the murder in Amsterdam of James Fenster, a young Harvard mathematician whose work on fractals surfaces again and again to form the weave for the story. He was in Amsterdam to deliver a paper to the World Trade Organization when his room was surgically removed from the Ambassade Hotel by a bomb.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0x9d5042f4)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?