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All Delighted People EP

All Delighted People EP

August 23, 2010

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Product Details

  • Label: Asthmatic Kitty
  • Copyright: Copyright 2010 Asthmatic Kitty
  • Total Length: 59:29
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00406525S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #57,721 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 24 customer reviews
A must have for all Sufjan Stevens fans.
Evan
While it steps back from the edgy, purely instrumental offering of The B.Q.E., it is easy to see the musical ancestry from that recording to this.
Steven Elliott
This album proves it...he is a truly beautiful spiritually touched man.
Jessica Van Doren

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Ken Meyer on May 25, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Why is this classified as an EP, I ask you? It is more full of ideas, beauty, pathos, experimentation, and yes, length, than many releases nowadays. I have loved all of Sufjan Steven's work ever since picking up Seven Swans years ago (though Sun and Rabbit are not quite as quality filled, in my opinion), but even I did not expect the effect this cd would have on me. Being an older music fan, longer songs have always appealed to me (yeah, my prog love is showing), and this cd is stuffed with them. But, they never wear on me, I never grow bored...I just want to put on the headphones and tune the world out. I have listened to his cd so many times since buying it, I cannot even begin to count...sometimes several times in a row.

An added bonus is having my 10 year old daughter, after overhearing it in my studio, becoming just as attached to the cd as I am (and even branching out into Simon and Garfunkel because of the repeated homage in one of the songs). After exposing her to more Stevens, she is probably the only 10 year old repeatedly listening to a beautiful song about a serial killer (John Wayne Gacey, from the Illinois album). Is that a good thing? I think it is.

This is the music I want to soothe me on my deathbed.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Evan Staley on August 24, 2010
Format: MP3 Music
I like Sufjan a lot. His lyrics have such a wonderful way of drawing me into intimate stories before yanking me back out to take a look at my own life, America, God, and much more. His music, as he describes it, is often the perfect combination of high art and low art, merging the warmth of folk music with the grandiose of a symphony orchestra. When these elements are at full effect as they are throughout much of Illinois, Michigan, and Seven Swans, he hits me like few others can.

Then there are moments where his ambitions seem to run off and leave me in the cold emotionally. Long, flute-heavy instrumentals, while still technically impressive, never connect for me the same way he does in simpler moments like his astounding Casimir Pulaski Day.

As you might expect, this EP (which only maybe qualifies as such based on its hour-long run time) leans a little more toward the latter style. The title tracks are a suitably epic ode to the apocalypse, which I can't claim to have fully absorbed yet. The Owl and the Tanager is a gorgeous piano-driven song, and the closing track a 17 minute guitar song for single mothers. The point is, this is some eccentric and wildly creative stuff. Fortunately for fans, it's also really really good once you take the time to get into it.

I'd also highly recommend streaming it off his site at [...] before buying it. Enjoy!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By T. Cook on May 29, 2011
Format: Audio CD
i know. who cares about my personal listening history with sufjan stevens...? somehow, it seems relevant to me. i bought "seven swans" upon its release all those years ago. i played it; i liked it. i liked some of it a lot. i was not driven to purchase his other releases. what did i care about michigan and illinois(e)? then i saw that some magazine had rated "the age of adz" as the album of the year. i was curious. i bought it. i thought, "this guy is either a genius or the biggest show-off of all time." after a few more listens, i was flabbergasted and was forcing people to listen. i had to know if others heard what i heard....if they would be as overwhelmed as i was... needless to say, it didn't take me long to go out and get "illinoise", "michigan", "enjoy your rabbit", "the avalanche", "a sun came", and, finally, "all delighted people." (i have the christmas set on order.) (the "bqe" will be next. somehow i know it.)
i see the number of reviews some of sufjan stevens' albums have received, and i was shocked to see how few reviews have been written about "all delighted people."
i know i've played it fifty times in the past few weeks. i wonder if people are avoiding it because of it being labelled an ep. it's over an hour of incredible, intense, beautiful, heart-crushing, unbelievable music. i think, with this one, i've answered my own question. he may be a show-off....he MAY be, but, without a doubt, something is going on here. this man is shocking in his ambition...and he pulls it all off. i am astonished; i find myself listening in disbelief.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 15, 2010
Format: MP3 Music
Sufjan Stevens is one of those few artists who can truly stun you with just how passionate and talented he is. Need an example? Take the shimmering, enchantingly lovely "All Delighted People EP," which is actually longer than many full-length albums -- colorful folk pop, warbly vocals, and a strong religious slant.

"Tomorrow you'll see it through/The clouded out disguises put you in the room," Stevens sings mournfully in "All Delighted People (original)," which drifts between soft, bittersweet folk-rock and an epic song of soaring angelic choirs and sweeping strings.

As if the music wasn't good enough, Stevens sings of overcoming inner fear, doubt and hypocrisy ("I tried my best I tried in vain/Oh! But the world is a mess! Oh! But the world is a mess!"). There's also a brass-soaked "classic-rock" version of the title track, which sounds far more cheerful despite having the same lyrics.

I think my brain would explode if the entire album was like that, so fortunately the next songs are less intense. Instead, Stevens relies on soft piano-led melodies, earthy guitar folk, twinkly soaring little ballads (from the POV of God?), and murky experimental ballads. And it ends with "Djohariah," a seventeen-minute rock epic of squiggling synth, trumpets and melancholy guitar.

"All Delighted People" is an almost perfect example of what Sufjan Stevens can do. Without losing sight of his classic sound (the classic rock "All Delighted People" made me flash back to his first album), Stevens manages to expand his sound to include some new, spellbinding musical journeys. The first song is a trip all on its own!

In fact, there's only one song that didn't blow me away: "The Owl and the Tanager," which isn't bad so much as kind of... musically slow.
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