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We All Fall Down Mass Market Paperback – August 1, 1993


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 870L (What's this?)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Laurel-Leaf Books; English Language edition (August 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440215560
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440215561
  • Product Dimensions: 4.8 x 0.6 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #990,153 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In an unapologetically severe story about four boys who victimize Karen Jerome and her family, Cormier once again explores the potential for malice in all of us. The teenagers leave the Jeromes' home in ruin; Karen is assaulted and subsequently hospitalized in a coma. Not for the squeamish, Cormier's novel doesn't mince words: "The vandals shit on the floors and pissed on the walls and trashed their way through the seven-room Cape Cod cottage." Like Robert Westall ( The Machine Gunners ; Blitzcat ), Cormier surpasses most other writers by the sheer force of his words. Much more than a pulp thriller, this compelling, richly textured novel is told from several points of view, including that of the vandals themselves. Cormier illuminates even the darkest characters with humanity, so that in the end, readers see the complicated fabric of life itself. Motives, thoughts and feelings are set forth--not without hope, but irrevocably tragic as well. Ages 13-up.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 8 Up-- After the benignities of his last novel, Other Bells for Us To Ring (Delacorte, 1990), Cormier returns to the gritty form that made him famous. His new novel is sure, accordingly, to inflame the same parental passions and excite the same critical controversies that visited the publication of The Chocolate War (1974) and After the First Death (1979, both Pantheon). It is also sure--like those books--to find a devoted following among the kids themselves, who will recognize and embrace the authenticity of the achingly awful adolescent world that Cormier has created. It is a world in which emotions are raw, evil exists, and violence--both studied and offhand--is an everyday occurrence. The book begins, in fact, with overt violence--the trashing of a suburban house by a group of teenage boys--and ends with a more subtle kind of violence--the trashing of love and the destruction of hope. If this looks like familiar territory, look again. Cormier is gingerly exploring some new terrain here, both literally (by moving his setting from the familiar confines of Monument to the neighboring community of Burnside) and figuratively (by counterbalancing the emotional aridity of evil with a genuinely moving and nurturing love story). More familiar territory is a suspenseful subplot involving a character called "The Avenger," whose goal is to exact revenge for the trashing. Although it certainly will keep readers turning the pages, this may be the weaker part of the novel, particularly its resolution, which seems somewhat glib. Other considerations, however, of character, setting, and the complexity of family interrelationships are richly realized. And the overriding thematic treatment of the dialectics between good and evil and free will vs. predestination is sure to stimulate discussion and vigorous dialectic of its own. --Michael Cart, Beverly Hills Public Library
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

I suggest that everyone pick this book up and read it.
Miracle1711
Also, the reader feels more connected to the conflicts in the novel because he/she experiences the conflicts from several characters' points of view.
Fosters Students at RHS
Another good thing in the book is that while you are reading it, the whole time you are trying to figure out whom the "Avenger" is.
KARO MARTIROSYAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Lauren Houghton on November 20, 2001
Format: School & Library Binding
I really enjoyed this book by Robert Cormier. The characters and the plot display the evil in our everyday life. However, I thought that some of the events seemed rather unrealistic. Cormier took many different plots and brought them together in unexpected and surprising ways. The book teaches lessons about regret, love, and loyalty. I think this is a book for mature readers. It taught one major lesson: every action recieves a consequence. This message was bold and understandable for all readers. In conclusion, I really enjoyed this book by Robert Cormier because it contained all the elements of a good, suspenseful, yet tragic novel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Usman on April 17, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One would expect many problems to arise in one's life during adolescence, but never anything as twisted as the situations illustrated in this book. In this book, Robert Cormier uses a very disturbing yet absorbing plot of complicated relationships, and manages to create a story that will bother the reader's mind for weeks after reading the book. Through the use of very complex and sometimes unstable characters, Cormier shows that deception comes in many forms. One of the factors that adds to the suspense of the story and keeps the reader's attention throughout is what I call Cormier's 'split plot POV' writing style. Just as is seen in other works by this author, such as I Am the Cheese and After the First Death, he tells the fictional story through the eyes of more than one character, thus using different points of view and making it all the more interesting to read. The fast-moving chain of events also adds to the dramatic effect upon the reader. From what I've read of Cormier's works, he has a habit of unhappy, but nonetheless effective endings that leave the reader either wanting more, or wishing that they hadn't picked up the book. In my case, every time I finish one of his novels, I feel a little more sane and more human; We All Fall Down was no exception. In relating to the characters, no matter how twisted they may be, the story becomes more real to me, and the life lesson to be learned from it gains a deeper meaning. This is definitely the kind of book that encourages reading -- even in the twisted and hectic lives of adolescents.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Much like the Chocolate War, We All Fall Down deals with everyday problems teens' face in school, home, and in their personal lives. I loved how Cormier made this book accessible to teens but to adults as well. Abuse of alcohol, lies, the thought of death, and the deconstructing of family are issues that this book deals with. Cormier lets the reader see how Jane and other characters deal with these issues by writing from more than one point of view. For example, the reader can see how Jane copes with the fact her sister Karen is in a coma and might not wake up. Not only does this allow teenagers to relate to these feelings and emotions; it also connects to adults as well. They were once teenagers and have gone through the same situations as Jane, Karen, and Buddy. By reading this, adults can get a sense of what life is like for teens today and understand the reasons why teens do the things they do. It is the issues the book discusses and how the characters cope with their problems that makes this book so important to society today.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Scherpenisse, P. on April 30, 2002
Format: School & Library Binding
It is hard to imagine how you will feel when you are confronted with people who violate your house and your family. Robert Cormier has the imagination to show us exactly what a young adolescent will feel when something terrible happens to her. It also tells you how to get over the trashing and how to get on with your life. Oh yes, and there is also 'the Avenger'.
This book is a must read for young adolescents. It will give them an idea of what happens to other people if they commit these crimes and it could prevent them from doing these terrible things.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 8, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is one of those books whose words echo in your head for the rest of your life. You may forget the characters names, you may even forget the characters, but the essence of the book seeps into your fingers and colors your judgement. It is a subject that plagues the real world and cuts like a knife. It chills you to the bone like all of Mr Cormiers stories, and like all of them it fills you with appreciation for what you have
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on September 10, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is one of the most emotional and real book I have ever read. It explains why we have to be careful and extremely catiuous at times. I love this author and the books he writes. I have already read I Am The Cheese, and liked the storyline. I hope other kids get to experience it also because it's magical in it's own way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 5, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Cormier's intense, suspenseful, and ironic plot makes this novel a great page-turner. The different characters and different point's of view make the book more exciting. How at the end all of the characters come together for a very strange ironic ending of the book. This is a great book but I would not recommend it for anyone under 14. This book was disturbing and included a lot of mature context.

There are 3 different sides to this story one from Jane Jerome a teenage girl whose house gets trashed and everything was ruined. Her sister Karen was admitted into the hospital and was in a Coma. Jane Jerome was never realized how much she loved her sister and her regular life routine. Now Jane struggles to live a normal life and forget about the past. Jane Jerome later falls deeply in love with a boy named Buddy Walker and she has never felt so much love in her life. She starts to feel like everything is going to be okay because now she has Buddy by her side.

The second main character in the book is Buddy Walker. Buddy Walker and his friends decide to trash a house for "Funtime". Later Buddy found out that the house he trashed was Jane Jermoe's. Buddy soon feel in love with Jane, and Buddy never admitting the truth to Jane and what he had done to her house.

The third main character in the book was the "Avenger". The Avenger is an eleven year old boy who seeks revenge from "Bad people". The Avenger was an extreme character in this novel and carried out many disturbing and engrossing acts through out the book. The Avenger is tied into the story at the end and his true identity was revealed at the end for a surprising twist.
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