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All My Friends Are Going to Be Strangers : A Novel Paperback – October 2, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (October 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684853825
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684853826
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #275,763 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Time Brilliant...funny and dangerously tender.

Boston Herald Larry McMurtry is one of American literature's native treasures.

Southwestern American Literature Richly suggestive. All My Friends Are Going to Be Strangers is a document for our times.

The New York Times Book Review Mr. McMurtry's characters are real, believable, and touching...and he is a very funny writer.

From the Publisher

7 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

More About the Author

Larry McMurtry is the author of twenty-nine novels, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Lonesome Dove. His other works include two collections of essays, three memoirs, and more than thirty screenplays, including the coauthorship of Brokeback Mountain, for which he received an Academy Award. His most recent novel, When the Light Goes, is available from Simon & Schuster. He lives in Archer City, Texas.

Customer Reviews

This is one of McMurty's best.
C. Carpenter
Every young man looking for a direction in life should read about Danny Deck.
Christopher
McMurtry has written much, much better.
kcgermer@aol.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 62 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 19, 1997
Format: Audio Cassette
This novel, McMurtry's fourth, is his most tender and charming. Danny Deck is a young, perpetually perplexed writer to whom things seem to inexplicably happen, yet Danny, who narrates the novel, never presents himself as a victim, and McMurtry successfully keeps the novel from becoming sentimental. McMurtry's finest achievement in this novel, however, is his evocation of a Texas no one else has ever written about--the young, academic, urban, sixties generation of Texans. If you didn't believe such a thing existed, this novel will convince you otherwise. That world gives this novel a funky charm (its frank sexual content was somewhat controversial in some circles when it was published.) Look for the usual McMurtry themes and characteristics, including well-drawn women characters and a perverse spin on the "old cattleman" in the character of mean-as-hell, 92 year old Uncle Laredo, who "was obsessed with last things." Chapter Thirteen, which concerns Danny's visit to Uncle Laredo out in Van Horn on his way back from San Francisco, is one of the funniest pieces of writing I've ever read, one of the very few times I've actually laughed out loud reading a book. The book is the first of a trilogy (which years later became a tetralogy, then a quinology, etc.) written in the late sixties and early seventies along with "Moving On" and "Terms of Endearment." It's my favorite of all of McMurtry's novels
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
One of the best books ever written. This is McMurtry at his finest. I have missed Danny Deck (main character) since I read the last line of this novel. This is the first McMurtry book I ever read. I later read every fictional book he wrote just to hear his "voice" again. This says volumes seeing that I normally have no interest in western genre; but I'll read the western ones because I grow to care for his characters as they dance off of the pages. After reading this book you should also read Terms of Endearment, Evening Star and Moving On for some of the same characters. This book really should become a film. Thank you Mr. McMurtry!!!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By robert.miller@gsa.gov on November 18, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Danny Deck is symbolic of the confusion that living life brings to us. I think everybody has wanted to run away at times and Danny does. Danny let's us run away and enjoy the craziness of life and the twists and turns it brings us. You'll feel for Danny and won't want the end to come. My favorite McMurtry read, barely beating out Lonesome Dove.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. Carpenter on March 1, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I adored this book. The characters, especially Danny, are extremely believable and intriguing. This is one of McMurty's best. This book introduces wonderful characters like Danny and Jill, but it also brings us back with Danny's friends, Emma and Flap Horton. I strongly recommend this nostalgic piece of fiction.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By jlebas@usa.net on June 14, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Danny is an amiable, aimless young writer looking for a life. Superb dialogue. Lots of zaniness, sort of like Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Lot of road trips to somewheres. A thread of vague sadness runs through it though.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Christopher on October 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I read this book when I was 23 and found it profounding, educational & entertaining. It made a huge impact on my life at the time. Every young man looking for a direction in life should read about Danny Deck. A great read and the best book I ever read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 29, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Funny and sad, from start to finish. Who wouldn't love Danny Deck, reluctant writer, adrift in the real world, trying to make a go of it as an artist??? Early McMurtry, worth a very serious look, surely this gives some insight into the author's own conflicted beginnings as a writer. LOVED EVERY WORD!!! And the sequel was pretty darn good, too....
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Tucker VINE VOICE on March 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
This fine book, written in first person, chronicles a few months in the life of a young writer, including his joys, success, and ultimately his decline. The main character is at first a charming individual, with an innocence and confusion often found in intelligent free thinkers, and eager to make a difference in the world through his writing and his friends. Yet as the book progress, we find his innocence eroding as his confusion deepens. Unable to handle the success of his career coupled with the lack of success in his personal life, Danny Deck goes on a journey, searching for meaning through his former friends. In the end, he recognizes that he cannot return to his former life and finds himself in a psychological vacuum with no answer other than to blame his own success for his problems.

Amidst the process and the search, we find many funny characters such as Uncle Laredo known as Uncle L, his wife Martha, a cantankerous lady who loves goats, and old man Lorenzo. Danny takes all these people in stride without much emotional response and continues his journey which ultimately is his own mental and social decline. While the book has an eerie sadness that seems to accompany each page, we still find ourselves rooting for Danny to get himself together and write another book.

McMurtry's style of using events and characters to define the essence of the story and outline its purpose makes for a smooth and powerful approach to writing. In this case, the sorrow of Danny's life blends with poor judgment to create a memorable character with no future. A rather depressing book, with few redeeming human qualities demonstrated, All My Friends reminds us of the bleak emotions that often bubble beneath the surface of our human facade.
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