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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 13, 2012
For those who wqondered what really happened in the 90's in Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and even Cambodia,this book is a wonderful introduction. It a historical account of the legal attempts to bring those responsible to Justice, a formidable task in a complicated world. The author is to be congratulated for his persistence despite tremendous resistance here and abroad. One would hope 'NEVER AGAIN', was clear enough. However---
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 6, 2012
David Scheffer proves that it is indeed possible for a book concerning atrocities to be overly maudlin. It is disappointingly poor writing from one of the architects of modern international justice, even one who is as angry and resentful, as the editorial reviews label him. For want of a well-turned phrase, Scheffer is happy to string together several sloppy ones. The polemic is far more forgivable for its tone and vitriol than it is for its unrelenting inelegance. There was a truly good book to be written here, and Scheffer has failed far worse in that project than ever he did in the events that it attempts to frame.
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on May 2, 2013
One aspect of justice for atrocity crimes that Scheffer discusses in All the Missing Souls is the issue of preventing genocide in the future, although he never comes up with a concrete solution. Scheffer seems to hold so tenaciously to the idea that the International Criminal Court serves a deterring function for all future crimes against humanity, but so far there is no empirical proof so far that it does. New media play a significant role in the way ideas gain traction in society, while also significantly shaping public opinion. The technology of today's media environment allows anyone to publish themselves easily, which can work as both an advantage and a disadvantage for defenders of human rights. As stated on the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website: "Holocaust denial on the Internet is especially a problem because of the ease and speed with which such misinformation can be disseminated. In the United States, where the First Amendment to the Constitution ensures freedom of speech, it is not against the law to deny the Holocaust or to propagate Nazi and anti-Semitic hate speech." The article goes on to elucidate that: "The Internet is now the chief source of Holocaust denial and the chief means of recruiting for Holocaust denial organizations." The Internet was founded on the concepts of openness and customability. It would not be such a useful resource today if it had not been, as society's contributions as a whole have made it into the fast paced wealth of knowledge that it is today. However, these same concepts allow anyone to post false or manipulated information. The decentralizing movement of news sources from their traditional unbiased structure and the fact selecting their own news are issues that raise the question `Where can the truth be found if there is no longer one reliable source?'
Looking forward, a primary objective those actively affronting ongoing issues of human rights violations, in large part by engaging the surrounding community in the effort. To do this it is paramount to understand how individuals feel a sense of obligation to one another. This link between the individual and a larger group must be formed by the media. The ways in which the new media environment creates communities influence the sense of obligation individuals feel to one another, especially since the original function of news was to link people together with common information. The function of the new media is that it can provide pathways to action, especially through social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter. Since, those being persecuted (Rwanda, Darfur, etc.) had or have limited access to their own media outlets, it is essential to learn to use media to over the Bystander Effect and foster a sense of community that will help humanity for posterity.
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on February 18, 2015
Fantastic book. I love the political aspects brought to life. It brings a wonderful introduction to the need for international justice.
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