All You Need to Be Impossibly French and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $4.06 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 21? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: good condition, normal shelf wear
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

All You Need to Be Impossibly French: A Witty Investigation into the Lives, Lusts, and Little Secrets of French Women Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.94
$6.50 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

All You Need to Be Impossibly French: A Witty Investigation into the Lives, Lusts, and Little Secrets of French Women + Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl + Lessons from Madame Chic: 20 Stylish Secrets I Learned While Living in Paris
Price for all three: $35.09

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (November 28, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452287782
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452287785
  • Product Dimensions: 2 x 3.1 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #69,529 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A fascinating—and illuminating—read. -- Daily Mail

British expatriate Powell, a regular contributor to the Sunday Times and other newspapers, explores the allure of French women, including their sense of style and their feelings about relationships, diet, exercise, work, and family. In witty prose, she interviews politicians, former models, beauty pageant queens, and others to get the scoop on how French women stay thin, attractive, sexy, and chic no matter their age. Shopping is a form of exercise, but going to a gym is unheard of, just as wearing tennis shoes or exercise clothes when not exercising is unthinkable. This book is similar to Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl by American writer Debra Ollivier, except the comparisons are between British and French women. At the conclusion of the work, one is left wondering whether any woman would want to emulate the style of Frenchwomen, as sensible as many of their ideas are, because they come off like chain-smoking perfectionists who obsess over themselves to the detriment of having close female friendships. Recommended for large public libraries. -- Christine Holmes, Library Journal

Witty, and very elegantly written... verbal Viagra. -- Sunday Times

About the Author

HELENA FRITH POWELL is a regular contributor to the Sunday Times—where she writes the "French Mistress" column—as well as the Daily and Sunday Telegraph, Tatler, Harpers & Queen, and the Independent on Sunday.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

The little secrets from french women makes you want To be more girlie!
Reroll
I have been married for over 20 years, and I love my husband so much I cannot think of life without him.
Tod McKinney
I really liked the book, I found it to be an easy read, funny, informative and quite inspirational.
E. Malkin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

97 of 101 people found the following review helpful By C. Farley VINE VOICE on December 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
perspective. Of course there is the typical and expected good advice to maintain daily good grooming habits, that daily attention is MUCH better than a major overhaul as well as incorporating movement into daily life rather than scheduling "exercise" as a separate part of life. What was most interesting was the tremendous social/cultural differences highlighted between British/American and French women. Rather than endless praise for their enviable chic, the author notes it comes at a high price of constant competiveness with all other women over every tiny part of life, never trusting in the faithfulness of a partner and never really relaxing and enjoying the company of a female friend. Also the quotes that start each chapter are perfect little "bon bons" or "bon mots". An excellent read to learn more about modern European life-- to keep you intellectually fascinating as well as making yourself more

visually stunning.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
157 of 170 people found the following review helpful By Tod McKinney on October 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
I am French. Moved in the US 4 years ago.
I do wear sneakers, practically live in them.
Healthy eating in France?? I am just roaring with laughter at that one. It usually takes me 2 weeks to recover from all the heavy eating when I come back from visiting my family.
And last but not least, your husbands are perfectly safe with me. I have been married for over 20 years, and I love my husband so much I cannot think of life without him.
So, please drop the stereotype! French women are not a different species. They come in all size and shapes, some are nice, some not so nice.
As for this book, it is just meant to be entertaining, not an actual anthropopology study.
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
198 of 218 people found the following review helpful By Theresa Reed on December 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a fan of the language, I like to read anything about 'la vie française' that I can get my hands on. Especially about the women. I have always heard about how chic, well groomed, witty and incredibly slim they are. In "All You Need To Be Impossibly French", Helena Frith Powell gives insight into the "lives, lusts and little secrets" of french women. As an ex-pat from England, Frith Powell approaches the subject from an outsider's perspective, which I enjoyed. She spills the beans in a delightful way on everything to fashion (french women are never seen in sneakers), to diet (eat less but good quality) to exercise (they don't - they may do yoga or walk but that is about it). It all sounds charming for the most part - but Frith Powell also sheds light on the nastier side of french women - according to her, most french women are "out to sleep with your husband/boyfriend", they are extremely competitive with other women, do not enjoy close female friendships nor do they like to work. I am not sure if I can totally believe this blanket statement, but my sister, who has been living in Montreal for over a decade (I know it is not France, but it is very 'french') claims that Frith Powell is correct in her assessment. So, although I love the whole concept of the chic life of french women, if what the author purports to be true is an actuality, then I would rather have my trustworthy girlfriends, my faithful husband, my work and my extra 10 pounds. That being said, this was a great book and a quick read. I got through it in one day flat.
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
82 of 92 people found the following review helpful By MS on June 12, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This reads like a typical article in Cosmo (the Doxy's Digest) puffed up into book length. Frith Powell is witty, and occasionally sharp-eyed. She doesn't mince words about the Frenchwoman's self-absorption, competitiveness, and lack of interest in female friendships; these qualities come across as quite cold. But Frith Powell also blathers on obsessively about the Frenchwoman's thinness, disciplined cultivation of her appearance, "waxed legs," perfect haircuts, and all the other surface adornments whose fault is just that: they're surface. Frith Powell adds that Frenchwomen regard their intellects as further tools of seduction. Frith Powell's own intellect seems all over the place, as she adds a number of dubious (or sometimes just plain false)historical details about long-dead Frenchwomen to prove her theories. The writer Colette, for example, did not "dance drunk on tables" in her sixties. By that time she had severe arthritis and would have had quite a problem clambering up there. Nor did Colette "marry her son-in-law." She had an affair with her stepson, which is bad enough, but not quite the same. Frith Powell makes a number of other careless mistakes. If she was going to bring up these examples, she should have bothered to get them right.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Diana F. Von Behren TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 17, 2007
Format: Paperback
In the wake of the very popular and successful "French Women" books by Mireille Guiliano, author Helena Frith-Powell rides the wave, researching her French counterparts as only a Brit can. Her goal? To discover what constitutes that je-ne-sais-quoi quality that French women possess that allow them to not only tie a great scarf and wear a pencil skirt with aplomb but make them so appealing on such a universal level that women around the world wish to emulate them.

While Guiliano, in her French Women series depicts les francaises (with herself as the quintessential representative) as naturally chic, De Beauvoir philosophical and assuredly commonsensical regarding diet, apparel and romance, Frith-Powell analyzes them from an-across-the-Channel vantage point that sparkles with a playful wit that is part Anglo-Saxon criticism and part out and out green monster envy.

Interestingly enough, I find Frith-Powell's observations about French women indicative of women in any microcosm no matter what their nationality or culture. Sadly, as Frith-Powell comments, the good old boy network that men seem to ease into naturally simply does not exist for women. A control issue of sorts comes into play where the subject woman views herself as the overseer of her domain. Any challenges to her supremacy are looked upon with great suspicion hence the necessity for the superlative attributes Frith-Powell eyeballs with such amusing thoroughness.

A good male friend of mine commented to me recently that as the weaker sex from a biological standpoint, women's sole motivation in life seems to him to be the acquisition of a comfortable nesting place.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa4ea8978)