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All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life Paperback – October 15, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0896085992 ISBN-10: 0896085996 Edition: 1ST

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 243 pages
  • Publisher: South End Press; 1ST edition (October 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896085996
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896085992
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #285,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A brilliant, gripping narrative of the corporate state's brutality to the land of its First Natives and the valiant ones who are resisting and rebuilding their culture and identity." -- Ralph Nader, consumer advocate

"This is the book I would have used had it existed 35 years ago. Eight portraits of Native-American peoples refusing to make distinctions among spirit, politics, land, and all life. A sense of faith and deep continuity on Turtle Island, our continent ravaged by invasion and time.... No ragtag remnants of lost cultures here. Strong voices of old, old cultures bravely trying to make sense of an Earth in chaos." -- Whole Earth, Winter 1999

About the Author

Winona LaDuke lives on the White Earth reservation in Minnesota and is an enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is the Project Director of the Honor the Earth Fund and Campaign Director for the White Earth Land Recovery Project. In 1994, LaDuke was named by Time as one of America's 50 most promising leaders under 40 years of age. In the 1996 presidential campaign, she served as Ralph Nader's running mate in the Green Party. In 1997, with the Indigo Girls, she was named a Ms. Woman of the Year. LaDuke received the Reebok Human Rights Award in 1998.

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Customer Reviews

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Please, please, please read this book.
Cathleen M. Walker
Informative, powerful, and transformative, LaDuke here provides an antidote for our increasing alienation from the land and biota that sustain us.
J.W.K
All Our Relations, Winona LaDukes book about native struggles for land and life, is very informative.
"tianh"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J.W.K on September 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
Spoon-fed news by large media corps, few were aware that Winona LaDuke ran for the vice presidency under Ralph Nader in the 2000 elections. Even fewer know that she is also a Native American eco-philosopher with a critical perspective on the health and future prosperity of America. All Our Relations is particularly instructive, in that LaDuke surveys the entire American landscape (and by landscape, I am not merely referring to the political landscape), showing the deep connections that exist between local cultures, their environments, and the corporate-governmental giants that often compromise their health. Although LaDuke has specifically focused on Native American communities, the stories are engaging and instructive for Americans in general. Informative, powerful, and transformative, LaDuke here provides an antidote for our increasing alienation from the land and biota that sustain us. A must read for any conscious American.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
LaDuke quickly, compassionately, and thoroughly takes us by the hand and introduces us to a good number of various Native American landscapes, into many clever, tough portals of indigenous survival ingenuity...and clearly illustrates what is good for 'them' is good for anyone living currently on planet earth. Our common domicile's fragility is met with good, strong protectiveness and tenacious, wise intent from the active folks LaDuke interviews. It is especially humbling and informing - her style of writing reaches in and takes you calmly down a harrowing road from which you cannot forget the lessons you learned: quite a feat. Definitely a keeper for your bookshelf, and a good one to recommend and give to graduating kin, enviro-friends, and the unsuspecting uninitiated. Wow. Informative, insightful, just plain brilliant.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tim Hundsdorfer on December 7, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think in light of other reviews it makes some sense to underscore that this book is not about environmentalism in the traditional sense, but about the connection between the environment and people. LaDuke's great contribution to the environmental debate is her all-too-rare understanding that there is a connection between the earth and the people that live on it. Not in some hocus-pocus new age way, but a real, scientific connection between people (particulary Native people, because of their lifestyle) and polution. My lone criticism is the charicaturization of corporations in this book. GM does pollute, but consumers are also to blame. Nevertheless, LaDuke is undoubtedly correct in connecting the dots between industrialization, militarism and environmental pollution and she does so in a way that few authors have ever done. A fantastic book that stands in stark contrast to Earth in the Balance as a real manifesto for true environmentalists.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By ucity@hotmail.com on March 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
La Duke, the 1996 (and hopefully 2000)US Green Party nominee for the Vice-Presidency, has written one of the most enlightening and compleiing accounts of the consequences of environmental injustice in the United States. Combining historical context with descriptions of the landscape of contemporary struggles, La Duke shows how First Peoples in North America have been not only forcably evicted from their land, but how their current homes are serving as the dumping ground for the detritus of White Consumerism.
Each chapter tells the stories of various tribes who have been burdened by nuclear waste, poor agricultural lands, and polluted water. In each case native peoples have developed strong organizations to fight for social justice. The insightful analysis presented here makes one excited by the prospect of a LaDuke Vice-presidency. She is much more aware of the importance of community action and limiting corporate power to protect the environment than the current US Vice President whose administration abandoned any pretext of environmentalism during the course of misguied policies that know-towed to the wishes of corporate polluters.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Cathleen M. Walker VINE VOICE on January 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
To think this woman could be our Vice President today. Most people don't even know that Winona LaDuke ran for Vice President on Ralph Nader's ticket. An articulate and passionate writer, LaDuke presents an awareness of the plight of America unsurpassed by any other. She knows what's wrong. She knows what needs to be done. She knows who is doing the work, how and why. She presents her advocacy as human, heartfelt and real. I learned things about what is happening to this country that I would never have known otherwise. You certainly don't see it in the news, and you don't learn about it in school. We're in trouble, folks, and it's not too late to do something about it. With more power she could have made such a difference! But she continues to work on the issues, and it is so important that more people are aware of her work. Please, please, please read this book. It is the most important book you will read all year.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Saleem Ali on April 1, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
La Duke is an inspiration to young environmentalists all over the world irrespective of their lineage. This book clearly resonates her strong beliefs and convictions about environmental issues through numerous case examples. However, I was hoping that there would be more in terms of research inquiry about the causes of environmental injsutice. Why is it that tribal leadership, and often a large constituency within a tribe, often repudiate much of the environmental ethic which is presented here? It is easy to dismiss this question by saying that the government or corporations are to blame, but I personally think that there is more at play than just external manipulation. I would urge La Duke to respond to some of her critics within the Native American establishment in her next work -- which I am sure will be just as compelling and positively provocative. Also it may be useful to have a chapter responding to environmental historians such as Calvin Luther Martin. I think a good work responding to these revisionists is needed from a seasoned and erudite Native voice such as La Duke.
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