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All the President's Men (Bloomsbury Film Classics) Paperback – October 8, 1998


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Product Details

  • Series: Bloomsbury Film Classics
  • Paperback: 382 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (October 8, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747540896
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747540892
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (159 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,025,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The New Republic Much more than a "hot book." It is splendid reading...of enormous value....A very human story. -- Review

The New York TimesA fast-moving mystery, a whodunit written with ease....A remarkable book.

Dan RatherAn authentic thriller.

Publishers WeeklyExhilarating and candid...trip-hammer reportage.

The Denver PostFascinating, stimulating....One of the greatest detective stories ever told.

The New RepublicMuch more than a 'hot book.' It is splendid reading...of enormous value....A very human story. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward are coauthors of The Final Days (Touchstone/Simon & Schuster), the behind-the-scenes account of Richard Nixon's last days in the White House. Carl Bernstein is the author of Loyalties: A Son's Memoir. Bob Woodward is the author of The Commanders, Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA 1981-87, Wired: The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi, and coauthor (with Scott Armstrong) of The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Good job Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.
Jan McAdams
I would recommend this book to anyone in high school or older.
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The book lags only in its convoluted `plot'.
Kendal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Robert W. Kellemen on June 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
With the recent revelation that second-in-command FBI agent Mark Felt was indeed, as often conjectured, "Deep Throat," Woodward and Bernstein's "All the President's Men" is sure to experience a revival of interest. And why not? It is riveting writing with the cloak-and-danger stuff that would make Ian Fleming jealous.

The opening words of the opening chapter lure in readers. "June 17, 1972. Nine o'clock Saturday morning. Early for the telephone. Woodward fumbled for the receiver and snapped awake. The city editor of the Washington Post was on the line. Five men had been arrested earlier that morning in a burglary at Democratic headquarters, carrying photographic equipment and electronic gear. Could he come in?"

The break-neck pace never stops. Page after page-turning-page, Woodward and Bernstein offer the political detective story of the century with their Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation that smashed the Watergate scandal wide open. In the process, they expose the inner workings of the Washington power elite and the inner workings of a paranoid President who approves a bungling burglary to seal an election that was never in doubt in the first place.

Buy it today. Or, dust off your old copy. This is water-cooler talk and you don't want to be left out.

Reviewer: Bob Kellemen, Ph.D., is the author of "Martin Luther: Pastoral Care in Historical Perspective," "Soul Physicians," "Spiritual Friends," and the forthcoming "Sacred Companions: A History of Soul Care and Spiritual Direction."
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Hilde Bygdevoll on July 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
I am not an American, and I often find that I come short when discussing political history with my American friends. Therefore, I am always looking for books that can fill gaps in my knowledge. "All the President's men" is such a book.
The beginning of this book contains a "Cast of Characters", a detailed description of persons and their involvement in the case. If you are a like me, you make sure to dog-ear this page for your reference, as you work your way through the flurry of different names and places. Fear not, the struggle of keeping track of everyone involved is worth it!
This book provides us with two distinct "different" story-lines. First, a fascinating description of investigative journalism. We learn how newspapers work, the fights over cover-page stories, the importance of getting your name under the story line, and arguments and discussions in the editor's office. I particularly came to admire the owner of the Washington Post, Cathrine Graham, for her tremendous courage during this period. The newspaper received threats, directed to specific people, as well as with regards to possible lawsuits. The case could have brought the paper down and destroyed it completely. Second, the very detailed and interesting guide to the collapse of Richard Nixon, the 37th President of the United States.
The Watergate Scandal started innocently enough, with a simple break-in in the Democratic headquarters in the Watergate Hotel. The "Washington Post" had Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward covering the case. The two inexperienced reporters would soon see that the more they kept digging, the more obscure and unbelievable the story got. In the end, they had a list of people involved including the top level of government, the US intelligence community and ultimately, the White House itself.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Rubendall HALL OF FAME on August 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
What is largely forgotten is that in the summer of 1972, Bob Woodward and Carl Berstein were two young but complete nobody reporters assigned not to political reporting but the Washington Post's Metro section. When they were assigned to cover a "fourth rate burglary" at the Watergate Hotel, it changed the course of their careers and of American History. It is no exaggeration that had more conventional Washington political reporters been assigned to the Watergate story, it might never have been exposed in enough detail to bring down Richard Nixon. This book is an American classic. Though it lacks historical perspective on the Watergate affair, it is vital to anyone who wants to understand the greatest American political crisis of the Post World War Two era.
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Jason A. Miller VINE VOICE on July 14, 2002
Format: Paperback
Time has not dulled the impact of "All the President's Men". It's been thirty years, now, since the thwarted break-in at the Watergate. Most of the higher-ups in President Nixon's administration have passed away, and subsequent generations reared on Iran-Contra and Whitewater may not even remember what the fuss was about. But from the very first page of this book, history becomes life and events rush forward to the inevitable conclusion that still seems impossible today.
Woodward and Bernstein's reporting is the major thrust of the first half of "President's". We watch both reporters work late into the night, interviewing reluctant and/or anonymous witnesses in an attempt to find out just why the Watergate burglars had connections with the White House, and how far up the political chain of command those men were connected. Along the way, mistakes are made and a reputations are wrongfully derailed. But the story -- the crimes and the subsequent cover-ups may have indeed been directed by the President of the United States himself! -- takes on a life of its own, and Woodward and Bernstein become witness to the defining story of an era.
Much of "All the President's Men" has passed into legend, especially the unrevealed identity of Woodward's executive branch contact known only as "Deep Throat". The Watergate players to this day still debate just who Deep Throat was -- John Dean seems to publish a book on the subject every five years. Time has proven most of the accusations correct -- for an interesting exercise, try comparing Woodward's and Bernstein's discoveries with the corresponding daily entries in "The Haldeman Diaries").
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