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All the Rage: A Riotous Romp Through Rock & Roll History Paperback – May 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Billboard Books (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823078426
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823078424
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,275,073 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The Faces were vital contributors to rock in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and McLagan, the Face's keyboardist, tells their story and his own convivially. Before admitting Rod Stewart and guitarist Ron Wood and willy-nilly becoming the singer's backup band, the Faces had recorded, as the Small Faces, the protopsychedelic hit "Itchycoo Park," with Steve Marriott out front. McLagan's early proximity to the stars makes him a crucial source of inside dope on them. And McLagan not only collaborated with Marriott, Stewart, and future Rolling Stone Wood. He hooked up with Who drummer Keith Moon's ex-wife and experienced sadly characteristic harassment from Moon the Loon. Doin' toot with Ike Turner, trying to get Stewart to record the occasional Faces song in the midst of his burgeoning megastardom, having Pete Townshend intervene when Moon hired goons to get him--McLagan tells all and then some. A fine addition to our knowledge of the relationships within '60s rock and their incidental but vital salacious aspects and a must-read for aging rockers. Mike Tribby
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

About the Author

A transplanted Englishman, Ian "Mac" McLagan is now a resident of Austin, Texas. Dave Marsh, author of many books about popular music, is one of America's most respected rock critics. He lives in Norwalk, Connecticut.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Jim Hannaford on July 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
I really hated for this one to end, but I raced through it anyway. In most of the photos Mac is smiling or laughing. That's exactly the tone of his writing, too. You'll laugh and smile too as he takes you along on a fast-paced tour through British rock history. Thanks for writing this, Mac, and Best of British (and American) to you!
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Frank G on March 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
All The Rage was GREAT FUN!!! A story of one the ORIGINAL MODS! A member of the seminal Mod band The Small Faces ( as well as The Faces: the band's sound ripped off by the Black Crowes) "Mac " McLagan is a funny and poignant writer. Why read All The Rage? What relevance and interest does this autobiography hold? Well, MOD is the ONLY authentic, non "corporate", GRASS roots YOUTH culture dynamic going today. The book chronicles the life of one of its EARLIEST participants and shows how Mod , with its roots heavily rooted in US Blues and Soul morphed into Heavy Rock ( such as Led Zeppelin, Humble Pie and McLagan's Faces) while other elements branched into Disco /funk of Rod Stewarts ( Do You Think I'm Sexy? era) and the murky combo of BOTH genres in the "Some Girls" heyday of The Rolling Stones. "Mac " was there for ALL of it and shares the details of what went on BEHIND the SCENES. Any student of youth culture and pop music will find the book invaluable as well as a LOT OF FUN!The stories of musical triumphs and debacles are sad, poignant and most of all well written.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Hammonddave on June 29, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is one of the greatest biographys of the rock era. Ian tell his story of how real people survive in this crazy time of sex, drugs, and R&R! Fans of the time, along with Hammond and other keyboard players, will love this book!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By El Teye on September 25, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Have to admit: I've been a fan of Mac's work ever since the Small Faces released Shalalalalee. Nevertheless, fan of the music does not imply fan of his writing. So I started the book with caution, like I start every 'music' book: is it a brilliant trip that whisks me away on the journey, or is it a cheap ripoff of the fans who cannot stay away?

Rest assured: this book is a) very well written, very entertaining, very funny, and b) never spirals down (like so many other similar works) into Oh they did this to me, I never got recognized for that, etc.

Anyone who knows Mac will confirm: reading this book is like listening to the man talk: one anecdote pours into the other during a very human and often hilarious conversation, always delivered with that unmistakenly British great sense of humor.

Cheers Mac, you've given me many hours of reading pleasure, on top of what I already owe you for playing on much of the soundtrack of my life.

Especially recommended for fellow musicians!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark Kelly on September 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Someone wrote: ALL THE RAGE is little more than a litany of boozy gigs, plane trips, dull hangovers, and bad business deals.

Duh! A true book about the rock life! And a cautionary tale, too, for any musician. Great job, Mac!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By greenpete on January 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
If you're interested in this book you probably already know Ian McLagan's background, but here's a brief refresher: McLagan was one-fourth of the band Small Faces. Shamefully underrated, they created a treasure trove of semi-psychedelic singles in England in the late '60s, only one of which crossed the Atlantic: the incomparable "Itchycoo Park." They had a prolific and talented songwriting partnership in Steve Marriott-Ronnie Lane and a powerful drummer in Kenny Jones. Along with Steve Winwood and Joe Cocker, Marriott had one of the most soulful voices to ever emerge from a Caucasian larynx. The band also created an album masterpiece, "Ogden's Nut Gone Flake."

McLagan played organ for the Small Faces. He wasn't a virtuoso, but for the short, catchy tunes that the band penned, he didn't need to be. His Hammond playing effectively compensated for Marriott's limited guitar skills, and he had a playful psychedelic sound all his own. When Marriott quit the band to form Humble Pie, McLagan, Lane, and Jones recruited Rod Stewart and Ron Wood and morphed into the less-exciting party band, Faces. When the Faces broke up in the mid-70s, McLagan provided session and touring support for some of the top rockers in the business, including Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, Bonnie Raitt, and others. He's currently living in Austin, Texas and has a regular club gig with his Bump Band.

"All the Rage" is exactly what it's billed as: a "riotous romp" through rock history. It's unique for rock bios in that it was not ghostwritten. McLagen wrote his biography from memory, on planes, buses, and in hotel rooms.
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