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All the Rules Have Changed: More Cartoons by Ted Rall Paperback – September, 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0896201194 ISBN-10: 0896201198

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Rip Off Pr (September 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896201198
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896201194
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 8.8 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,597,065 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Ted Rall is a post-punk editorial cartoonist who "exposes the hypocrisy and absurdity of our current social and political state." He has said that editorial cartoons "are an opportunity to basically kick ass, destroy politicians, change the way people think, and just devastate the system from the editorial page." His collection All the Rules Have Changed is filled with dead-on humor, such as his advice to kids in the strip "Kid's Talk": "Even if you make it to adulthood without getting aborted, dumpstered, neglected, molested or murdered, your parents will eventually force you to subsidize their retirement while you struggle to get by ... [so] kill your parents before they kill you." No wonder he was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer in 1996.

More About the Author

Ted Rall is a nationally syndicated political cartoonist, columnist, graphic novelist, editor, author and occasional war correspondent.

Twice the winner of the RFK Journalism Award and a Pulitzer Prize finalist, Rall's important books include "Revenge of the Latchkey Kids," about the travails of Generation X, and "Silk Road to Ruin," a survey of ex-Soviet Central Asia. He traveled to Afghanistan during the fall 2001 U.S. invasion, where he drew and wrote "To Afghanistan and Back," the first book of any kind about the war. He was also one of the first journalists to declare the war effort doomed, writing in The Village Voice in December 2001 that the occupation had already been lost.

Rall's latest book is "The Book of Obama: How We Went From Hope and Change to the Age of Revolt." His next book, "After We Kill You, We Will Welcome You Back As Honored Guests: Unembedded in Afghanistan," comes out in November 2013.

Inspired after meeting pop artist Keith Haring in a Manhattan subway station in 1986, Rall began posting his cartoons on New York City streets. He eventually picked up 12 small clients, including NY Weekly and a poetry review in Halifax, Nova Scotia, through self-syndication. In 1990, he returned to Columbia University to resume his studies, from which he graduated with a bachelor of arts with honors in history in 1991. (His honors thesis was about American plans to occupy France as an enemy power at the end of World War II.) Later that year, Rall's cartoons were signed for national syndication by San Francisco Chronicle Features, which is no longer in business. He moved to Universal Press Syndicate in 1996.

His cartoons now appear in more than 100 publications around the United States, including the Los Angeles Times, Tucson Weekly, the Harrisburg Patriot-News, Pasadena Weekly and MAD Magazine.

Rall considers himself a neo-traditionalist who uses a unique drawing style to revive the aggressive approach of Thomas Nast, who viewed editorial cartoons as a vehicle for change. His focus is on issues important to ordinary working people--he keeps a sign asking "What do actual people care about?" above his drafting table--such as un- and underemployment, the environment and popular culture, but also comments on political and social trends.

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