All Things at Once and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$3.68
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $21.27 (85%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

All Things at Once Hardcover – January 5, 2010


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.68
$0.01 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

All Things at Once + Knowing Your Value: Women, Money and Getting What You're Worth + Obsessed: America's Food Addiction--and My Own
Price for all three: $15.97

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Weinstein Books; First Edition edition (January 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1602861110
  • ISBN-13: 978-1602861114
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #834,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In her second year as cohost of MSNBC's Morning Joe, TV news veteran Brzezinski is on fire, after enduring her share of professional setbacks and personal hardships. In this straightforward, frank account of her career trajectory, Brzezinski, the daughter of President Carter's national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski, does not bother to disguise her hard-fought ambition to secure a top news anchor position or hide the fact that she is not satisfied (nor very good at) being a stay-at-home mom of two daughters. From the beginning of her TV career, working her way up at local affiliates in Hartford, to her big break, getting hired in 1997 for an overnight CBS network anchor program in New York, Up to the Minute, the author resolved to make the frantic pace work, despite the increasing toll the late hours and absences from her family were taking. Distracted, pressured to return too early to work after the birth of her second child and exhausted, she took a bad fall down the stairs of her Yonkers home while holding her infant. The trauma scared her into slowing down, but not for long. Opportunity has seasoned Brzezinski but not hardened her, and having found her venue and voice with Morning Joe, she shares a refreshingly pragmatic approach for the professional woman: don't wait to have children and don't let your job treat you like a bad boyfriend. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

“Having It All,” the title of the modern Superwoman’s to-do list, implies a sequential mastery of the tasks at hand. Career? Check. Husband? Check. Kids? Check. Yet instead of accomplishing her life’s goals one at a time, Brzezinski managed to juggle them more or less simultaneously. Occasionally, however, something came crashing down, and it was one such literal fall—down a flight of stairs with her four-month-old daughter in her arms—that caused the bright young star of broadcast journalism to rethink her priorities. From her days as a cub reporter in a small New England TV station to high-profile anchor responsibilities with CBS and MSNBC, Brzezinski’s career frequently fell prey to network politics, causing her ability to simultaneously function as a committed wife and mother to suffer as a result. Filled with as much self-deprecating candor as self-congratulatory bromides, Brzezinski and coauthor Paisner nonetheless offer a realistically detailed portrait of the pitfalls to be avoided on one’s professional and personal paths to success. --Carol Haggas

More About the Author

Mika Brzezinski is the co-host of MSNBC's "Morning Joe," a show Time Magazine calls "revolutionary" and the New York Times ranked as the top news show of 2008. In January of 2009 Mika launched and became the Co-host of Citadel Media's syndicated radio show "The Joe Scarborough Show".

Prior to joining MSNBC in January 2007, Brzezinski was an anchor of the "CBS Evening News Weekend Edition" and a CBS News correspondent who frequently contributed to "CBS Sunday Morning" and "60 Minutes." Brzezinski joined CBS News in 1997 as the anchor of "CBS News Up To The Minute," but took a short hiatus in 2000 to co-host MSNBC's weekday afternoon program "Homepage." In September 2001, she returned to CBS to become their principal "Ground Zero" reporter for the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Brzezinski began her journalism career in 1991 in Hartford, Connecticut, as a general assignment reporter at WTIC. A year later she joined WFSB, also in Hartford, and quickly became the weekday morning anchor.

A native of New York City, Brzezinski is the daughter of Foreign Policy Expert and Former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski. She attended Williams College and received a degree in English. Brzezinski lives in Manhattan with her husband and two daughters.

Customer Reviews

I am a huge fan of Mika and was so excited to read her book.
Tasha Weiss
The truth is it simply isn't possible to do everything at once, and accepting that simple truth will help all of us find our success and happiness.
Lynette R. Fleming
Mika says she isn't cut out to be a full-time, stay-at-home mother, so I wonder why she wanted kids at all.
Leeanna Chetsko

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

135 of 179 people found the following review helpful By reader 2227 on January 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Mika Brzezinski has promoted this book, by saying that she has advice that she wants to give to young, professional women. One piece of advice, that Ms. Brzezinski likes to trumpet to younger women, is: "Don't forget to have children!"
Mika writes, on page 4, "One of the first things I talk about, when I speak with young women about jump-starting their career - even if they don't ask [is], 'Don't forget to have children...'"
Mika's publisher's blurb blares, "She shares a refreshingly pragmatic approach for the professional woman: don't wait to have children..."
However, when Ms. Brzezinski has her two children in her 20's, as Mika promotes and expounds in her book, Ms. Brzezinski is also, privileged enough, to be able to hire a slew of nannies and back-up. Mika speaks of a helpful husband, and she is able to have a staff of babysitters and housekeepers, but nonetheless, Mika can't seem to manage. Although, Mika employs a range of domestic help, Mika still bemoans continually, about how depleted and overburdened she is.
It turns out, that raising children, can be quite exhausting. Who knew that children had so many needs? Mika berates herself, for not having employed more caretakers sooner to watch her children, and doesn't want the reader to make the same mistake. Mika's message: Don't forget the fleet of hirelings and surrogates!
But, even with assistance and support, Mika distracted, falls down her stairs as she is holding her second daughter. While in the emergency room, there is the fear that the baby might be paralyzed in some way. Luckily, that was not the case, and the fracture to the little girl's femur bone is repaired. Mika and her husband then decide to hire even more household help, to "have the kids staffed" with no interruptions.
Read more ›
20 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Lisa on March 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I got this from the library and finished it in less than three hours. Wow. Driven by what seems to be an obsessive need to be in the spotlight, Brzezinski neglects her children for a life that keeps her--rather than them--the center of attention. She freely admits that she finds true parenting to be a chore and would much rather be a "fun" parent. Being a parent means accepting that some days are nothing but temper fits and tears, whilst others are hugs and fun, and most are in the middle, with a little of both to keep things interesting. Brzezinski believes the proper way to raise her children is to take out loans and foist her daughters upon nannies and sitters so she herself has as little interaction with them as possible. At first I found this incredible; however, by the end of the book, it became quite clear that those kids may well be better off with people who actually want to be around them. If her horrific recounting of what happened when she believed her daughter to be paralyzed couldn't make her see the forest for the trees, well, perhaps it's best she sticks to her book tours and morning show and leaves her children in much more capable hands.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
I read this book because I wanted to see what a co-anchor, on one of the three cable news stations had to say. The women and men who `host' these shows, funnel and filter the news for America, so their positions can have an undue influence on the American political pulse. It has always struck me as odd, that Mika can stridently and pompously, repeatedly descend on anyone who dares consume sugar. Yet, Ms. Brzezinski, can just as easily $hill for $tarbuck'$ $weetened drink$.

What advice could Ms. Brzezinski have, about "balancing career and parenting young children?" Mika, with frequent verve, repeatedly tells professional women, that they should have their children in their 20's, just as Mika did. On the other hand, Ms. Brzezinski employs an armada of nannies and babysitters, to outsource the care of her children, which she glosses over. What Mika is trying to package as parental advice, seems empty when she admits how little she sees her own children. This often makes Mika appear clueless, in a Marie-Antoinette sort of way. One is left baffled, from what Mika espouses, and then how she leads her own life.

In Mika's own words: "It meant we'd need virtually full-time babysitting help." (p 79) "I could have used much more help, but we could barely afford just the one sitter." (p 96) "He [her husband] took out loans to hire another nanny so I could get the rest I needed, and all the support we needed around the house. We hired a night person and a day person." (p 112) "We set it up so the house could run efficiently in my absence - and even in my presence." (p 114) "She [Mika's daughter] was about nine, and she was making an appointment on her cell phone because she didn't want to wait for Mommy to get around to scheduling a cleaning.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
69 of 96 people found the following review helpful By Meijer Bjorn on January 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I enjoy reading about others lives, even when I know very little about them. That was the case when I decided to read Mika Brzezinski's, "All Things At Once." I became a little worried when the marketing of the book was focused on career women. I have the wrong plumbing and I am perfectly satisfied working with my wife in her in-home childcare business. With that said, I went into this book wanting to provide insight relevant to anyone interested in Mika's book.

"All Things at Once," by Mika Brzezinkski reads much like how she describes her career. It starts out with the intention of doing great things. The focus of the book is pretty rough with signs of promise. There are parts that are good and others that fall short. By the last third of the book, the memoir comes into its own. It pulled me in and began to tug on me in an emotional way.

The beginning of the book takes a glimpse at Mika's childhood. It is interspersed with mentions of her career. Mika's father was the national security adviser during the Carter administration. Her family in all aspects were country folk that enjoyed hunting and had a lifestyle far removed from the Washington socialite scene they had become apart of. The memoir glances over this information, which if given more detail would have been excellent reading.

Mika goes on to highlight the start of her career. She discusses her choices that created a hectic and stressful life. All this leads to an accident that made Mika take a closer look at her decisions. This becomes a vital turning point in her life. Mika's family dynamic is different from the typical two working parent household. The demands put on Mika and her husband, because of their careers, creates an environment that may shock some reading the book.
Read more ›
12 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?