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All Those Mornings...at the Post: The Twentieth Century in Sports from Famed Washington Post Columnist Hardcover – Bargain Price, April 26, 2005


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Hardcover, Bargain Price, April 26, 2005
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 404 pages
  • ISBN-10: 1586483153
  • ASIN: B000BOB338
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,714,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Povich, Washington Post sports columnist for 75 years (until his 1998 death) and Baseball Hall of Famer, had a reputation for fairness and honesty. This posthumously published work reflects his knowledge, loyalty, integrity and love of athletics through sample articles as well as tributes by such admirers as his son Maury, the talk show host, and Post columnists Michael Wilbon and Tony Kornheiser. Povich's columns and essays are divided into eight decades, from the 1920s through the '90s, and demonstrate Povich's evolution from excitable youth ("I could scarcely wait for the morning paper to see my name in print") to assured professional. Povich describes the "evil Olympics" of 1936, castigating Nazi prejudice but also condemning an American track coach for withholding participation by two Jewish athletes. Shoeless Joe Jackson receives sympathetic treatment, unlike George Preston Marshall, founder of the Washington Redskins, whom Povich criticizes for forcing injured athletes to stay in a train's no-frills coach and baggage section, rather than nicer Pullman cars. Povich brings alive the colorful personalities of golfers Ben Hogan and Sam Snead, heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis and tennis ace Bill Tilden. This enlightening work provides an indispensable overview of American sports in the 20th century. Photos. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School-For more than 75 years, Povich shared his love of sports with readers of the Washington Post. This volume commemorates the 100th anniversary of his birth and has some of his best and most-loved columns. Arranged by decade, they reflect the evolution of organized sports in the U.S. The elegance of Povich's writing never disappeared despite the topic. He did not shy away from the hard subjects, such as the murder of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics or racism in sports. His 13-part series on the integration of major league baseball won a prestigious National Headliners Award. He witnessed Lou Gehrig set his 2,130 consecutive game streak and Cal Ripkin break that same record. Included are tributes written by those who considered themselves fortunate to have known Povich, among them Tony Kornheiser and Michael Wilbon. This title will appeal to sports fans and the sports clueless alike, and to journalism students.-Peggy Bercher, Fairfax County Public Library, VA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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What's more, you get the story behind the story.
D. Sean Brickell
We've purchased two as gifts because it is interesting, well written and enjoyed by any sports fan who knows some sports history.
Carrie Mccall
I grew up in Washington reading Shirley Povich regularly.
George

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Matt Papuchis on April 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
An interesting conversation took place the other day. I mentioned to my grandfather, now in his early 80s, that I had just bought the new book entitled "All those Mornings...at the Post." And he responded with, "I grew up reading Shirley Povich."

My response: "So did I, and I am 25." And so did my father. That's the amazing thing about Povich - he linked generations. He wrote about stars from Walter Johnson to Michael Jordan and everyone in between.

As a freelance sports writer, and former sports editor of my college newspaper, the Towerlight in Towson, Md., Povich was my biggest inspiration growing up and I would be willing to bet that most other sportswriters or aspiring sportswriters feel the same way.

I tried to put in perspective to my wife how influential he was. I said he is the Humphrey Bogart of sports writing. He is the epitome of what newspapermen should be and he was just as good in 1994 as he was in 1924.

The amazing thing is he never retired and wrote his final column the day before he died in 1998. This book brings his most important columns to life and for people of my generation we get to live events such as the Senators' only World Series title in 1924 for the first time.

This book is a treasure and is highly recommended to anyone who has ever read a sports column. Chances are the person who wrote the column did so because Shirley L. Povich inspired him.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By D. Sean Brickell on May 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Rarely does a book take me very long to read, especially when its composed of a series of short pieces such as newspaper columns. Journalism isn't supposed to be literature, and sports writing particularly is mainly to give the doggone scores.

Then again, calling Mr. Povich a sportswriter is about as accurate as calling the Pope a good man.

Mr. Povich was the genuine soul of the almighty Washington Post, perhaps the most principled writer ever to grace the pages of any newspaper's sports section. He belongs in the very rare and esteemed company of great journalists such as Cronkite, Mencken, Twain and pehaps a few others.

Yeah, these pieces give you the story. What's more, you get the story behind the story. And it's done in language a 13-year-old can read and understand.

Knowing perfectly well how special this collection is, I read it as slowly as possible. Why rush a good thing? I'm sure Mr. Povich had to fight the daily deadline pressures to produce the work. The least we can do is savor his command of language and keen insight into human character.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John Matlock on May 12, 2005
Format: Hardcover
For almost 75 years Shirley Povich was a fixture on the sports desk of the Washington Post. He didn't exactly invent sports reporting, but he certainly help define it in a unique way. His style of reporting, his style of writing created a respect that went beyond sports. He used the sports world as a window on the broader world of America. Sports reflected the dramatic changes in American society over the course of the twentieth century from the depression, to war, to race, to everything else.

The problem with newspaper columns is that they get recycled with the rest of the paper. Only once in a while are a lifetime of columns lovingly collected by people who care (his children and a sports editor) and are published as a book.

If you are familar with the original columns, here is a visit with old friends. If you have not read the originals, here is the way that sports (and maybe everything else) should be reported.

This book is an absolute delight.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sports Man on April 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Long live the legacy of Shirley Povich. This book brings to the current generation the work of the best, Shorley Povich. It is mandatory reading for every sports fan!!!
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