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All Together Paperback – August 11, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 532 pages
  • Publisher: loveyoudivine Alterotica (August 11, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600546307
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600546303
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,227,007 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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My sex life would have been a hell of a lot better, though I would probably be dead by now.
Bartski
One of the things that's always depressed me about gay literature and movies from the 60s and 70s is that the characters are just so depressing.
D Lennon
The "All Trilogy" is divided as follows: Book One, "I Want It All;" Book Two, "All The Way," and Book Three, "All Is Well."
J. C. Thomas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D Lennon on September 6, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the things that's always depressed me about gay literature and movies from the 60s and 70s is that the characters are just so depressing. It seems that they're either bitter, cynical and nasty ("The Boys in the Band" 1970), or end up living tragic, lonely lives ("That Certain Summer" 1972). In 1969, Dirk Vanden had the audacity to imagine a world where gay men could actually be happy, where they could have friendships and relationships with other gay men, where they could accept themselves and one another. Yes, his characters go through emotional conflicts along the way, but they all end up in a better place. This was pretty revolutionary stuff.

Although the original publisher of the first two books in this series called them "fag hots," (basically masturbatory fantasies for gay men), all of these books are so much more than that. Yes, there are graphic sex scenes (and we're talking Falcon, not Bel Ami), but at their hearts these books are thoughtful, complex coming out stories. .

The crown jewel in the collection is ALL IS WELL, the story of a Mormon father dealing with his crumbling life and mental state as he moves towards accepting his repressed sexual urges. Part mystery, part study of the dynamics of a family, part portrait of a schizophrenic, and part treatise on the changing culture of the late-60s and early 70s, it's a tour de force. In particular, the exploration of the relationship between the father and his teenage son is insightful, sensitive, and quite beautiful.

These books are also interesting from a sociological standpoint, giving a glimpse at the burgeoning gay culture of late 60s Los Angeles and San Francisco and the ways that it cross-pollinated with the hippie counter-culture of the time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A.B. Gayle on August 19, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Kudos to loveyoudivine Alterotica for re-releasing Dirk Vanden's "All" trilogy: "I Want It All", "All The Way" and "All is Well". The three stories stand alone, each told from the first person viewpoint of a different character, however common characters and a couple of common events link them together.

The first book was originally released before the Stonewall Riots, and to quote Dirk: "My books weren't considered worthy of editing when they were first published.... We were lucky just to get the books published and to get a few bucks for an outright sale."

Drugs feature unapologetically strongly throughout. Both the upside - the euphoric feeling that you had all the answers, understood the essence of life and the universe and then the downside as reality stabbed euphoria in the back and painted black shadows around everything.

Apparently, one publisher wanted Dirk to "apologise" for all the drug use in his books, but as he explained it to me in an email: "We were illegal, immoral perverts in those days and anything we could do to our heads to keep from thinking how terrible we were just to have sex with each other and how even more terrible we were to write about it. As a result, I tried marijuana, mescaline and LSD and discovered that they "opened doors in my mind."" He assured me that: Drug use in Gay bars in the 60s and 70s was as common as beer and cigarettes, and, of course, like nicotine, and alcohol, the drugs were addictive."

The books are set solidly in the late sixties, early seventies, an era famous for its music, its hippies and its drug taking, but still a time when homosexuality was illegal in most States. The times they were a-changing though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sirius VINE VOICE on March 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have never heard of this trilogy before, but seeing that it was supposed to be a classic, I decided to give it a try and I am so happy that I did. There are so many things that should not have worked for me, but I thought that it was first and foremost joyful journey of self discovery and such a talented writer wrote it that I really loved it despite that I usually do not fell in love with the story with so many sex scenes in it. But I really loved the characters and I loved reading about the atmosphere of the 60s in the country which became my second home. The third book though shows off this writer's talent even more than the first two - it is a kind of suspenseful triller and it was done really really well.

And yes, all three stories have happy endings, was happy about that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Elisa on December 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Considering this book was first released in 1969, I was quite surprise to find a very good romance in the middle of a Gay Erotica novel (almost to the level of porn) in which there is rape (actually that is the very first scene, and it will be not the last), free use of drugs and extreme BDSM.

Warren is not an hero, but even for him it's no acceptable to torture a man for the only fault of being gay; so when he sees that his best friend Bill and another bunch of men are planning to castrate a man who dared to propose Bill in the backroom of the local bar, he intervenes proposing an "alternative" solution: to rape the man, all of them. Well, that is not exactly an heroic decision, but it's probably the only way to escape from that situation with both of them alive, if not in good condition. The man's name is Brad, and as soon as he cleans up a bit, Warren has the feeling to look into a mirror: Brad could be is lost twin, and I think there is a metaphor right here, Warren and Brad are the same man, only that Brad was brought up in liberal California, and he grew up accepting to be gay; Warren instead repressed it, and only the traumatic experience of seeing Brad, his imagine, being almost killed by the same men he called friends, brought it out.

The following scene, Warren and Brad in a motel trying to overcome the fear of what has just happened, is the most romantic and sweet scene of all the novel, and the reason why I considered this one to be a romance; Brad will leave Warren the morning after, but Warren is not ready to renounce to love and he will set in a quest to find the man again. He will end up in late '60 San Francisco, hustling and bustling to make the ends meet, and exploring the gay life, that life that Brad advised is not "gay" at all.
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