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All the Way Home Paperback – June, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Bethany House Publishers (June 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764226630
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764226632
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (130 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,867,914 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Readers who are jaded and skeptical about the quality of Christian novels will find Tatlock's fictional exploration of racial discrimination, hatred and the human heart a fine example of the progress being made in the category. It's a memoir-like tale of Augusta Augie Schuler Callahan, an eight-year-old German-Irish girl growing up in California who, as the youngest of six in an abusive and alcoholic family, informally adopts Sunny Yamagata and her Japanese-American family as her own in the late 1930s. War soon separates Augie from her beloved friends, who are deported to an American internment camp for Japanese-Americans. After losing touch for 23 years, they meet again in Mississippi in the racially torn 1960s, where Sunny is working to establish voting rights for blacks. Injustice is a funny thing... live long enough and you're going to get rained on, Sunny tells her friend, and as the story draws to a conclusion, they are challenged to make choices that reflect their own conflicts about race and forgiveness. Tatlock (A Room of My Own; A Place Called Morning) adeptly traces the girls' journey of faith with a light and sometimes humorous touch. She does an excellent job juxtaposing the horrors of Americans in Japanese hands and Japanese-Americans in the hands of their countrymen. Tatlock employs flashbacks efficiently, and her rich descriptions and characterizations are unusually fresh and inventive. Other Christian novelists would do well to emulate this quality contribution.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Against the turbulent backdrop of the Vietnam War, journalist Augie Schuler Callahan reflects on her girlhood in 1938 Los Angeles as she travels to a small Southern town to cover a story. She fondly recalls the Japanese American family who all but adopted her and her friendship with their daughter, Sunny, and agonizes over the end of their relationship when Sunny's family was sent to an internment camp after the attack on Pearl Harbor. When Augie arrives in Mississippi, she discovers that the woman who convinced her to come is Sunny, who is working to establish voting rights for blacks. As the two get reacquainted, they become involved in the conflict between the Ku Klux Klan and the local African American community. Tatlock (A Place Called Morning) writes well, but her emphasis on drawn-out scenes of injustice at the expense of the small, more human elements make her clever juxtaposition of the social issues-the civil rights struggle of the 1960s and the incarceration of Japanese Americans in the 1940s-less thought-provoking and fascinating than it could have been. (For example, while she goes into excessive detail depicting a sit-in on the lawn of a courthouse, Tatlock spends less time exploring Sunny's complicated decision to have plastic surgery to alter her Japanese appearance.) While there are more overt Christian elements than in her first novel, A Room of My Own, a brief, unflattering scene of a priest in a Catholic church may offend some. However, multicultural characters are still a novelty in Christian fiction, so this is recommended for most collections.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

I could hardly put this book down.
Jean Arnold
I'm now in love with Ann Tatlock, and thank her for a book that beautifully covers 2 eras of American history in a rich, deep, realistic and clear manner.
kn
What a wonderfully well written story.
A. M. Pawlik

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Sharon E. Hamilton on August 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
I picked this book up in my library and it is by far and away the best book I have read in a long, long time. I read a wide variety of fiction, legal thrillers, suspense, etc...This book blew me away. I could not put it down and cried my way thru it.
Even if you dont' think Christian fiction is your thing, I think that this wonderful book, told a story that was beautifully written, with a wonderful message, but without being "preachy" as some other Christian fiction has a tendency to be.
Don't read it because its a Christian novel, read it because its a wonderful story.
To
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A. M. Pawlik on June 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
What a wonderfully well written story. I have never read this author before and was pleasantly surprised. There were so many issues for discussion and so much history in the story that I am pushing for this to be on the required reading list at the high school where I work.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Tricia Goyer: Author, Speaker, Homeschooling Mom on May 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
I picked up this novel by Ann Tatlock after I saw that it won a Christy Award. Now I understand why. The writing was deep and thoughtful, the plot was extensive, following two young girls on a journey to overcome racism over a period of thirty years. If you like books that you can read slowly, pondering the vivid descriptions and feeling a part of the characters' lives, you'll enjoy this book.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ratmammy VINE VOICE on November 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
ALL THE WAY HOME by Ann Tatlock
November 15, 2007

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

I wanted to like this book a lot more. While I enjoyed the two subplots (that of the story of a Japanese American family living in Los Angeles before the start of W.W.II, and life for Black Americans in the Deep South during
The 1960's), I felt this book could have been better if either one or the other subplot had been eliminated. I understand that the author was trying to compare two terrible injustices played against two sets of minorities in America, but I think this could have been easily two separate books, or written differently (to be specific, shorter).

With that said, ALL THE WAY HOME starts off as the story of Augie Schuler, who in the 1960's is flying from California to the Deep South, to meet with a woman who wants to tell her story about her project helping Blacks to use their right to vote. On the plane, she meets a woman who is on her way back home to the South, and Augie flashes back to memories of another time, living with a Japanese American family who made her feel like she was one of them. Augie's home life was terrible, having lost her father early in life and now her mother was forced to move in with a brother, living in a crowded house with children from both families. Augie chose to spend most of her time away from home, and eventually came to live with the Yamagata's and became best friends with Sunny, who became more like a sister to Augie. The first half of the book details the friendship between the two girls, and the awful family situation that Augie had to endure at her uncle's home. But when W.W.II broke out, and with the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Augie lost her adopted family, who were sent to the camps.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sunshine on August 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is an incredible book with layer upon layer of story. It follows the life of Augusta Callahan, from her childhood experiences with her "adoptive" Japanese family to her involvement in civil rights in 1965 Mississippi. The injustice of the WWII Japanese internment camps is juxtaposed with the grievous treatement of African-Americans in the 1960's South. In the midst of this, we see how Augie's experiences and encounters are molding and shaping her. The quality of Ann Tatlock's writing is top-notch, creating a very readable and absorbing story--written so beautifully that the reader stops to savor the words and phrases themselves. Well worth the cost, you won't want to put this book down and you won't be able to get your mind off it weeks after you have read the end.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is the third Ann Tatlock novel I have read and I am telling everyone about it. Yes, this story deals with some huge issues, such as racial tensions, war, alcoholism and disfunctional families, but the wonderful part of this is that you are more caught up in the story than in the issues.
I was almost accidentally learning more than I ever knew about racism, etc. while being entirely captivated by the warm story line and it's diverse characters.
When I read an Ann Tatlock novel I am IN the story. It stays with me throughout the day and long after I've finished reading it. I recommend this book to anyone who wants quality, moral and entertaining reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Krysten on December 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book covers two different eras of racial discrimination. When we meet Augie, it's just prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Neglected at home, Augie is "adopted" by an American Japanese family. Life is wonderful -- until the Japanese are sent to the camps and Augie loses the family that truely cares about her.
Many years later, in the midst of racism against African Americans in the south, Augie and her Japanese "sister" meet once again and together fight against racism.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Thomson on June 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
All the Way Home is a touching story, teaching us how the world events of WWII and the Civil Rights Movement touched everyday lives. The author weaves the story with questions of faith--real ones that real people struggle with--without being preachy in the least.

I enjoyed the book so much that I read it very quickly, but it's also worthy of a longer more thoughtful reading. Quality writing from an award winning author. Highly recommended.
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More About the Author

I knew I wanted to be a writer from the time I tapped out my first stories on my grandfather's old manual typewriter in the summer of 1973. I studied English and theology in college and later went on to earn my master's degree in journalism from Wheaton College Graduate School. I worked as a writer and editor for Decision magazine from 1987-1992, when I left to pursue fiction writing fulltime. I find great satisfaction in my work, and I especially enjoy hearing from my readers. In addition to writing, I'm also the managing editor of Heritage Beacon, the historical fiction imprint of Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas.

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