Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $2.47 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Always the Bridesmaid has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Always the Bridesmaid Paperback – February 17, 2004


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.52
$0.50 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$1.00

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Rosie Effect
Bill Gates calls it "profound" -- check out Graeme Simsion's sequel to best seller "The Rosie Project," available now. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (February 17, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060571667
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060571665
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,254,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Perfect to take on holiday for those none-too-taxing days by the pool' Ireland on Sunday 'A real girlie page-turner that keeps you amused, entertained and guessing until the final page Belfast Telegraph 'A rollicking hilarious romance. Definitely one to carry on to the plane' RTE Guide --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Sarah Webb lives and works in Dalkey, Ireland. A children's bookseller for many years, she now writes books for children and adults, including the novel Three Times a Lady, which was a bestseller in Ireland and Great Britain. She currently works part-time as a marketing manager for children's books and appears regularly on Irish television.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I was a few pages into this book when it started to annoy me.
S. Fleming
Instead, I found the main character annoying, whiny and completely self-absorbed!
H.A.A.
For me, this made her a character I could relate to, not a character I hated.
Tracy Martin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
to like this book, I did! However, being a big fan of this genre, this book sounded cute and I was anxious to read it.......well, after about 50 pages I gave up. As the previous reviewer noted, the main charachter is so whiny and complaining and unlikeable, if she sighed or groaned or grumbled one more time I was going to puke! Seriously, she is like one of those friends who is always negative and gets you down and drains the life out of you - aghghggh! Stay away! I think this could have been an enjoyable book, but unfortunately, reading it felt more like a chore. I recommend Rachel's Holiday by Marian Keyes - wonderful book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on February 29, 2004
Format: Paperback
As she closes in on thirty, Amy O'Sullivan wonders how she failed at life. It is bad enough that she just broke up with her boyfriend who is sleeping with an ex friend of hers, but she now lives in her parents' home. Adding to her despondency is her younger sister Suzi has brought an Australian fiancé Matt Street to live with the O'Sullivans and Amy's best friend is engaged too. Perhaps her only satisfaction is her place of employment as the "Story Princess" telling tales to children, but depressingly to Amy none of her own.
Alcohol fails to take the edge off her jealousy that her sibling and buddy are both getting married while she will play second fiddle as a bridesmaid. Her dejection makes her miss a real opportunity with a hunk of a children's author who likes Amy even though she acts nasty towards him. Will she overcome her sad fog to see the light of love or will she remain a melancholy loser?
Sarah Webb enables the audience to see very deeply inside the soul of Amy, but that is a two-edged sword as the audience feels empathy towards her, but they will also dislike her destructive behavior especially how she treats the men in her relationships. Fans of a serious chick lit character study will enjoy this tale in spite of detesting Amy's behavior and hope she will find happiness.
Harriet Klausner
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Martin on March 10, 2005
Format: Paperback
I'm surprised by all the negative reviews that this book has recieved. I will admit that it's not the best book I've ever read, but it's not as horrible as some reviewers make it out to be.

The heroine is not the typical chick-lit heroine, which is probably the reason readers don't like the book. Soon after Amy discovers that her best friend Jodie is sleeping with her ex-fiance, her sister and her best friend announce that they're both getting married within the same week - and they both want Amy to be their bridesmaid. Amy reacts the way that many people would when confronted with such a situation - she refuses to speak to Jodie, goes on drunken binges, and does her best to exact revenge. While she's dealing with this, she also has to help her sister and her friend Beth with their wedding plans.

Amy is not the typical saccharinely sweet chick-lit heroine. Like most real women, she has a mean streak, and can sometimes react to things in ways that aren't neccesarily rational. For me, this made her a character I could relate to, not a character I hated. Amy is unhappy with her job, her personal life, and her situation in general, and the book resolves all the problems in a realistic way, instead of tying them up neatly and unrealistically the way most fairytale chick-lit does. If you're looking for a book that will encourage you to change the things you are unhappy with in your life, I would recommend "Always the Bridesmaid".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Fleming on March 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
I was a few pages into this book when it started to annoy me.
The clichéed language, and phrasing, the predictable plot, the things that just don't make sense (why does a university graduate end up in a dead-end job in a tiny bookshop?).
Some of the language just made me cringe, along with the inane descriptions, and 'filler' talk - a couple of classics:

"Beth spluttered her drink all down her top. Luckily it was black so the dark red wine didn't show."
"The Golf moved off smoothly, purring like a kitten. It was a joy to drive, responsive and nippy."

Some of the lines did actually made me cringe, and the 'modern' language and turn of phrase was just distasteful at times.

I think this was maybe an attempt at another Rachel's Holiday (Marian Keyes), except about depression. It falls short of that, as the inane chatter takes up the space that should be given over to describing feelings or actions typical of depressives. Once or twice I thought it would be developed in a more convincing way, but it never happened.

Webb must also be on a product placement retainer with every company in ireland, with all the brand names that she mentions. For me they only served to date the book back to the late 1990's/ early 2000's.

All in all, I hated this book, I only finished it because I'd started. I've also never written a review of a book, and went to the trouble of looking this up to see if I was the only one who disliked it so much.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
The Irish speak and write like poets, so this writer had to work pretty hard to write poorly, every page filled with old tired clichés and the words "kitten heel" "slagging" or "stupid."

The protagonist, Amy, is continuously moaning, groaning, or complaining. She is surrounded by caring people that dote on her, in spite of her constant rudeness to them. Every time she is sad, mad, or in any kind of bad mood, she takes it out on her caring friends, relatives, and boyfriends.

It just amazed me how these caring people kept coming back for more--with abounding patience. The most realist reaction I noticed was Tony, who lost his trust in her after seeing her use and drop Jed. Amy was very cold blooded to Jed, and she knew it. She felt a little embarrassed for herself over her treatment of Jed, but had no apologies for him--she couldn't be bothered by someone else's feelings.

Amy is always surprised whenever someone had a problem that had nothing to do with her. Oh, and the other person she liked--- (I don't want to give too much away here), I could not figure out why he liked her and kept coming back!

I always finish every book I start, that is just how I am, but this was one of the most difficult books to finish. If I had another book to read I would have switched and never finished it. If Amy was a friend I would have dropped her self-centered butt a long time ago, and if she was a relative she would hear from me once a year when I sent her a Christmas card.

Oh, and one reviewer said that this book explains how it feels to be depressed, and perhaps that might be true, but being depressed is no excuse for being rude to others.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews