Amarcord 1972 R

Amazon Instant Video

(100) IMDb 8/10
Available in HD

This carnivalesque portrait of provincial Italy during the fascist period, the most personal film from Federico Fellini, satirizes the director's youth and turns daily life into a circus of social rituals, adolescent desires, male fantasies, and political subterfuge, all set to Nina Rota's classic, nostalgia-tinged score.

Starring:
Pupella Maggio, Armando Brancia
Runtime:
2 hours 4 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Amarcord

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy
Director Federico Fellini
Starring Pupella Maggio, Armando Brancia
Supporting actors Magali Noël, Ciccio Ingrassia, Nando Orfei, Luigi Rossi, Bruno Zanin, Gianfilippo Carcano, Josiane Tanzilli, Maria Antonietta Beluzzi, Giuseppe Ianigro, Ferruccio Brembilla, Antonino Faŕ di Bruno, Mauro Misul, Ferdinando Villella, Antonio Spaccatini, Aristide Caporale, Gennaro Ombra, Domenico Pertica, Marcello Di Falco
Studio The Criterion Collection
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

"Amarcord" is one of my favorite films.
ECK
Through the interaction of these characters, Fellini allows his audiences to encounter a town, the families, a community, and the simple life that exists within it.
J. Brackett
At the same time, the film is much more than a mere visual presentation of Fellini's own nostalgia, for it also questions the true validity of one's own memories.
Daniel Garris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Miko on August 26, 2000
Format: DVD
Fellini's theme of coming of age memoir works as a beautiful nostalgic piece. The film resonates from an earlier film of his 8 1/2 showing the director's flashes to his seaside hometown. I've watched this film several times and on every occassion find something new. Here's a tip to enjoy watching a foreign film - Do NOT watch the English dubbed version if there is any - so much is lost in the film. Fellini's films work with subtitles because they make you forget you're reading them at all and as always, Fellini pleases both eye and ear and subsequently the heart. The musical score by Nino Rota is something one looks forward to in every scene. His music perfectly sets the tempo of each image, and I mean each and every one. What a duo of artistic genius these two men are! Watching the film on its excellent Criterion-restored DVD version, one can only wonder what the cinema world would be without Fellini.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By J. Brackett on May 5, 2007
Format: DVD
The theme of this story is the compassion that allows close-knit, small-town Italians in the 1930's to lead a meaningful existence in the context of Fascist oppression and economic hardship.

This story is culturally valuable because it shows the beauty of meaningfully existing, unchanged, amid destructive and oppressive forces. When a peacock lands in the snow with its beautiful, vibrant blue and green feathers, it exemplifies beauty, simply existing, within harsh conditions. The point of the story is not that the characters of this small Italian town make any world-altering advances, but rather that they maintain what they already have and admire--their sense of community and individual compassion--despite oppressive odds. Fellini gives his audience mischievous adolescents, oblivious teachers, a "crazy" uncle, a humorous grandfather, an idealistic and extremely feminine beauty, a generous but sickly mother and her easily-angered husband, dissatisfied workers, a story-telling lawyer, a prince, and a lying snack vendor. And none of these characters is ever treated inhumanely, or as being of any less value than any other. The uncle has an episode in which he climbs a tree and throws rocks at people who try to get him down, all the while yelling, "I want a woman!" Hours pass and the doctor who eventually comes to get him down remarks, "He has normal days, and he has not normal days...Just like us." Through the interaction of these characters, Fellini allows his audiences to encounter a town, the families, a community, and the simple life that exists within it. This film is powerful because it is saying that one does not have to defeat oppression to be worthy of being a model, seen and honored. You have only to live, to be yourself--which means to create--to be something powerful and moving.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Garris on June 10, 2004
Format: DVD
Like 8 1/2 before it, Amarcord marks an extremely personal film for Fellini. Like his relationship to Guido in 8 1/2, the character of Titta serves as an extension of Fellini on film. Whereas Guido served as an extension of Fellini's state of mind, Titta serves as an extension of Fellini's childhood memories.
Through the retelling of emotional stories that deal with Titta and his family, Amarcord (which translates into "I Remember") presents a cyclical collage of wondrous nostalgia for the Italy of Fellini's childhood. Starting in the spring and ending their one year later with the return of the yearly "puffballs", we are presented with and touched by the many experiences that Titta comes face to face with.
At the same time, the film is much more than a mere visual presentation of Fellini's own nostalgia, for it also questions the true validity of one's own memories. This questioning of memory by Fellini is made apparent in the manner in which single scenes can go from "reality" based to fantasy-like parody back to "reality" based in a manner of moments.
One of the more noteworthy examples of this technique is the scene in which El Duce visits the local town square. In the scene the serious yet joyous procession of El Duce eventually turns into a comedic/fantasy experience in which schoolchildren are shown happily carrying guns in the imagined wedding of two schoolchildren in front of a giant talking Mussolini head. Moments later the film cuts to nightfall, in which the local Fascists soldiers wreak havoc on the town and afterwards interrogate and beat Titta's father. Depending on Fellini's own presentation of the Italian Fascists, (and just as importantly, the view in Italy towards the Fascists at that time) very different interpretations can be read of them.
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Format: Blu-ray
Federico Fellini, the legendary Italian filmmaker and screenwriter known for cinema masterpieces such as "The White Sheik" (1952), "I Vitelloni" (1953), "La Strada" (1954), "Nights of Cabiria" (1957),"La Dolce Vita" (1960), "8 1/2' (1963), etc.

Fellini's films are known for capturing ethereal storylines, fantasy that binges on desire and his films are among those that have tested viewers but also has provided many cineaste with visual delight from the films that are from his oeuvre. His influence has inspired Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, David Lynch, Tim Burton, Pedro Almodovar to name a few and while many think of "La Dolce Vita", "8 1/2', "I Vitelloni" as the top of Fellini's career, there are many who feel that "Amarcord" is one of his most personal. "Amarcord" is also the third film for Fellini that won an Oscar for "Best Foreign Film" but also won multiple awards throughout the world and is perhaps one of his most accessible film for cinema fans worldwide.

The film was the fourth DVD release for The Criterion Collection back in 1999 and received a special re-release featuring more special features in 2006. In 2011, a Blu-ray release of "Amarcord" including the special features from the 2006 DVD release is now available in the U.S.

While not an autobiography, the film mirrors Fellini's life as a child and teenager growing up in Rimini, Italy (a seaside town in the province of Emilia-Romagna) during the time of Fascist Italy.

"Amarcord" is not the easiest film to describe because it's one of those films that must be experienced. The film can be seen as a coming-of-age film but also a film that has your typical villagers that everyone knows their name because of their actions or their body.
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