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Amazing You: Getting Smart About Your Private Parts Hardcover – May 5, 2005


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Amazing You: Getting Smart About Your Private Parts + I Said No! A kid-to-kid guide to keeping your private parts private + Your Body Belongs to You
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Juvenile (May 5, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525473890
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525473893
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 11.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (121 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,958 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 1–This title tackles basic body awareness and sex education. The text speaks directly to young children, differentiating between body parts that are visible most of the time and those that are kept hidden, showing the differences between girls and boys and offering a simple explanation of how babies are made without explicit reference to sex. Cravath's sunny cartoons show the various parts in a straightforward manner, though preschoolers may be confused about where the internal ones are. The text also uses terms such as "vagina" and "urinate" without actually explaining what they mean, and, curiously, the text does not discuss breasts at all, though there are side-by-side illustrations of a boy and girl in the baby, preschool, and adult stages. An author's note advises parents on the finer points of discussing these delicate issues. Though Laurie Krasny Brown's What's the Big Secret?: Talking about Sex with Girls and Boys (Little, Brown, 1997) remains the gold standard for sex ed for young children, this book is a friendly supplement or a nice starter for parents who aren't quite ready to go into the detail provided in Brown's book.–Kathleen Kelly MacMillan, Maryland School for the Deaf, Columbia
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

PreS-Gr. 2. This upbeat picture book, illustrated with sunny cartoon drawings, introduces kids to basic reproductive physiology. Saltz offers simple, accessible definitions of terms, accompanied by pictures of unclothed kids and labeled diagrams of internal organs. Subsequent drawings show three stages of body development from baby to young adult, followed by an abbreviated explanation, illustrated with a heart-shaped drawing of a smiling egg and sperm, of reproduction: "When a man and a woman love each other and decide that they want to have a baby, a man's sperm joins with a woman's egg. From the egg and sperm, a baby will grow." The book is more specific about birth: "The baby will come out of the mother's vagina, which is very, very stretchy." Saltz presents the information clearly in a cheerful, positive tone, encouraging kids to learn about their private parts and reassuring them that curiosity and touching themselves (in private) is natural. For a slightly older audience, Dori Hillestad Butler's exemplary picture book My Mom's Having a Baby (2005) explains the facts of life in more detail. Gillian Engberg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

Very simple and easy for any age to understand!
misty
So I had her take the book to her room and read it herself.
D. N. Callahan
I read it to my 5 year old and 8 year old boys.
Christina M. Davis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

150 of 157 people found the following review helpful By Laura J. Johnson VINE VOICE on March 7, 2006
Format: Hardcover
My 3 year old and I like this book quite a bit. I'm a pretty liberal mom so the graphic yet tasteful illustrations of private parts and the frontal nudity of grown adults doesn't bother me in the least nor does it seem to faze her. Some adults might be freaked out by this so I wouldn't give it as a gift unless you're sure the parents won't faint from embarrassment.

I was a bit bothered by a few things though such as the sentence, "But what about the other parts, the parts that nobody else but you sees?"

I don't think there are any preschoolers who are the soul viewer or toucher of their private parts. I still need to do hygiene on my daughter, as do her grandparents, and preschool teachers. And, of course, the doctor sees her private parts. I think this book missed an opportunity to explain when and who it is appropriate to show one's genitals to and when it's inappropriate.

There is an illustration of an ovum with a face drawn on it. This may not be a big deal but my daughter was confused by the bodyless head. And trying to explain it was a bit difficult.

One other thing was this passage, "The baby will come out of the mother's vagina, which is very, very stretchy. It stretches wide enough for the baby to come out and then goes back to the way it was before." Well--I wasn't very, very stretchy. My daughter was born by c-section as (If I am correct) 20% of babies are now a days. I would have liked to have seen c-sections mentioned since there are so many kids that come into the world this way.

I'm really just mildly nit-picking this wonderful book. The few problems I have mentioned as bothering me can be turned around and be grounds for starting a dialogue with your child.
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94 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie Wheat on June 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was considering buying this for my 3.5 year old, but i was flipping through the pages, and only saw circumcised penises. I have an intact son, so i decided to not buy it.
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on August 7, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I thought it was a good book, and that it really taught me about my private parts, but I think it was really meant for kids younger than me only because I'm 8 years old.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By D. Platt on May 18, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I was looking for a book to use to start talking with my almost 5-year-old about sex. I thought this book was great. It has age-appropriate cartoons and text. I thought that after reading it to my daughter she might have some questions, but she seemed to take it in stride. We've always spoken without embarrassment about body parts and the introduction of the idea of eggs and sperm or babies coming through a vagina didn't seem to phase her. The book does not mention intercourse, which was fine because she didn't ask how the egg and sperm met or arrived in the uterus, so I guess that will come later. When I added that it did hurt when my vagina stretched for her and her brother to come out she said, "oh man, I'm only going to have one baby then." Her little brother looked at the cartoon of the baby in the uterus, pointed to the umbilical cord and said, "baby penis." Funny. I think it's a great introduction and starting point for other conversations (c-sections, circumcision, nurse-midwives, etc.)
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By C. Stokes on May 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I have two daughters, 3 ˝ and 4 ˝ yrs. old. My older daughter wanted to know what "the parts that I can't see are". This placed me in a slightly uncomfortable position because it brought up the fact that I have absolutely no parent training in this department. Growing up in an extremely conservative environment, I was raised not to even admit there were private parts. To be honest, I think that the area was considered more of a void. Since my mother was a Science teacher, we had all of our other body parts just no privates to "speak" of.

So I set out to find a book that would be age appropriate, would not treat the subject as if their private parts as if there might be something dirty about it, would still give my daughters the understanding that there is something private/special about the parts that they own, and have my daughters understand that ultimately the parts have the special ability to create life. Honestly, I thought that this may be too much to want from a book that I intended to read to little people. Well, I got lucky. I happened to be listening to the radio when Gail Saltz was being interviewed. During the interview, she was explaining that she is working on a series of books to help in the arena of the subject of private parts and the body. She went on to explain that the first book, Amazing Parts, was available and was intended just for preschoolers. I looked it up on Amazon and decided to buy it because she did not seem like a weirdo and the book sounded like it could be decent.

The book came and I sat down with both girls. I read through the book with them and went through the illustrations. Since my 4 ˝ year old is in the "babies are so cute" stage, she really enjoyed knowing that the parts are responsible for making babies.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By . on February 14, 2014
Format: Paperback
Some parents may be squeamish about teaching their children anatomy in this level of detail, but I appreciate the thoroughness of the female anatomy portions. I had great difficulty with the portions on male anatomy, which exclude the most intricate part of the penis (and certainly the most captivating for little boys to play with): the foreskin. Penises are depicted with neat little knobs of scar tissue on the end, with no indication that this is anything other than natural.

It reminded me of an adult anatomy book I encountered in my travels in Egypt which depicted female anatomy without a clitoris. Though characteristic of circumcision-normative societies, I find these sorts of omissions to be chilling. A young boy can't possibly "get smart" about his private parts when the authors themselves are missing vital information about his anatomy. With American circumcision rates on a steep decline, parents a generation from now will find this book not only useless, but unacceptable.
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