Customer Reviews

181
4.6 out of 5 stars
AmazonBasics 67-Inch Monopod
Price:$14.99 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

69 of 71 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon June 5, 2014
EVALUATION
This is a full-size monopod---not a gorilla of a monopod, but full-size. Ironically the very same monopod is sold under different brandnames as a "light weight", as a "heavy duty", and as a "professional" monopod---it is NONE of these. Given that it is actually an average weight (at best), light-duty, amateur monopod, it is an excellent design, and a very good value.

The monopod is NOT "professional grade", meaning that it probably will NOT stand up to abuse, and/or constant use, and/or a heavy cameras with a 1000mm lens. Nevertheless a careful pro who occasional uses a monopod for a small to medium-size camera (or is careful to balance larger loads) would probably be very pleased with it. It does everything a monopod should do, and does those things well. It operates quickly and easily, and is very sturdy, proving solid support. Read the 1-star reviews carefully, but take them "with a grain of salt."

IDENTICAL MONOPODS WITH OTHER BRANDNAMES (may be cheaper)
Except for a very slightly different grip, the AmazonBasics is absolutely identical with the Vivitar VIV-VT-67 67-Inch Monopod or Opteka Opteka MP100 67" Professional Heavy Duty Photo / Video Monopod. Except for a green case, the the Dolica Dolica WT-1003 67-Inch Lightweight Monopod is identical to the other brandnames. Exactly the same monopod is sold under the "Digital Pro" brandname.

VITAL STATISTICS
>Length: 21 ¼" long fully-collapsed; 67" tall fully extended
>Diameter: uppermost section is 1"; foam grip 1 3/8"; strap ferrule 1 ½"
>Weight: 14 oz; case 3 oz; total 17 oz

FEATURES
>Maximum Height: 67". More than tall enough for most purposes.
>Minimum Height: 21", 23--24" with a (virtually required) ballhead/tilt-head. Is a little tall for some closeup nature subjects.
>Head (camera threads, etc.): The design is odd, with an free-wheeling plastic collar around a small metal stem (and camera threads), the collar is free-wheeling so that it will not scratch the base of your camera--but you still have to rotate the monopod or your camera to screw them together, or apart. (A few confused reviewers thought that they could just turn the collar to attach/detach the camera, and when that didn't work, they thought it was broken. Turning the collar doesn't do anything, that's just the way it is).
>Lanyard: adequate for hanging the monopod from a hook, but too weak to rely on for as a walking stick hand strap.
>Grip: Foam rubber, provides good grip and cushion.
>Body: Channels prevent rotation.
>Thumb locks: Operate quickly and smoothly, and lock securely---actually mine works just a tad too easily. I fear that with a little wear, that the locks will slip. Unlike the less-convenient "twist to lock" design (used on many other monopods/tripods), you can't just "twist harder"---there is nothing you can do if the lock doesn't hold. Honestly, I am torn about applying a little silicon grease to the locks to minimize wear, and the concern that the grease might encourage slipping. If you get one with tight leg locks, the silicon grease is highly recommended, it will both make the action smoother and protect against wear---lightly apply to the levers where they rub against the monopod column. Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-up Grease - 3 oz. Note that unlike petroleum grease, silicon grease does not damage plastic or attract dirt.
>Tip: Metal tip for hard surfaces; plastic tip screws out over metal tip for indoor surfaces. Neither tip can come loose and get lost. The metal tip is not particularly sharp, and the plastic tip is not soft. That is, the metal tip might slip on smooth rocks or hard ice, and while the plastic tip will protect most indoor surfaces from scratches, it does little to protect your camera from the jarring of impacts (which is VERY bad for cameras). Therefore it is best NOT to leave your camera on your monopod if you use the monopod as a walking stick. A "quick connect" such as Sima Quick Connect for Tripod can be handy.
>Case: Rugged, attractive black nylon, with full-length zipper and an adjustable shoulder strap. Unfortunately the case will not close with a ball head attached. The usual plastic fittings will not rust, but can be broken by abusive use.

AS A TRAVEL MONOPOD
At 21" collapsed the monopod is too large to fit in most airplane carry-on luggage. Airport security will probably confiscate it if found. 17oz is on the heavy side for travel. For travel, I use a very similar Norazza Monopod-lightweight TD140, which collapses to 15 ½" x ¾" diameter, weighs only 7oz, but is too short (52") for birding and some other situations.

AS A TRAVEL MONOPOD / WALKING STICK / HIKING POLE
A proper hiking pole needs a substantial strap, so that you do not have to have a death-grip on the grip for hours at a time. The supplied lanyard is totally inadequate for this purpose and cannot be replaced with a more substantial strap. However, if use a ballhead, you can install the ends of a replacement strap beneath the ball head. I have not found replacement straps for sale---but you can make one from a 12" length of 1" black nylon webbing you probably have lying around form old equipment---use a soldering gun to cauterize 1/4" holes in the webbing, 1/2" from each end. For travel, when I will be hiking, I use a Stansport Outdoorsman Trekking Pole which has camera threads (and therefore can be used as a monopod), and has a very sharp metal tip for gripping ice or rocks and a very shock absorbing rubber tip for indoor surfaces (but I use the rubber tip outdoors to protect my camera from jarring).

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORY
MANY reviewers report that the head (where your camera screws onto the monopod) can break off attached to your camera, and then can be difficult to remove from your camera. The best insurance against damage to your camera is to use a ball-head or tilt head, which I consider essential anyway (or a "quick connect" see above). For example, Professional Mini Ball Head Camera Mount which is adequate for small to medium-size cameras. Unfortunately the monopod will not fit in the case with the ball-head attached. The silicon grease I mentioned earlier will also make the action of a ball head smoother---usually only a concern shooting video on a tripod, but it's worth knowing. But keep the silicon very far from your lens---it may be very difficult to remove.

BALL HEAD OR TILTHEAD
For video, when you will never take verticals---a tilt head is by far the best solution, the limited motion is more controllable. Manfrotto 234 Monopod Tilt Head (Replaces 3232) But for stills, when you may want to take an occasional vertical, a ball-head is preferred. A compound tripod head offers both options, but requires at least three hands, one to hold the monopod, one (or two) to operate the head, and one for your camera---in contrast, you can hold the monopod and operate a ball-head or tilt-head with one hand.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have several tripods but when I discovered my first monopod, I was so happy. I really hate carrying a big clunky tripod and now only do it when shooting video. When I need the extra stability, I use a monopod and I've tried several different kinds.

Other than an expensive one that has little feet and, can in a pinch, do double duty, this monopod is my favorite. Some things I really liked (only one little flaw--not really a flaw, but I bought a "mini ball camera mount" so I could put a release plate on the base of my camera and leave a rotating "head" on the monopod so it can pan or tilt. But if you want to keep it fixed in place, you don't need anything--just screw it into the bottom of the camera

* It is so lightweight. I have a bit of a wrist problem, but this is effortless to carry, to set up and to use. It comes with a wrist strap, too, which means you can leave the case at home if you want, but...

* I like the case. It doesn't mention or show it on the product page so I thought it was a really nice surprise. It's lightweight nylon, black like the monopod, zips up the full length and has a short strap so you can carry it over your shoulder vertically, quiver-style.

* It's a great price

* I like the construction. Very nice, generous, spongy grip on the top. The bottom has a little spike so you can stabiiize better if you're outdoors. However, when you're inside or don't need the spike for support, the rubber base just easily screws down over it, given a more secure footing on a carpet or floor without making a hole in it.

* It's a great price. I've spent so much for monopods that were really too heavy (or, like gorilla pods, that were too light). This is so good with my camera (and takes weight up to 6.5 lbs.)

* It's easy to use. You just flip back the tab and slide down one...two...or three sections. Unextended it's about 20" and you can use the legs individually or in combination (they will also lock in place without being fully extended) so there's a lot of flexibility in how high you can take your camera. At maximum it goes to 5' 7", quite tall for most situations.

If you're not sure if you really want to use a monopod, this is so inexpensive to try out. It's also so unobtrusive that I just have been leaving it in the car, just in case. Definitely recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon February 3, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The Amazon Basics 67-Inch Monopod is basically (pardon the pun) everything you need in a monopod. It extends to a nice height and even at full extension it feels reasonably sturdy. Collapsing the thinnest section and using just the two thicker sections increases the stability greatly and still gives you a little over 51 inches to work with.

Build quality is decent. The locking cams are hard plastic but don't feel cheap and give a positive, tight lock when engaged. The foam grip isn't glued into place. It is just held in place by friction and the three screw heads that hold the camera mount to the monopod.

The monopod also includes a wrist strap held in place on the head of the mount by a split ring.

A carry bag is supplied. It's enough to protect the monopod though it's not padded and the shoulder strap is short enough to be more of a carry strap.

The rubber foot of this monopod can be retracted on its threaded mount to expose a metal spike foot for use in outdoor.

The only negatives I've found with this monopod are:
The wrist strap is rather small and I cannot fit it over my hand. For reference I wear a size large glove. For me this is more of a palm strap.

The soft foot has very little rubber extending past the end of the metal spike. I measured this at just slightly over 1mm. Moderate wear will surely leave the metal foot expose and potentially damage flooring.

All in all though this is an affordable and well built monopod and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 21, 2014
Verified Purchase
It's light weight, extends quickly and easily, relatively inexpensive and a nice overall monopod. I use it with my GoPro Hero 3 to keep it more steady than hand holding the camera while moving.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
Great piece of equipment. I tossed the idea around about getting a monopod. When I saw the price of this unit, I couldn't pass the deal! I shoot a lot of my son's baseball games and normally don't have the room for a tripod. This monopod is well-bought and can be used with my camera and my camcorder. It certainly has made shooting video at baseball games a lot better due to a steadier shot. We no longer get dizzy watching the replays at home (LOL!) I wish that I had this unit a LONG time ago. A great addition to my collection and would recommend this unit to anyone looking to assist them with their cameras/ camcorders. Not having to hold the camera or camcorder up all the time is a big help as well!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 25, 2014
Verified Purchase
I am not a professional photographer, but I do have several cameras and this thing works great with all of them, even my cumbersome Canon 60D. This monopod extends to be almost taller than me but collapses to a very compact size. It also comes with a nifty zippered nylon carrying case with a shoulder strap. It's well-built, solid and can be extended to any height within its range easily. The bottom can either be a rubber, non-slip foot or (with just a few turns) it can be turned into a metal spike for use on dirt, grass or sand. Seriously, unless you're a professional who needs some super high-end features, spend the 20 bucks and get this one.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon February 24, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have to first divulge that I am an extremely amateur photographer. I have never used a monopod before so I really had no idea what to expect. I was still trying to figure out what the point is for this contraption without the two extra legs until they were quickly reveled at my son's soccer game, where the audience was forced to remain on a slope. While another mother was fiddling with adjusting her tripod camera's legs to the slope, my pole was extended and placed and ready to shoot before she even got to her second adjustment. I was able to pivot my camera around the playing field with more ease and easily picked up the pole a few times to get a closer shot. I also noticed that I was able to get closer in crowds and later indoor aisles, due to the fact the monopod does not take up nearly as much space as a tripod does. What can I say? I am hooked. This is recommended for sports, crowed events and those adventures where you have no time or space to put a chunky tripod.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 8, 2014
Verified Purchase
Not meant for serious use. The description states that it will support over 6 pounds but on the second time I used it, a lens/camera combo that weighed around 4 pounds and it broke the metal mount and left the threads in the camera. Returning it to Amazon.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
I purchased this monopod for shooting in low light. I've had it for about two months and the center post just broke. The metal in the post is very brittle or this wouldn't have happened. I'm only glad it didn't happen with a camera (and lens!) on it. I had a ball head on it - I think it might have happened sooner with more serious consequences if I didn't have the ball head. It could have broken off and left the shaft in the base of the camera. As it was, I use a ball head with a quick mount and the camera was not mounted at the time. I let go of it, it hit the floor, and the center post broke just below the plastic spacer that is on the top of the monopod.

After looking around, I found the Vivitar VT 67 is very (!!!) similar, but with more attention to detail and less cost. The top spacer is not loose on the post (as this model is)and it has a metal collar to hold it in place, the tabs used to extend the legs are larger and the case is slightly better. I don't know if it will also have a brittle center post, but I doubt it because the biggest differences between the two is the higher attention to details on the Vivitar monopod. Other than that - they could be from the same factory.

Monopods are a good idea, don't let this steer you away from getting one for your digital camera. But be careful if you have a long telephoto mounted or a heavy camera. You may want to consider a more expensive, but stronger metal monopod for those situations.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon February 14, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I love photography- but I am not a huge fan of toting a tripod where ever I go- I find it cumbersome. This is a good alternative. The monopod does stabilize my photos and is easy to switch between cameras as I tend to shoot multiple cameras. None of my lenses are too heavy so this is a nice alternative to shooting freehand photos.

The monopod is adjustable in height by quite a bit and I have never ever in the short time I have been using it felt that it wasn't tall enough or short enough- so the built in height adjustments works well for me- and I am 5' 4". It's compact and lightweight so it's not bad to carry (and it comes with a handy carrying case- which frankly- I personally do NOT use at all). What is nice is the monopod also has a spike/rubber tip at the foot so that you can use it to secure the monopod on different types of surfaces. You can also use it as a light walking stick while hiking for those nature shoots.

I am pleased with this product and would recommend- as long as you don't have too heavy of a camera lens on it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 33 answered questions


Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.