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America: Who Stole the Dream? Paperback – June 1, 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 276 pages
  • Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing; Original edition (June 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0836213149
  • ISBN-13: 978-0836213140
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #180,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Dan E. Ross on February 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
America, Who Stole the Dream, was a WONDERFUL READ. I find myself leaning more to the right, from a political perspective, but the authors arguments are EXCELLENT at times and they definitely bring up some great points.
This book is the most well argued book I have read about the current demise of the middle class in the U.S. After reading it I would definitely have to say that I have more concern about political decisions being made in Washington as the authors illustrate that consistently the politicians don't do the right thing for the country.
The authors bring up several concerns
1. Middle class demise via outsourcing of manufacturing to lower cost areas
2. Growing disparity of wealth (the rich own more in % terms)
3. The outsourcing of the 'HIGH TECH JOBS' that are to be the savior of the country.
4. Commentary about various social programs set up and how ineffective they are.
In conclusion I would say this book was extremely well researched and I therefore give KUDOS to the authors. While I don't agree with everything they wrote I believe they have put forth an excellent piece of work.
My main contention with the book is that it focuses on the demise of manufacturing and low-end jobs, along with some high tech. The U.S. is expensive from a labor perspective. As we have outsourced much of our manufacturing we have been able to purchase products at cheaper prices in the U.S.. Imagine what some products would cost if we were paying for labor that was, in some cases, 10x higher than current wages in developing countries? NOWHERE in the book do the authors mention the BENEFIT to our standard of living because we can buy more with our dollars than we would be able to do so otherwise. In general, this book is WAY to the left so reader beware.
My background is a B.S. in Acct., an MBA in finance and current interests in economic and social policy development so I found this to be quite an interesting read.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
The book is another installment of the authors' concern for what might be called the `hollowing out of America'. Like the previous books, this one includes valuable facts and figures detailing the decline of America's working class. Much, however, is also repetitive, so not much new ground is broken. Nevertheless, the theme can support retelling since repercussions from the massive shifts in wealth and manufacturing continue to be felt throughout the land. It should also be noted that this decline is ongoing despite the so-called boom economy, whose benefits - as the numbers also show - have overwhelmingly flowed to one wealth bracket,. the upper 10%
One fresh feature in "...Dream" is the mounting assault on skilled high-tech salaries now underway. By and large, this is being done by either contracting out software programming to increasingly skilled Third World countries like India, or by importing these same skilled workers at a fraction of American salary. The latter operates under a legal cover that requires the company to advertise the job before turning to foreign workers as last resort. Apparently, however, compliance is left to the good faith of the company which unsurprisingly applies it insincerely. Viewed cynically, there is perhaps poetic justice in this whitecollar decline after the years of unchallenged blue-collar retreat.
The authors' discussion of the trade deficit reveals an important shortcoming in books such as this that focus mainly on statistics. As B&S show, the numbers indicate that the trade deficit continues to grow despite all the hand-wringing and tough-talk from Washington.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By snowleopard on October 22, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is little refuting the fact that over the last 15 years the split classes, between not just the rich and poor, but the rich and the working class, has grown sharply. Equally obvious is the control that big money has over every political level, on both sides of the political fence. What this marvelous book does is show specifically how this came to be, what policies caused it to be that way, and is loaded with in depth statistics cementing it's case. It also gives some good examples of how we might remedy the growing plutocracy.
I recommend this book for all working persons, regardless of your political stance.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By book lover on April 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
An accurate, yet disturbing, assessment of the cost of globalization. Corporate CEOs are selling out the American worker in order to increase shareholder value. People at all levels of organizations are being laid off while their jobs are shipped overseas. The book is very well researched and should be read by everyone in America from college age up.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is nothing but the truth so take the wool from your eyes and understand what is going on in this country where the government was formed to serve you, and now it seems that we are here to serve the government.
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