American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$19.53
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.95
  • Save: $7.42 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $3.83
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood Hardcover – June 26, 2014


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.53
$15.59 $16.15
Fall%20New%20Releases


Frequently Bought Together

American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood + Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food + The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell
Price for all three: $45.38

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Press HC, The; 1St Edition edition (June 26, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594204489
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594204487
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Wall Street Journal
This is Mr. Greenberg's ultimate goal--to get us to eat the seafood from our nation's bounty. He points to the remarkable fact that, "while 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat is foreign, a third of the seafood Americans catch gets sold to foreigners." In addition, he points out, "Americans now harvest our best, most nutritious fish in our best-managed Alaskan fisheries and send those fish over to Asia. In exchange, we are importing fish farmed in Asia, with little of the brain-building compounds fish eaters are seeking when they eat fish."

Tom Colicchio:
"This is on the top of my summer reading list A Fast Food Nation for fish.”

Washington Post:
“Americans need to eat more American seafood. It’s a point [Greenberg] makes compellingly clear in his new book.”

Kirkus Reviews:
"Blue Ocean Institute fellow Greenberg (Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food, 2010, etc.) offers an optimistic perspective on the connection between preserving our salt marshes and restoring America's offshore seafood production. The author presents three illustrative case studies: the effort to bring oysters back to our Eastern shores, the threat to Alaska's wild salmon industry from mining interests, and the effect of globalization on Gulf Coast shrimp. A fascinating discussion of a multifaceted issue and a passionate call to action."

***PRAISE FOR PAUL GREENBERG'S FOUR FISH***

Sam Sifton, The New York Times Book Review
“[Four Fish] is a necessary book for anyone truly interested in what we take from the sea to eat, and how, and why.”

Richard Eder, Los Angeles Times
“The signal quality of Greenberg’s book is its genial and sometimes despairing struggle with contradiction. Not many who argue for our planet’s endangered species also write the thrill of hunting them. Like the fish he once hooked, he plunges away and is reeled back. Four Fish is a serious and searching study. Written with wit and beauty, it is also play.”

NPR.org
“[An] excellent, wide-ranging exploration of humankind’s relationship with fish.”

The Seattle Times
“Greenberg’s saga, and his voice, are irresistible. A book that easily could have slid into cheap ideology or wonkiness instead revels in the tragicomic absurdity of nature, humans, and, of course, human nature. Yet it never shies away from the ugly, complicated truths of our modern world.”

About the Author

Paul Greenberg is the author of the James Beard Award-winning bestseller Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food and a regular contributor to the New York Times. He has been featured on NPR's Fresh Air and All Things Considered and has lectured widely on ocean issues at institutions ranging from Google to Yale to the U.S. Senate. He is currently a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation and a fellow with the Blue Ocean Institute.

@4fishgreenberg
paulgreenberg.org

More About the Author

Paul Greenberg is the author of the New York Times bestseller Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food. Four Fish has been published throughout Europe and Asia and was picked by The New York Times, The New Yorker and Bon Appetit as a notable book of 2010. Greenberg has just completed his next work, American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood (Penguin Press, June, 2014) a book that explores why the United States, the country that controls more ocean than any nation on earth imports 90 percent of its seafood from abroad. Mr. Greenberg writes regularly for the New York Times Magazine, Book Review and Opinion Page and also contributes to National Geographic, Vogue, GQ, The Times of London, Süddeutschen Zeitung, and many other publications. He has lectured widely at institutions around the country including Harvard, Yale, Google, The United States Supreme Court and The Monterey Bay Aquarium. Over the last ten years he has been a W.K. Kellogg Foundation Food and Society Policy Fellow, New York's South Street Seaport Museum's Writer-in-Residence and a fellow with the Blue Ocean Institute. He is the recipient of a James Beard Award for Writing and Literature, and a Grantham Prize Award of Special Merit. In 2014 he began a three year Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation during which he will write "The Omega Principle: The health of our hearts, the strength of our minds, and the survival of our oceans all in one little pill."

Twitter: @4fishgreenberg
Facebook: facebook.com/fourfish
Web: www.fourfish.org

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
27
4 star
15
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 45 customer reviews
Very well researched, written.
Amazon Customer
Greenberg urges increased consumption of locally caught wild seafood, since doing so will necessitate greater stewardship of the environment.
Amazon Customer
We're at a moment of unique opportunity.
Just Me

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By sneaky-sneaky VINE VOICE on June 30, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Paul Greenberg has apparently found his voice as an ichthylogical advocate, and has followed up his excellent 'Four Fish' with another book that involves three. The strength of 'American Catch' is its locovore leitmotif, three species that represent many of the ills that have befallen our food supply, food chain, ecosystems, eating habits, and eating habitats.
If we managed to reintroduce edible oysters to the New York City area, we could achieve several things, firstly, cleaner water, as these ancient bivalves filter fifty gallons a day each, and oystertectured shallows would mitigate both storm surges and rising seas. These calciferous reefs in turn harbor and shelter other species, so oysters are actually a keystone species, much like returning wolves to Yellowstone Park restored struggling trees by eating the deer that were eating the seedlings.
Tied into the coastal fate of oysters are salty tidal marshes that spawn a host of tasty piscines, and the most popular of all by weight, shrimp. We could grow all the shrimp we want here, but instead farm it out to Asia and China. The air in China is bad, the water is atrocious, and yet here we are eating shrimp, tilapia and catfish farmed there.
Finally, Mr. Greenberg covers Bristol Bay in Alaska, home to the last great salmon run, and the competing interests of mining corporations who promise to 'get it right this time.' In all a good book, and with some solutions presented, it's not all doom and gloom, we can educate consumers, prod government, and protect what's left.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert D. Harmon VINE VOICE on July 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is something of an environmental case study -- three, in fact -- and a compelling lesson in economics and marketing, told through three simple foods and their sources: oysters in the New York City estuaries, prawns in Louisiana and the oil-stained Gulf of Mexico, and salmon in far Alaskan waters. The author, as we see, has first-hand experience with the people and fisheries in all three areas and his report, from the scene, is compelling -- and concise and highly readable.

It's not just a story of environmental damage, though he tells it plainly enough: the pollution and sewage in New York harbor, the oil spill in the Gulf, and the threat of the gold and copper Pebble Mine proposal to the salmon fisheries in Alaska. We learn just how badly our export of our remaining seafood -- and our import of cheaper seafood, such that it is, from Asia and elsewhere -- has distorted our own fisheries, our food industries and our nutrition. We learn just how many local jobs and industries are affected, and we see, more clearly, just how much economic damage goes hand-in-hand with environmental degradation.

It is reversible, he says, but it will need a major change in mindset. This book helps; certainly the reader will think differently about what's on the dinner table. And the author is hopeful: "All that the sea asks of us," he writes, "is that we be wide in our harvest, recognize the limits of its bounty, and protect the places wehre seafood wealth is born. In return the sea will feed us and make us smarter, healthier, and more resilient in the process. Quite a covenant."

Highest recommendation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By sanoe.net VINE VOICE on June 6, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Paul Greenberg's "American Catch" is an intense read. Informative, sometimes overwhelming, at times depressing, on the state of America's seafood industry which has taken hits from several directions and Greenberg lays it all out. For anyone who wants to get a better idea of why environmental issues are important to business, this is a book for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 15, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is an exploration of the current state of the American seafood industry, focusing on the ecology of several representative species. Greenberg is a journalist and author who has written extensively about seafood. In this book, Greenberg investigates the reasons why 91% of the seafood that Americans eat comes from abroad, and how, nevertheless, we export a third of the seafood caught in American waters. Taking three species as examples, eastern oysters, Louisiana brown shrimp, and sockeye salmon, Greenberg delves into the historical factors that have led to a shift from locally supplied seafood products to imported. He compares historical to contemporary consumption patterns, showing how both ecological and societal changes have played a role in how we eat.

I found this book quite engaging and informative. Growing up in the seventies, I have always been very suspicious about the safety of local shellfish, especially mussels since they are eaten raw. Greenberg provides the backstory about how mussels, once a ubiquitous and common local food along the eastern seaboard came to be filled with pathogens, as well as how they may slowly be making a comeback, although still under threat from untreated sewage and overflowing storm drains. Greenberg's description of the ecological disasters wrought by international shrimp farming ventures should be an important wake up call. His investigation into ecological threats to Alaskan sockeye salmon shed light on the competition between big mining interests, food production, and future generations.

Greenberg urges increased consumption of locally caught wild seafood, since doing so will necessitate greater stewardship of the environment. I find increased consumption of fish hard to swallow, though, given that supplies are so limited.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?