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The American Cider Book Paperback – January 1, 1973


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (January 1, 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374510768
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374510763
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,040,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
Vrest Orton is a Green Mountain boy from Vermont, and he likes his cider - especially the hard stuff. Most of this book is devoted to old-fashioned English hard cidermaking. Tips such as using crabapples in hard cider to keep it from turning to vinegar are offered. Home hard cider makers won't like hearing that they must register with the IRS before making cider for home consumption. Sweet cider fans will find Orton's discussion on cider syrup helfpful, as well as the recipes for it, but it is too little too late.
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Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent concise reference for cider making and enjoyment. It begins with a short article on the history of cider, particularly in North America and New England. This is followed by a substantial chapter on methods of making cider in the past and in the present. This section also describes tools and machinery, as well as bottling and preserving cider. There is also a shorter chapter on methods and tools needed for small-scale home cider production. The last part of the book consists of a collection of various recipes that call for cider, from soup to main dishes, to pie. The book is amply illustrated with high-quality black-and-white drawings and photographs. End material includes a short appendix of suppliers for cider making equipment and an index.

This book is fun to read as well as informative. Certainly, the quality of the historical research is excellent, and the facts are presently very coherently. A wide variety of information is included, from types of apples to use for cider making, to characteristics of the ideal pomace, to bottling and preservation methods for both sweet cider and hard cider, and even methods for making apple cider vinegar. Orton bases his comments not only on his historical research, but also on his own experience, growing up and making cider on a traditional family farm. On certain topics, he has some very firm opinions, which he shares with readers. For example, he observes, "One of the most outlandish, and to me shocking, habits of the times we live in is that of swilling down drinks from up-lifted bottles. No civilized person guzzles from a bottle if a glass or mug is available.
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