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The American Expeditionary Forces in World War I (Battle Orders) Paperback – March 20, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: Battle Orders (Book 6)
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (March 20, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841766224
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841766225
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 7.2 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,257,970 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book summarizes just everything you need to know about the AEF in one slim, richly-illustrated volume." -Leonard Shurtleff, The Western Front Association

From the Publisher

Definitive guides to the actions and evolution of fighting forces, these comprehensive studies on the organisation, strength, command, deployment and evolution of forces in key military encounters, use a highly detailed 'unit-by-unit' examination.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R. A Forczyk VINE VOICE on June 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
John F. Votaw, a retired US Army officer, has written an excellent organizational study of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) in France in the First World War in Osprey's Battle Orders #6. This volume provides a wealth of detail information about the formation and composition of AEF units that make it a valuable adjunct to any of the recent, more in-depth studies of the US role in the First World War.

The volume begins with a focused "mission" analysis that discusses the role intended for the AEF, followed by interesting sections on the training of the AEF and its C3I. The author provides ten maps: the Western Front in 1917; AEF Divisional Training Areas; strategic features on the Lorraine Front; AEF services of supply; the Battle of Cantigny; initial plan of attack in the Aisne-Marne offensive; operations of the 1st and 2nd Divisions in the Aisne-Marne; attack on St. Mihiel; the Argonne offensive; and US positions at the armistice. However, the heart of the work are the numerous line and block charts that detail the composition of the AEF's units from army and corps level down to brigade and battalion level. The main focus is on AEF infantry and artillery units, although information is also provided on the tank corps, engineers, services of supply and air service. The author also provides detailed orders of battle for the 1st, 26th and 77th Infantry Divisions, as well as interesting sidebars on various US commanders. It is also apparent from the author's narrative, that significant friction existed in the AEF between the Regular Army and National Guard officers - an issue which never seems to go away.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pardus Amicus on October 11, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I got this book and from page 33 to page 48 there is instead part of a book on Montreal, possibly from the Fortress series. They are not inserted but actually replace the AEF pages. Otherwise the pictures and information are up to Osprey's usual standards.

This would appear to be a publishing problem, and something to question your seller about when you go to purchase this book.

In fact of all the Osprey volumes I own or have checked out I believe this is the first one with such a major problem.
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Format: Paperback
Military historian and author, George B. Clark's latest work examines the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) in World War I. The author's intent is to "supply information about what the American forces rendered to their comrades in arms, French and British, to bring World War I to a successful climax" (p.1).
The book is divided into two parts. Part I explains how an ill-prepared American Army transformed itself into a viable military force that successfully challenged German battlefield forces. Part II presents statistical and narrative data on the American divisions sent to France.
The book begins with a short, comprehensive review of the warring powers and the United States' political activities prior to our entry in April of 1917. By June of that year, the first American combat troops arrived in Europe and trained under either French or British tutelage on the intricacies of trench warfare. Their average training time, prior to engaging in combat related operations, was approximately four weeks, although some divisions had far less preparation time.
Later arriving divisions enjoyed six months of training prior to overseas deployment. They then underwent two months of training in France and another month manning a quiet sector before engaging in earnest combat. The 1.4 million men sent to France formed 29 divisions that actually participated in combat, with another 13 either providing replacements or witnessing no combat.
The book covers a host of issues related to the fourteen months of American participation in the conflict. Mr. Clark, for example, details the transportation system employed to bring the force to France along with statistical data showing the number of American troops shipping out from Canadian and American ports.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Warren Bajan on December 1, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are interested in the number of one mule water carts in a U.S. infantry brigade, buy this book. If the weapons interest you do not.
If you are interested in which regiments belonged to which divisions, or when they arrived, do not. If you are looking for any sort of useful order of battle, do not.
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