Buy Used
$15.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Bountiful Buys
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order. Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

American Grotesque: An Account of the Clay Shaw-Jim Garrison Affair in the City of New Orleans Hardcover – January 1, 1970


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$1,209.89 $0.04
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 669 pages
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster (1970)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671206842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671206840
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.7 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,515,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
3
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By IBR on June 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is an interesting book. Since it was written in 1970 information has surfaced that the author's access was arranged at the behest of Shaw and his supporters. Many of the subjects quoted have been revealed to be CIA and FBI contacts and informants, including Shaw himself! None of this is in the book and the book insufferingly takes everything uttered by Shaw and his Intelligence backed attorneys at face value, which renders the book useless as a historical document. However, as a day to day chronicle of the trial and a flavor for the city it is interesting but anyone who reads this has to read Bill Davy and Jim DiEugenio's work in order to find some balance. The truth lies somewhere in the middle and from what I have read the truth is much closer to the latter two author's work than the former.

Special note: pay attention to Kirkwood's reaction to the Clinton/Jackson witnesses. The press corp(according to Kirkwood) were worried that Shaw would be found guilty solely because of this evidence. That evidence is quite compelling to this day. Also note James Phelan and Hugh Ayensworth working 24/7 in New Orleans for Shaw's acquittal. Neither deserve the title "journalist".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By mark rowland on January 21, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I read this rag years ago and it found it's proper place in landfill. I may have to secure another copy now that I have started o collection of writers who act as the government mouth piece. This is a mouth piece writer probably one of Shaw's lovers but definitely sitting on that side of the courtroom during the trial, kirkwood was douped or paid and honestly I can't imagine who would buy into this supposition about THE GREATEST AMERICAN......Jim Garrison who made a stand and fought to keep the democracy that now is just a distant thought. This is a cover up book not worth the time unless you want a laugh or you are interested in the court proceedings which are valuable
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Rocco Dormarunno on June 8, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Author and playwright, James Kirkwood doesn't concern himself with ballistics, badge men and grassy knolls. He's not concerned with whether or not Oswald acted alone, or if he acted at all. In his eye-opening book, "American Grotesque: An Account of the Clay Shaw-Jim Garrison Affair in the City of New Orleans", Kirkwood is a court room witness of the case against Clay Shaw. In the process, he interviews several key players, including Clay Shaw, Jim Garrison, Perry Russo, and Judge Haggerty. The result is quite the opposite of the case as presented in Stone's film "JFK" or Garrison's book, "On the Trail of the Assassins". In Kirkwood's book, the case against Shaw is nothing less than a shame and a shameless persecution of an innocent man. Kirkwood doesn't pretend to hide his allegience to Shaw, but he allows the reader to draw his/her own conclusion. Fortunately, the outrage and sadness he feels about the case is hedged with a lot of humor and good old fashioned sarcasm. His parenthetical comments are brilliant!
Unfortunately, this book is out of print. However, try to pick up a used copy here, while they are still available.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Victor J. Bennetts on May 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I read this book over ten years ago when my wife and I were doing a big road trip through the south of the US. We were 'stranded' in New Orleans for a couple of weeks waiting for a cheap hire car return to come up and wiled away the time eating great food and checking out all the amazing things happening there daily.

One of the things we did was go to a film screening of an obscure documentary 'he must have something' on the Shaw case by a local amateur documentary maker. The JFK movie had just come out so it was topical at the time but we had no idea there was any connection between New Orleans and the Kennedy assassination so it was all news to us.

The film was great, a documentary that follows the book closely along similar lines with interviews of witnesses, lawyers, the judge etc. I wish I could get hold of it, but sadly I dont think it has ever been released. Like the book, it doesnt have much to say on the assassination, but a lot to say about the American legal system in the context of Louisiana and New Orleans.

At the screening the filmmaker recommended this book and we bought it later that day. My wife and I spent the next week or so reading it out to each other and we both loved it. We were both practicing lawyers at the time and could really relate as common lawyers from a very similar (but foreign)jurisdiction to the real life drama of the US legal process in action.

I particularly liked the judge in the case, because he was a pretty colourful character in a lot of ways, as many lawyers are, but was despite this highly principled in his execution of his duties and incapable of allowing unsound evidence to be admitted.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again