American History Revised and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $6.24 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good - Standard used condition book with the text inside being clean and unmarked - Exterior of the book shows moderate signs of usage
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

American History Revised: 200 Startling Facts That Never Made It into the Textbooks Paperback – April 6, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.75
$6.80 $2.43
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

American History Revised: 200 Startling Facts That Never Made It into the Textbooks + Unsolved Mysteries of American History: An Eye-Opening Journey through 500 Years of Discoveries, Disappearances, and Baffling Events + The Greatest Presidential Stories Never Told: 100 Tales from History to Astonish, Bewilder, and Stupefy
Price for all three: $40.35

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; 1 edition (April 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307587606
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307587602
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #86,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In 1995’s Lies My Teacher Told Me, James Leowen surveyed several popular American history textbooks and exposed their errors and falsehoods. Consider Morris’ book its sequel, or perhaps its progeny. Morris discusses topics that were left out of the history books: the way Amerigo Vespucci wound up being credited as the discoverer of America, for example (he was a tireless self-promoter), or the revolutionary anti-jamming communications system invented during WWII by Hedy Lamarr, the famous Hollywood actress. This is a deeply fascinating book, and one that should appeal to a broad spectrum of readers, from students to history buffs to trivia addicts. Some of Morris’ facts seem more like personal opinions, as when he calls General MacArthur’s failure to get court-martialed after Pearl Harbor (for ignoring orders to get his planes in the air) “the greatest government cover-up of all.” But whether he’s trading in documented facts or unsupported opinions, Morris tells a compelling story. --David Pitt

Review

 “This is a deeply fascinating book, and one that should appeal to a broad spectrum of readers, from students to history buffs to trivia addicts.”-- Booklist
 
 “Eye-opening, interesting and lively. If schools put it on the curriculum, kids would pay more attention… American History Revised should be required reading for anyone in public office, a potent reminder that real history, not the tabloid fodder sprayed across the nightly news, is often made far from the limelight.” -- Huffington Post  
 
 “American History Revised offers an overview of American history by focusing on many facts and episodes that, “startling” or not, do indeed often throw light on our peculiarly complicated country, its past, and, inevitably, it’s present and even future. I doubt that there is a single reader who won’t find many of the essays genuinely illuminating — Morris is a master of the concise essay — and often challenging. Morris is opinionated; few readers will agree with him in all of his opinions, but he is a wonderful person to engage with.”-- History Book Club 


 
 “Seymour Morris Jr. is certainly not the first to take a lateral look at the moments when the facts conflict with legend and choose to print the facts. He is, however, the most readable and authoritative. This is a lucid, provocative and thoroughly enjoyable book, full of eye-opening surprises and tantalizing what-ifs, which can be read cover to cover or dipped into like a box of favorite candies.” -- The BookWeb.com 
 
 
 “Many believe that history is inflexible and chiseled in stone.  The simple fact is that history is much more fluid. In fact, according to this fascinating book, history is generally filled with ironies, surprises, and misconceptions. Witty, lucid, and playful, this is a book that will leave you astonished, entertained, and, yes, enlightened.” -- Tucson Citizen 
 
“In his new book, Seymour Morris Jr. shows that American history is like an iceberg, with the best parts long hidden from view. American History Revised is as informative as it is entertaining and humorous. Filled with irony, surprises, and long-hidden secrets, the book does more than revise American history, it reinvents it.” -- James Bamford, best-selling author of Puzzle Palace

"In American History Revised, author Seymour Morris, Jr. delivers useful and entertaining snippets of American history. The reader learns of a news story, broke to eastern newspapers in 1861 by a young Mark Twain, who later saw his novel Huckleberry Finn banned from several public libraries (a fact which only made them sell faster). With reverence, Morris tells of the U.S. aircraft carrier Yorktown, nearly sunk by the air-raid on Pearl Harbor, repaired and re-fitted in 68 hours by 1,400 men.
“The people and events chosen for this book meet two criteria: they are largely unknown, and they make a point worth remembering.”
Business-minded folks would do well to pick up this piece for a hefty dose of inexpensive financial advice. One is informed that Howard Hughes was not entirely self-made but “got a leg up” from his father, who not only invented a unique oil-drilling bit, but unlike many inventors, the man refused to sell the invention, instead making a fortune renting the bits out to drilling companies. The author also points out that the patient investors that held onto their stocks even after the great crash of 1929 “made out like bandits.”
If anything, these pages reminds us that if humans indeed learn from our past–in order not to repeat mistakes–then history books lacking these facts should be swiftly updated." - San Francisco Book Review

More About the Author

Seymour Morris Jr. is an international business entrepreneur and former head of corporate communications for the world's largest management consulting firm. His articles on management and leadership have appeared in numerous magazines and books.

His first book, "American History Revised," was published by Random House in 2010. Now a full-time historian, he has written his second book about one of the greatest acts of American leadership. "Supreme Commander: MacArthur's Triumph in Japan" is being published by HarperCollins in April 2014.

He holds an A.B. in American History from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School. He lives in New York City.

www.seymourmorrisjr.com


Customer Reviews

That is the promise, but unfortunately there are a few errors in the books, so don't use it as a reference.
Ian Rushton
Mr. Morris' book is a wonderful addition to the library of any American history buff - no matter the level of personal knowledge.
Ctwink
This book is written very much in the "bet you didn't know" style and does make for a good and interesting read.
Dan Sherman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Kristi G. TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 15, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is very well written, from the angle of story telling. It is easily readable; it is not in the least boring, or hard reading.
Some have talked about it being a coffee table book, but I found it did better around here as a bathroom book. Everyone started reading it when I left it by the tub, including my 14 year old son.
Where it really shines, in my opinion, is discussing some business aspects of history. The story of George Eastman alone was well worth my time reading this book. What an amazing character he was! I'd never heard of him- of course he is NOT in the textbooks. They should put him in textbooks though, he's quite a role model! There's some nasty little tidbits too - like US Generals that hire themselves out to foreign countries.
I did find that the book kinda flicked around though, for example, it went from war to business to politics, to war. It was great to read first this story, and then that story, but I don't know if one TRIED to read it cover to cover if they could make much sense of the organization of the book. I never could really get a fix on that.
That said, the way it is encouraged in depth memorable short reading, and I liked it just the way it was very much, as did the family.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Loveitt on March 5, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Well, the title is a bit of a hyped-up tease (most of the facts are interesting rather than startling), but this is an entertaining collection of tidbits. Even if you are a history buff you are likely to find things here that you didn't know. For example, did you know that a husband and wife by the name of Rathbone were in Lincoln's box the night Lincoln was assassinated? Not only that, but that John Wilkes Booth stabbed Mr. Rathbone? (Later in life Rathbone lost his mind and wound up killing poor Mrs. Rathbone.) Ok...I have to admit that one was startling! But will anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of baseball history be "startled" to learn that Babe Ruth started out as a really good pitcher? No. Sometimes the author stretches a point, as when he says that if John Kennedy had not been assassinated he would have definitely gotten us out of Vietnam. Most of what I've read on the topic states that Kennedy was of 2 minds about this and kept going back and forth on his policy. Another interesting thing was to learn that Bobby Jones, the great amateur golfer, once called a one-stroke penalty on himself for accidentally touching and moving his golf ball. The rules official didn't see it and didn't want to call the penalty, but Jones insisted and wound up losing the tournament by one stroke. As you can see, the book tends to be a bit uneven and you may have to take some of the author's opinions, stated as fact, with a grain of salt. Overall, however, this is a fun and interesting read and most importantly it will probably get you to the point that you want to read more about the people and topics covered in the book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Dan Sherman VINE VOICE on March 17, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book really is a set of "fun facts" about American history that is very easy to read in short bits and is likely to leave you wanting to learn more about different topics. It really is not a systematic overview of American history and does not try to present a "viewpoint" other than "did you know this?" My favorite teacher ever was an AP history teacher back in high school who really kept the interest of the class (to the extent that he presented additional classes at the request of students after school during the final week of senior year). His technique was to tell us a lot of fun facts and unusual "stories" around key figures in history that made history live in a way that usual recitations of events did not. This book is written very much in the "bet you didn't know" style and does make for a good and interesting read. The approach really kept me interested in history many years later and this book could well have the same effect on others.

Very good for what it is! You will enjoy it! Four stars!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
45 of 57 people found the following review helpful By AO on June 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
American History Revised-200 Startling Facts That Never Made It Into the Textbooks- is an interesting read that shows much promise but unfortunately suffers from a combination of poor research and poor editing. To be fair, the author is not a professional historian (nor is this reviewer) but when writing a book purporting to tell stories that "did not make it into the textbooks" it is to be expected that one should get one's facts straight. A few examples:
* In discussing Pearl Harbor, the author refers to "one such officer-Corporal George Mooney". Is the author unaware that a corporal is not an officer, or was Mooney in fact a Captain or other rank?
* The author refers to "an American Admiral" in 1813, although there were no Admirals in the U.S. until the 1860's.
* The author refers to JFK winning the Pulitzer Prize for "Why England Slept". In fact he won for "Profiles in Courage".
* Twice he confuses the battle of Antietam with Gettysburg-referring to the "three day battle" of Antietam and claiming R. E. Lee would "never again launch a sustained offensive" after Antietam. What then was the Gettysburg campaign?
* In similar vein, he cites as R. E. Lee's "one brilliant victory"-Chancellorsville. What about the Seven Days, Second Manassas, Fredericksburg?
* He claims both George Washington and Ulysses Grant were 5-star generals. In fact, all holders of that rank were from the 1940's.
* He sometimes seems not to have read his own stories. Once he informs the reader that the British losing the Revolutionary War was a surprise since they had only lost one significant battle-Yorktown. Several pages later, he refers to the American victory at Saratoga as "the turning point" of the war.

In sum, the book is worth the read, but the reader is well advised to check out any of the 200 stores elsewhere before repeating them. In general they may be correct but the details are often wrong and the subject of sloppy research and editing.
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews