Customer Reviews


352 Reviews
5 star:
 (282)
4 star:
 (61)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you liked the Walter Isaacson book "Steve Jobs", you are going to love this one on Alan Mulally. Both are of similiar quality
I highly recommend that you read this book and fully agree with what the other positive reviewers are saying about it. This book itself was not just a good read about a stalwart man, and an incredible company, it is an epic tail of a Great American Manufacturing Dynasty brought back from the brink of extinction. Reading it really inspired me to learn even more about...
Published on February 11, 2012 by S. Power

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Great read for a student of business
Although I knew the outcome of this story, I enjoyed the narrative Mr. Hoffman weaved out of the many facts in this account. Well-written and fast-growing, this book gives a chilling account of how close Ford came to bankruptcy and how Mullaly's disciplined approach saved it. I'd always known how dysfunctional Ford was because my dad worked there for thirty years, so...
Published 9 months ago by Amazon Customer


‹ Previous | 1 236 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you liked the Walter Isaacson book "Steve Jobs", you are going to love this one on Alan Mulally. Both are of similiar quality, February 11, 2012
By 
S. Power (Austin, Texas, United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I highly recommend that you read this book and fully agree with what the other positive reviewers are saying about it. This book itself was not just a good read about a stalwart man, and an incredible company, it is an epic tail of a Great American Manufacturing Dynasty brought back from the brink of extinction. Reading it really inspired me to learn even more about Mulally, The Ford Motor Company, and their products. After reading the book, or while you wait for it to arrive, check out some of the videos and movies about Alan Mulally on the internet. His appearances at local universities, on late night talk shows, and in a documentary done about his work at Boeing all make for really interesting supplements to this book.

This book is different from, but every bit as well done as Walter Isaacson's book on Steve Jobs. Both of the biographies are appealing in many of the same ways. You get a history lesson, a solid business book, a solid overview of the automotive industry, a human interest story, and a biography not just of Mulally but also of other key people in the industry. You also get a really fully developed business case study that demonstrates the lessons of teamwork, core competency, strategic management, benchmarking, business ethics, the importance of liquidity among many other concepts. Although Steve Jobs and Alan Mulally are as different as two men can be, I see similarities in their importance, vision, and impact on the World. Their biographers and their biographies are also very different, but again similar in quality and importance.

The factual accuracy of this book seems to be very good. Bryce Hoffman has a lot of credibility in this part of the country and it doesn't seem that he has any agenda except to tell the story and write a good book. At times, he seems to be exaggerating the dichotomy of how bad Ford was and how great Alan Mulally and Bill Ford were, but a lot of people I know deep inside ford have the same opinions. I don't think that the author has any nefarious agenda in writing this book, and he is so hard on the automotive insiders in this country that I don't think anyone will accuse him of being self-serving. In the last chapter he does a nice job of pointing out how no one man saved Ford and reaffirming the strengths that some of the 'characters' brought to the situation.

The entire book is suspenseful and captivating from start to finish and in the events or perspective of each chapter. There are really funny anecdotes throughout the book and more than enough drama to keep even fiction readers interested. There is also a lot in this book that will make for worthy quoting. The chapter starters are all relevant quotes from Henry Ford himself, but there are also a lot of very useful and powerful quotations from more recent people, events, and situations.

The biography is written in a non-sequential style that can be a little unwieldy because it requires that you really keep on your toes about how the events relate as they are addressed in the various chapters. Despite this small flaw, or choice of style, the book is well organized, and I think the author made the right decision, overall in the presentation of the information. Just be prepared to have to go back sometimes to refresh your memory about where in time the topics that are being discussed occurred.

These two biographies, this one and Isaacson's, are the most thorough and well done books in a very long time. I highly recommend that you read this one and consider tabbing it as you go. I wish I had tabbed mine as I went. There is certainly a lot of information that I'll be referring back to as I try to emulate some of Mulally's successes and avoid the pitfalls that are highlighted.

If there was anything that you wanted me to cover in this review that I failed to, please let me know in the comments and I'll go back and cover them. I want this to be useful for you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, page-turning, idea-inspiring!, March 1, 2012
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Simply put, this book is a page-turner. And that's not what you'd normally expect from a business book. But there's a great story here, well told, that excites the mind.

There hasn't really been a bigger story in the last half-decade than the economy, and along with the banking and housing sectors, America's "big three" automotive manufacturers have been key players in that story. But amid an economy in decline and two cross-town rivals falling toward default, Ford managed to plot a different course. This book is the story of that startling rebirth. It briefly chronicles the history of Ford, appraising its ups and downs and the resulting corporate culture its history had created. And it looks at the trouble it was facing (along with the rest of the auto industry) in the mid 2000s. But things took a decisive change for Ford when Bill Ford Jr. volunteered to step aside as CEO and bring in outside help. And the person he tapped for that responsibility was Alan Mullaly, a top executive who had just led a resurgence at Boeing.

American Icon is really three books in one: It is an interesting piece of modern American history, chronicling the inside workings of a key economic player in the midst of historic economic troubles throughout the country and the world. It is also a business book, with thoughtful and inspiring ideas for rethinking corporate culture, business workflows, and entrenched mindsets with cross-functional teams, openness, responsibility, and a carefully focused but always updating plan. And third, it is an interesting biography of both Bill Ford Jr. and Alan Mullaly, giving insight into their personalities and approaches to business.

Mulally's ideas of emphasizing simplicity, comporting vision with reality, and demanding open collaboration and communication among team members worked wonders at Ford. He paints a compelling picture of how a corporate structure (at whatever level) could work constructively and agilely to effect productive change and breed success. I often had to put the book down so I could jot down ideas for making some of his principles work in my own workplace. This business book almost pulls new ideas out of you by stimulating your thinking; at least, it did for me.

I loved this book, and am happy to enthusiastically recommend it. It's a fascinating case study in successful business coupled with compelling modern history told as a fast-moving story. You will not be bored; in fact, you'll be pulled in to Mulally's vision as you see it unfold before you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Visionary, March 6, 2012
By 
sneaky-sneaky (Moscow on Hudson) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Simply put, Ford is now exciting. Bryce Hoffman explains why and how. Alan Mullally was brought in to save a legend from itself, and he did just that. The Mulally model will probably be studied and taught for decades. Ford's culture was poisonous at so many levels. Bad products, bad policies, and a toxic culture of backstabbing and oneupmanship had culminated in what would be an inevitable end. Executives bugged each other's offices, phones were tapped, vehicles were overproduced and later sold at discounts; and that culture was decades old. Henry Ford started it all when a bunch of guys went behind his back, made some improvements to the Model T, and delivered a prototype. Ford destroyed it with a sledgehammer.
Bryce Hoffman was given unprecedented access and provides direct quotes from many of the defining moments and situations that occurred over the last decade, including talks with the Chrysler and GM CEOs, Ben Bernanke, Hank Paulson, candidate Obama, the Ford heirs, and so on. There have been complaints that the book is overly optimistic bordering on worshipful. Well, all you need to do is look at the product. I walked around a dealership. Ford's new vehicles look great, and the company now has the highest quality rating for a non-luxury brand. In the book you read about the current advertising campaign that was conceived several years ago. Ford started off with 'One Ford' or something, and as quality improved, Mulally wanted to move to interviews with customers impressed with the new product; in other words using actual customers to sell great vehicles. And that is exactly what is happening today.
Mr. Hoffman has been an auto industry reporter for a number of years and knows what stories are relevant, where the bodies are buried, and where the shovels are at.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Suspenseful and well-written account of Alan Mulally's battle to save Ford, January 25, 2012
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Books about businesses- and the individuals who head them - can often come across as thinly veiled promos for the companies and CEOs. As a result, they often have me yawning before I've gotten through the first chapter.

But American Icon is a major exception. Yes, the focus is on Alan Mulally (Ford CEO) and how he achieved a stunning turnaround for Ford. But Bryce G. Hoffman also provides plenty of information about Bill Ford Jr. (Executive Chairman at Ford) , other major players, and the dynamics of the Ford family...power struggles, tensions, triumphs, and all..

Relevant quotes from Henry Ford introduce each chapter, a very nice touch, connecting the automobile company's past and present. An example: "We do not make changes for the sake of making them, but we never fail to make a change when once it is demonstrated that the new way is better than the old way." This quote heads the chapter entitled 'The Revolution Begins.'

It is important for potential readers to know that this book isn't a simple puff piece for Mullaly, doing nothing but singing his praises. Instead, it is a hard-hitting and very honest portrayal of some very tough years at Ford, significant enough to potentially bankrupt the company. When Mulally came on the scene, the company - and company executives- didn't work well. Executives fought with each other. Unity was rare. Toyota was leaving Ford in the dust. The economy was hitting one of the worst periods in history.

Its no wonder that Mulally had to be wooed- and heavily - to agree to leave his job at Boeing and come to Ford. While intrigued, he was also reluctant and actually turned down the initial job offer. After all, he'd already fended off major threats to Boeing and gotten due credit for leading the company to record sales, revenue, and earnings. Why would he want to enter the trenches again?

Even after agreeing to work for Ford, Mulally faced what seemed like an insurmountable task. At the end of 2008, Ford Motor Company was about to go bankrupt - and that is no exaggeration. In addition to that bleak reality, Mullaly also had to deal with the UAW, an economy that was tanking and challenges he couldn't even begin to foresee. As tough as he thought the job would be, it became far more difficult than he could envision.

Among other challenges, Mulally quickly discovered that executives often exaggerated their sales estimates or other data, making it hard to figure out the truth behind the numbers given. So Mulally put in place what was to become a bedrock of his corporate meetings: the BPR or business plan review. He went even further by making SENIOR execs (yes, worth stressing) - and not their assistants - do the presentations for their departments. This was akin to a revolutionary move. It met with resistance but credit Bill Ford Jr. with supporting Mulally.

During a particularly harsh period in our economy, one which isn't over yet ( as of today's date), what Mulally accomplished is nothing short of miraculous. And reading about what transpired had my heart racing. Moment to moment suspense and drama fill the pages of this behind the scenes look at the battle to save Ford. In order to create such a compelling work, the author conducted well over a hundred interviews with Ford executives, other business leaders, Ford family members, and of course Alan Mulally. Perhaps that is why I felt like I was sitting in many of the meetings, listening to every discussion, and being privy to the game plan for saving Ford...a game plan that was tweaked, however often, to adapt to critical economic and other factors at Ford as well as the U.S. and world economy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Boring Business Book? Not This One!, March 16, 2012
By 
Terry Sunday (El Paso, Texas United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
My last American car was a 1971 Chevrolet Camaro, for which I traded in a 1965 Ford Mustang convertible (I wish I had it now!). Other than those two, all the vehicles I've owned have been British, German or Japanese. As an avid gearhead, I've subscribed to "Car & Driver" and "Road & Track" for most of my adult life, and followed the ups and downs of the automobile industry through articles in their pages. I've rented more than my share of cars over the years, many of them Fords, so I've had some opportunities to check out the brand. As an aerospace engineer, I knew about the superb reputation Alan Mulally gained in leading the development of Boeing's latest commercial airliners. Thus I was very interested in reading this book that targeted several of my interests: Bryce G. Hoffman's "American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company."

Mr. Hoffman's detailed story of Ford's decline and resurrection over the last decade or so is not what you might expect from a "business book." Rather, his masterful, well-crafted tale of the turnaround of a huge, iconic American corporation reads with the page-turning immediacy of a best-selling novel. In his clear, lucid and highly accessible text, he explains exactly why and how Ford got itself into near-bankruptcy, and how Alan Mulally, the "white knight" that Ford CEO Bill Ford, Jr., lured away from his highly successful career at Boeing, rode in and led the team of able executives that rescued the faltering automaker.

Mr. Hoffman describes Mulally's bold, often unprecedented, actions with great clarity, liberally quoting from meeting transcripts and conversations such that the reader feels she or he was present at the discussions. He presents esoteric financial concepts and complex contractual issues accurately and completely, but in terms casual readers can easily understand. "American Icon" is mostly the story of the team of people that saved Ford, but it doesn't scrimp in touching on the technical details of automobile design, engineering, assembly, global sales, etc., so that even techno-weenies can enjoy it.

Ford's turnaround is a remarkable accomplishment in the annals of business history, and Mr. Hoffman's illuminating dissection of the whole story illustrates how the right kinds of people with the right kinds of skills and management philosophies can succeed against seemingly impossible odds. "American Icon" deserves to be read by a wide audience of executives, managers, business owners and employees at all levels and in all industries as an outstanding example of the power of inspirational, participative leadership. I highly recommend this "business book that reads like a novel" to any and all readers. It's a great story, superbly told.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impossible to 'Oversell' This Book!, March 13, 2012
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
It's also impossible to not gain respect and admiration for the principals involved - Bill Ford and Alan Mulally; thank goodness America has people with these qualities able to meet today's challenges.

Scene I in Mr. Hoffman's book takes place at the end of 2008. Congress has offered each of the 'Big Three' a bailout. Ford, unlike G.M. and Chrysler, decided to save itself. (To be fair, the Ford family had no choice and undoubtedly recognized that bankruptcy or federal restructuring would preclude its continued dominance of the firm.) Previously it had gone outside the auto industry and recruited Alan Mulally from Boeing after he had pulled Boeing from the economic ashes of 9/11. Until Bill Ford's taking the reins in 2001 Ford, like G.M. and Chrysler, had remained fat and complacent, despite losing market share to new competitors in the U.S. and Asia. All three had too many factories, dealers, models, and workers, enormous legacy costs, and overly generous union contracts. Most of the smart money was on Ford being the first of the Big Three to fail.

Bill Ford led a 2001 boardroom coup that replaced then CEO Jacques Nasser out of concern over his diversification away from automobiles, anti-environmentalism stance, spinning off its Visteon parts network, alienating dealers, implementing separate supplier negotiations for each major Ford component, and the Firestone-Ford quality/safety debacle. Bill Ford led improvement efforts in every front - closing five factories (21,000 jobs), ending conspicuous consumption, and reducing dividends to lower costs, improving quality, placating dealers, and improving mileage. However, rising gas prices, its over-reliance on SUVs and large pickups, blatant top-level infighting, and union contracts led to a $6 billion loss in the third-quarter of 2006 instead of the $7 billion in profits that he had promised for the year when he first took over.

Bill Ford then recognized he needed help, and after several searches, selected Alan Mulally at Boeing.

Hoffman then provides readers with an interesting side-trip illustrating that Ford had had a long history of management problems. For example, Henry Ford had figured out how much money to set aside for accounts-payable each month by weighing its bills, preferred anecdotal reports on his company (sometimes via espionage) over more rational accounting, and had driven some of his most talented associates into the arms of competitors - eg. William Knudson, James Couzons). Henry Ford II later helped install good accounting during WWII, but went on to foment factional infighting to ensure his own dominance, aided by wiretaps and continual executive shuffling. Lee Iacocca, as a result, left Ford after his stunning Mustang success and moved to save Chrysler.

Other early Ford near-disasters included its nearly being bankrupted in 1920 (Henry Ford had borrowed heavily to buy out his early investors and to construct the mammoth River Rouge plant - he 'saved' the company by then forcing dealers to take delivery and pay for its 125,000 Detroit factory inventory), the 1970s fiery Pinto crashes, and Henry Ford II's successors miring the firm in internal combat vs. the Ford family (still owns controlling interest thanks to its supervoting Class B shares) which wanted Bill Ford on the board.

Mulally's rise to the top job at Boeing had been blocked by previous CEO scandals there, followed by the DOD demanding it bring someone in from the outside. Hence, Jim McNerney, former head of G.E. aircraft engine division and then CEO of 3M took the position. Mulally's first action was to reduce the number of top-level meetings, require they focus on data, mandate no side discussions or Blackberries, demand that the executives speak for themselves and not have staffers do it for them, and require its top leaders drive competitors' cars as well as Fords.

Mulally's other early actions included reading prior studies of Ford's problems, commissioning new ones, talking to industry experts, visiting the Consumer Reports test center for direct feedback, and visiting its own Mazda division (found Ford had 'silo-ed' design from engineering). Decided to consolidate Ford North America, South America, Europe (3), Australia, China, and India - using a matrix approach to still capture local expertise while building on common platforms. Also found Ford had 8 brands - Mazda, Vovo, Jaguar, Ashton-Martin, Land Rover, Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury.

Mulally slowly changed the culture as well. Managers were reassured with "You 'have' a problem, 'you' are not the problem.' Honest admitting of problems was stressed and applauded. Those at the root of the infighting were moved out. And Bill Ford refused to allow managers to go around Mulally through him. Recognizing the need for major change, Ford borrowed $23.6 billion, pledging as security even the Ford oval nameplate.

Too many options was another problem - eg. the 2007 Ford Mustang V-6 deluxe offered 16,000 options, including colors. UAW support was slowly won, starting with opening the books to their experts. G.M. and Chrysler's similar problems and negotiations also helped. Mulally supported the bailout for G.M. and Chrysler out of fear that if they went down, major Ford suppliers would go down with them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What the heck...?, February 7, 2012
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
What the heck is going on here? A book about business that doesn't bore one silly? Well, indeed, this is a new kind of beast.

I obtained this book because the auto industry interests me and I thought I could learn something, but I figured my learning would come at the expense of falling asleep occasionally while reading the book. But I was wrong, which is no surprise because I have been wrong before and probably will be again.

Anyway, this really is a well-written and entertaining book. It is almost like a action/adventure book of business. It is quick moving, supplies a great deal of interesting information (such as GM coming to Ford and asking to merge), and lets the reader in on the inside workings of management at Ford.

Plenty of others here have already gone over the content of the book, so I will not repeat it. I'll just say that if business interests you, or if the auto industry interests you, then this is a book you will be happy to read.

I really enjoyed reading this book, both because of the content and because of the extremely well-written nature of the book.

P.S. to car industry guys: Give me a freaking bench seat in a car! I don't want my space wasted with a useless center console. That is why I buy trucks. I am comfortable in a bench seat. I can get a bench seat in a truck. I don't have a center console squeezing my leg space. Quit trying to stick me in those stupid bucket seats. I am not driving a race car. I am not corning so fast I will fall out of the seat. I am driving to work. And besides, it would be nice to be able to put six people in a large car when it is needed on occasional. It is sad that a car as big as the new Taurus can only seat five. Get rid of that stupid center console so I can put someone's butt there when I need too. I don't need another place for another cup holder; I need another seat. Okay, rant done. Carry on.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Interesting - But a Little Heavy on Praise, February 19, 2012
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
"American Icon" details the rise of The Ford Motor Company from the brink of bankruptcy to profitability - without the need of need a government bailout. The author, Bryce Hoffman was given unprecedented access to Alan Mulally, Bill Ford and a majority for the executive staff of Ford. American Icon lets us see it all the good, the bad, the infighting, and every battle scar that occurred along the way.

Points of interest

- A detailed analysis of the dysfunctional culture that was fostered under Nasser.

- The *wooing*of Alan Mulally by Bill Ford and the board of The Ford Motor Company

- The transformation of Ford's management style to the Mulally way. As you can imagine the management team within Ford had some growing pains. However, once the executive management learned to trust the process the transformation of the company began in earnest.

- The details behind the landmark loan Ford was able to secure, by using the entire company as collateral - including the big Blue Oval.

- For me, the highlight of the book is the strategy amongst the Ford team on how to weather the Great Recession. Part of the strategy was the decision not to take a government bailout.

Only one real complaint about "American Icon" it certainly tries to make Alan Mulally out as an "icon". The praise is nearly continuous and all decisions are viewed as being inspired. There can be no doubt that Mulally helped lead and inspire a turn-around within Ford, but he was hardly alone. it is mentioned that much of Ford's cost cutting was done prior to Mulally joining the Ford team, but I don't think the author gives enough credit to the entire Ford team - from executive management to the factory worker.

Final Verdict - A very impressive book on the transformation of Ford. I really enjoyed the detailed insider's view on the return rise to prominence of the Ford Motor Company.

4 to 4 1/2 Stars
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who says business is boring?, February 20, 2012
By 
Scott FS (Sacramento, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
It will take historians another 25 years (at least) to sort out the Great Recession of 2008. However, along the way, there will be books such as this one which will give us insight to some of the drama, and some of the blood, sweat and tears that comes with being the only automaker of the big three US automakers to escape going bankrupt and asking the government to screw your bond holders and beg for millions to save your company. GM (some wags call it 'Government Motors') and Chrysler couldn't (or wouldn't) go the same, tough way as Alan Mulally chose, with the sometimes reluctant workers at Ford, who were asked to give wage concessions and the like to help save the company.

This is a good book, and if you want to understand how business works (not that different from yours, maybe) I'd recommend this tome. It's a good and fairly easy read. Bring it on your next business trip or spring break.

Strongly recommended. It's just such a fascinating subject and well-written, I found it was hard to put down.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MUST READ for business people and car enthusiasts alike!, March 5, 2012
This review is from: American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Disclaimer: I'm a long time Ford employee and my wife was one of those who took a voluntary package in the 2007 exodus. That makes it a bit harder to be neutral, since I'm already rooting for the home team, but also has made it far more interesting since I am already familiar with many of the key players and issues outlined in the book.

As a bit of a coincidence, one of the books I read recently was Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance. In this book, it's clear that culture and organizational behavior are as important as knowing what to do in a given situation. In a repeated theme, Gawande describes how the life saving practice of washing hands between patients was lost in the early 1800's because it's staunchest advocate was a jerk. Even today, hospitals struggle to enforce mandatory hand washing due to cultural and other systemic issues.

What does this have to do with Ford? Many People at Ford have known for decades what they needed to do for long term survival, yet cultural issues prevented them from effecting these changes. The author spends the first few chapters outlining the history of Ford and how prior attempts to restructure had failed.

That's where Mulally comes in. There are many elements which made him effective, but none more critical than his ability to affect behavioral change in a large organization. Being an effective leader is far more than knowing what people should do - it also requires flawless and unwavering execution - something that can only be accomplished with everybody pulling in the same direction. I found numerous passages describing his leadership techniques to be truly inspiring, and I plan to model them going forward.

When Alan was brought in, like many of the whispers, I expected a "house cleaning" at the top. Instead, his revolution was quiet and preserved the vast store of knowledge and experience. Behind the scenes, it was a somewhat different story, as this book reveals. As someone who works at Ford, I was amazed to see details of palace intrigue splattered there in black and white.

Although I already knew how it ended, the intrigue, infighting, larger than life personalities and real life drama create a suspenseful page turner that I was not able to put down. It's a leadership testimonial, history lesson, and human interest book all rolled together in a tight and thoroughly enjoyable book.

The author masterfully adds key context and allegories that effectively illustrate the complexities of the situation facing Ford and the American auto industry. Carefully selected quotes from Henry Ford perfectly frame each chapter.

I think Amazon will be sending quite a few copies to Dearborn!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 236 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company
American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company by Bryce G. Hoffman (Hardcover - March 13, 2012)
Used & New from: $15.30
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.