American Idiot (Regular Edition) [Explicit]
 
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American Idiot (Regular Edition) [Explicit]

September 8, 2004

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
American Idiot [Explicit]
2:54
2
Jesus Of Suburbia [Explicit]
9:08
3
Holiday/Boulevard Of Broken Dreams [Explicit]
8:13
4
Are We The Waiting/St. Jimmy [Explicit]
5:38
5
Give Me Novacaine/She's A Rebel
5:26
6
Extraordinary Girl/Letterbomb [Explicit]
7:40
7
Wake Me Up When September Ends
4:45
8
Homecoming [Explicit]
9:18
9
Whatsername
4:12


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 3, 1998
  • Release Date: March 3, 1998
  • Label: Reprise
  • Copyright: 2004 Reprise Records for the U.S. and WEA International Inc. for the world outside the U.S.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 57:14
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B0011Z10PC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2,240 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,266 Paid in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 Paid in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1,383
4 star
272
3 star
117
2 star
105
1 star
363
See all 2,240 customer reviews
Green Day's "American Idiot" is one of the best CD's I've ever heard, if not the best.
weirdo
Billie Joe Armstrong is also a super annoying vocalist, don't even compare him to punk legends like Joey Ramone(RIP) or Glenn Danzig!
The Metal Master_92
There is a very good story that is told through this album and only a few songs are politically based.
Ted S

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

189 of 191 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 2, 2004
Format: Audio CD
For those of you who are unaware that this is a rock opera, let me fill you in.

My take on the album:

American Idiot: An introduction to the setting and mood of the story; describes the current way of life in America and the issues some have with it.

Jesus of Suburbia:

I. Jesus of Suburbia: We are introduced to the main character, "Jesus of Suburbia," so named because he's a typical suburban kid (there's nothing wrong with me, this is how i'm supposed to be): his parents are divorced, he sits around watching TV, and experiments with drugs. He feels an emptiness in his life.

II. City of the Damned: Jesus' discontentment grows as he realizes the apathy of those surrounding him.

III. I Don't Care: Jesus sees how widespread people's indifference is.

IV. Dearly Beloved: Jesus notes the effect of this indifference on his own personal relationships.

V. Tales of Another Broken Home: Fed up to the point of breaking, Jesus leaves home in search of meaning and a purpose in his life.

Holiday: Jesus meditates on the problems with modern American government and society as he wanders the streets of the city to which he has run away.

Boulevard of Broken Dreams: Jesus laments his lonliness in this new place. This song hints at the upcoming emergence of St. Jimmy (I'm walking down the line that divides me somewhere in my mind).

Are We the Waiting: Still alone, Jesus wonders what will become of him. He comes to reject his identity (the Jesus of Suburbia is a lie) and decides to create a new one, leading to...

St. Jimmy: The introduction of "St. Jimmy," the punk street kid personality that Jesus invents to go along with his new life.
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101 of 110 people found the following review helpful By NYC-HeartsFC-Fan on October 4, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Although I annually listen to hundreds of albums in my capacity as music director at my University's radio station, I can safely say that this album is the most bracing, rich and rewarding album of the year. Certainly, it is not a superficially original album-the influences that range from the Who's mini-rock opera "A Quick One...", general power pop, punk and pure pop are immediately recognisable. However, Armstrong and company have created an immediately endearing and--surprisingly enough-transcendent work that functions and succeeds on so many levels.

I suspect that those who have matured with this band, and have witnessed the seeming intra-personal, political and intellectual collapse of this nation in the decade since "Dookie"-will find this album to be particularly affecting. (Particularly those of us, such as the reviewer, who have reached a point of their life at which past dreams and illusions are beginning to be elided by the pressing concerns of an exhausting and enervating, if lucrative, professional existence that will come into existence after graduation.)

I must note, however, that this album has been unfortunately vilified by a variety of groups.

Elitist indie-hipsters, who find impossible the prospect of enjoying an album that is not only released on a major label but also is commercially success, castigate the band as trite, mainstream and unoriginal.

Frozen-in-time `punks' castigate the album for not being 'punk' enough (as if a standard, universal definition of punk exists!)

Those with extraordinarily limited capabilities for analytical thought castigate the band for being anti-american or some other nonsense.
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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD
For those of you that are currently unaware, "American Idiot" is a rock opera and a concept album, much like The Who's "Tommy" or Pink Floyd's "The Wall."

My take on the album:

American Idiot: An introduction to the setting and mood of the story; describes the current way of life in America and the issues some have with it.

Jesus of Suburbia:

I. Jesus of Suburbia: We are introduced to the main character, "Jesus of Suburbia," so named because he's a typical suburban kid (there's nothing wrong with me, this is how i'm supposed to be): his parents are divorced, he sits around watching TV, and experiments with drugs. He feels an emptiness in his life.

II. City of the Damned: Jesus' discontentment grows as he realizes the apathy of those surrounding him.

III. I Don't Care: Jesus sees how widespread people's indifference is.

IV. Dearly Beloved: Jesus notes the effect of this indifference on his own personal relationships.

V. Tales of Another Broken Home: Fed up to the point of breaking, Jesus leaves home in search of meaning and a purpose in his life.

Holiday: Jesus meditates on the problems with modern American government and society as he wanders the streets of the city to which he has run away.

Boulevard of Broken Dreams: Jesus laments his lonliness in this new place. This song hints at the upcoming emergence of St. Jimmy (I'm walking down the line that divides me somewhere in my mind).

Are We the Waiting: Still alone, Jesus wonders what will become of him. He comes to reject his identity (the Jesus of Suburbia is a lie) and decides to create a new one, leading to...

St. Jimmy: The introduction of "St.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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