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American Indian Literature, Environmental Justice, and Ecocriticism: The Middle Place Paperback – January 1, 2001


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American Indian Literature, Environmental Justice, and Ecocriticism: The Middle Place + Listening to the Land: Native American Literary Responses to the Landscape
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 214 pages
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816517924
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816517923
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,150,478 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Adamson challenges complacency throughout her book. . . . a truly innovative study that should be in all academic collections." —Choice"Her persuasive and passionate arguments call her readers to awareness and responsibility." —ISLE"Powerful and immensely readable." —Folklore

From the Inside Flap

Although much contemporary American Indian literature examines the relationship between humans and the land, most Native authors do not set their work in the "pristine wilderness" celebrated by mainstream nature writers. Instead, they focus on settings such as reservations, open-pit mines, and contested borderlands. Drawing on her own teaching experience among Native Americans and on lessons learned from such recent scenes of confrontation as Chiapas and Black Mesa, Joni Adamson explores why what counts as "nature" is often very different for multicultural writers and activist groups than it is for mainstream environmentalists. This powerful book is one of the first to examine the intersections between literature and the environment from the perspective of the oppressions of race, class, gender, and nature, and the first to review American Indian literature from the standpoint of environmental justice and ecocriticism. By examining such texts as Sherman Alexie's short stories and Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Almanac of the Dead, Adamson contends that these works, in addition to being literary, are examples of ecological criticism that expand Euro-American concepts of nature and place. Adamson shows that when we begin exploring the differences that shape diverse cultural and literary representations of nature, we discover the challenge they present to mainstream American culture, environmentalism, and literature. By comparing the work of Native authors such as Simon Ortiz with that of environmental writers such as Edward Abbey, she reveals opportunities for more multicultural conceptions of nature and the environment. More than a work of literary criticism, this is a book about the search to find ways to understand our cultural and historical differences and similarities in order to arrive at a better agreement of what the human role in nature is and should be. It exposes the blind spots in early ecocriticism and shows the possibilities for building common ground— a middle place— where writers, scholars, teachers, and environmentalists might come together to work for social and environmental change. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ron Mader on July 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
(Planeta.com Journal) -- The author's experiences among the Tohono O'odham nation that crosses the Mexico-United States border serves as a critical backdrop to her in-depth examinations of literature, such as Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead and Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire. This is a powerful book that focuses attention on the linkages between literature and the envrionment. It's the first to review American Indian literature from the standpoint of environmental justice. By exposing the blind spots in our cultural vision, it does create opportunities for building common ground, or as the author terms, "the middle place" where environmentalists, scholars, writers and teachers can come together to work for social and environmental change.
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