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American Spies: Espionage against the United States from the Cold War to the Present Hardcover – October 28, 2013


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American Spies: Espionage against the United States from the Cold War to the Present + Spying in America: Espionage from the Revolutionary War to the Dawn of the Cold War + Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press (October 28, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1626160082
  • ISBN-13: 978-1626160088
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #199,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"As a bibliophile who devours several lineal feet of books on espionage and intelligence each month, both for review and for pleasure, I find it delightful to encounter a volume written by a professional who has walked the ground about which he writes [….] Albeit scholarly, it brims with details of spying that make for enjoyable reading." -- The Intelligencer: Journal of US Intelligence Studies



"The book is very readable; it is a history of espionage played out on American shores. The stories are long enough to be detailed but short enough to hold attention. While reading I kept hoping someone would find out about them and stop the leakage of secrets but usually they were able to spy for years undetected. I very much recommend this book as a caution to our current times." -- San Francisco Book Review



"In addition to being an interesting, well-researched, and well-written book, 'American Spies' is a thought-provoking […] analysis of the security and counterintelligence problems the United States faces today and in the future. It should be read by anyone who has a professional or personal interest in these areas." -- Proceedings



"Sulick blends the historical record with his own intelligence expertise to create a nonfiction espionage thriller on par with the best of Ian Fleming and John Le Carre." -- Choice



"Makes real-life spy history come alive, and is highly recommended especially for public and college library American History shelves." -- Midwest Book Review



"I find it delightful to encounter a volume written by a professional who has walked the ground about which he writes. A must-read." -- Washington Times



"As director of CIA, I found my regular counterintelligence briefings to be depressing affairs: how could seemingly loyal, normal Americans stoop to (at best) ill-advised and (too frequently) disloyal and illegal behavior. If only I had had the chance to read Mike Sulick's American Spies, I might have known and better understood. Sulick's readable style and obvious espionage expertise translate into an expert's view of what has motivated betrayal by Americans in the modern era. His narrative reads like a fictional page-turner but with a practitioner's understanding of a real world where betrayal has become far too common. This is a must-read if one hopes to understand what it will take to keep America's secrets secret." -- Michael Hayden, General USAF (Retired), former director of CIA, former director of NSA



"This and Sulick's first volume describe some of the most damaging spies in our history with gripping accounts of their motives, espionage, and the temper of the times. The detailed, often compelling accounts fascinate. But more importantly, they sound a loud warning buzzer to once again challenge our near chronic disbelief -- even today -- about the extent of spying directed against America and the perennial readiness of some to betray it." -- Peter Earnest, executive director, International Spy Museum



"In this, his second volume of Spying in America, retired intelligence officer and historian Michael Sulick presents vividly to readers how America, as a primary intelligence target of foreign countries and groups, protects against these attacks within the competing democratic challenges of national security and civil liberties. Sulick's extensive research gives a professional's up-to-date analysis of Russian, Chinese, and Cuban successes, and introduces us to the newer threats from terrorist organizations and cyber espionage." -- Burton Gerber, retired CIA senior operations officer



"Drawing on a long career in the CIA's clandestine service, Michael Sulick's survey of espionage in America during and after the Cold War presents balanced analytical comparative case summaries that emphasize the most significant operations that challenged American intelligence agencies. Fascinating stories, well written, and a much needed contribution to the literature. For a basic understanding of America's contemporary espionage history -- read this book!" -- Hayden Peake, intelligence bibliographer, Curator of CIA Historical Intelligence Collection

Review

"These annals read like fiction, which plays into Sulick's statement that, due to our unique geographical location and emphasis on individual liberties, Americans possess a disbelief that the threat of espionage exists within our borders… yet as Sulick proves with this broad work, foreign attempts at espionage have existed since the country's inception and will surely continue." -- Publishers Weekly, reviewing a previous edition or volume



"Reading Michael Sulick on the subject [of espionage] is akin to taking a tour of London with the queen of England as your personal guide. The author comes with blue-ribbon credentials: he served in the CIA as an operations officer for 28 years, in positions including chief of counterintelligence and director of the National Clandestine Service." -- Joseph C. Goulden, Washington Times, review of Spying in America



"What is most interesting are the motivations of citizens to betray their own country in contrast to those sent here to spy on us.... The author certainly knows the subject inside and out. This is an easy-to-read introduction for interested laypersons or those taking beginning courses on the history of intelligence operations." -- Library Journal, reviewing a previous edition or volume



"Mr. Sulick's timely and valuable book, Spying in America: Espionage from the Revolutionary War to the Dawn of the Cold War, should have been required reading before those ladies and gentlemen [of the US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee] ever sought national office, because in its succinct, well-written chapters, the author lays out a history few Americans know and some barely even suspect… Mr. Sulick's equally painstaking abilities as a historian have allowed him produce a book that is unfailingly succinct but richly illustrated and well documented. He also brings his practical experience as an intelligence operator to a thought provoking concluding chapter." -- Kenneth Allard, New York Journal of Books, review of Spying in America


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By F. Carol Sabin on December 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This second volume of Mr. Sulick covers the story of American spies cases from the outset of the Cold War to the present day. The author writes with authority and conviction in an engaging manner that makes this second volume an authentic historical review of espionage in US, a very enjoyable read and more importantly, informative and educative study for young generation when considering the increased espionage activity and current informational environment.

Having read few earlier books on these cases, I had high expectations for this book, especially from an insider’s view. In this informative and gripping account he details the most damaging cases of espionage ever committed against USA, selected by the importance of the particular case, the agency involved or its relevance to other issues associated with espionage in US history. Altogether, their actions constituted one of the most serious security breaches in US history inflicted by Soviet/East Germany/Cuba and Israel intelligence services.

The book is organized into six parts, each with 3 to 7 chapters (27 such chapters in total), preceded by a very short preface, a comprehensive introduction and the explanation on "abbreviations". The spy cases presented follow almost the same pattern of analysis: a short spy biography and career, his/her motivations, the secrets they betrayed, their tradecraft and punishment, unrecognized indicators of their espionage and a short conclusion of the damage inflicted on US national security.

The old cases from the beginning of the Cold War show also their exposure. The exposures, however, abruptly ceased from the mid-80s to the end of the Cold War despite they were fully covered in some books or articles (Conrad spy ring by GRU colonel V.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Paul Gelman on November 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Intelligence has played a significant part in the history of the Cold War. Spies, as the author mentions, did not change the political balance between the superpowers, but they were responsible, to a great extent, for letting the other side know of the opponent's intentions.
This volume, being supplementary to the first volume which is a history of espionage in America between the nation's birth to the Cold War, is superb and contains a lot of well known cases in which American citizens betrayed their country. The author displays not only a very good command of each case, but also analyzes in depth many cases of espionage which happened during the last sixty years. The main reason for spying was money. As Mr. Sulick writes,"American disbelief in espionage reached its heights in the decades preceding World War Two". The Soviets invested a lot of efforts to extract vital information about each facet of America, thus they were willing to pay huge amounts of money to anyone who would deliver the merchandise. The years between 1945-1970 were justly called "the Golden Age" of espionage, since the Soviets' network included spies from all walks of life, from inside and outside the government, from the highest levels to low-ranking clerks.
Elizabeth Bentley, The Rosenbergs, Harry Dexter White, Theodore Hall, the Venona Project, Aldrich Ames, Ronald Pelton, John Walker and Robert Hanssen, as well as other less famous spies people the pages of this book.
Mr. Sulick discusses in great detail the motivations of those spies, the access and the secrets they betrayed, their exposure and the punishment given to each of them and the damage they caused to the national security of the USA.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William McManus on March 20, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I coupled this book with John Rizzo's latest book and they complimented each other very nicely.

Mr. Sulick's book was a complilation of historical periods of spying done by american citizens and
non-citizens for interests common to most. Ideaology, greed and the good life permeated all of
these characters. I was in the intel business in the USAF so I was aware of some of these accounts.

Great read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bill Danvers on March 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover
If you want to get a true understanding of this issue then buy this book. MIchael Sulick is not only a substantive expert, he is a scholar. This is a must read for those who want to know more about the real world of spys and spying.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard S. Smith on March 29, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well written, comprehensive and full of information missing from the television news at the time of these events, thoroughly enjoyed reading this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By kenneth a. daigler on January 30, 2014
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Mr. Sulick's second volume would seem to complete a textbook review of major American espionage cases from the birth of the country into the era of the War on Terrorism". He focuses on the motivations of the individuals involved, why they were eventually exposed and the amount of damage done by their spying efforts. He makes the valid point that in addition to the threats such activities pose to U.S. national security, the costs to the nation to repair the damages done means that other national funding requirements must be reduced.

This book, and his first volume, is both a "must read" and a research text for anyone interested in understanding how and why espionage has affected U.S. national security and U.S. goverance.
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