American V: A Hundred Highways

July 4, 2006 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 4, 2006
  • Release Date: July 4, 2006
  • Label: American Recordings
  • Copyright: (C) 2006 American Recordings, LLC & The Island Def Jam Music Group
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:42
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000W11NOY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (205 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,422 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Depth, emotion and that voice.
David V. Hale
If you want to hear a tired old man singing, then, by all means, buy this album and you may only listen to it once.
Timothy W. Beeker
It'll make you smile, it will make you cry, it'll change your life.
Mitchell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

176 of 180 people found the following review helpful By K. H. Orton VINE VOICE on July 5, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I'm appreciative of the one reviewer so far who didn't give this an obligatory 5 stars, and suspicious of those that did. So why the full 5? Because, this is one of the most quietly, powerful albums I've heard all year & because it's so personal sounding.

To these ears, each American album had something to set it apart from the others & if I were to characterize this (hopefully) latest installment, I'd say A Hundred Highways is the most lonesome sounding of the lot. The sound of a man alone. Stripped of youth, health & any illusions.

All of the records in this series could be considered sparse in terms of production & accompaniment. Producer Rick Rubin acts more like a still photographer trying to capture the moment, rather than pull any strings. Which is one reason why they've all been good. He just let Cash be Cash. And in terms of all their previous work together I have to say, Highways is the most low key. It's also one of the most initimate. No Fiona Apples moaning in the background. No flashy covers like "Rusty Cage" or "Hurt". No frills at all. Just that voice & maybe a little acoustic guitar & organ. As he's so often proved, Rubin has good taste & this album is a far cry from some sort of open casket funeral.

"Help Me" starts things off & the fragility in Cash's voice cannot be denied. For some this isn't easy to take. The song is a plea & the end result is more heartbroken than desperate. "God's Gonna Cut You down" is easily the most rousing number on the album & Cash's voice comes across like thunder that is soon to die down in the distance.

As many have pointed out "309" is the last song he wrote. As any fan knows, The Man In Black was fond of train songs & it serves as a fitting epitaph, completely void of any self pity.
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68 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Timothy W. Beeker on July 6, 2006
Format: Audio CD
It's a bit hard to talk about this album. If you want to hear a tired old man singing, then, by all means, buy this album and you may only listen to it once.

If you want to hear from a man who was in love and had a truly broken heart, then listen to Johnny sing to June. I'd dare say that you'd not get past "On The Evening Train" without being moved.

The heart of the man was broken in more than one way. Listen to him sing to and about the Lord. While you're listening, remember Johnny's life and all that went with it. Then, project the thoughts of some of these songs onto yourself and be glad that you have the foresight of his life. Some of the lines in these songs speak in a powerful way that they would not speak, if anyone other than Mr. Cash sang them. I looked at myself, when the clapping and stomping finally ended in "God's Gonna Cut You Down." I could see myself, to some degree, in many of the characters that he sang about in that song. It was not a pretty sight. But, I take this as help from both the man and the Spirit that led him.

I've been trying for a very long time now to try to seperate body, soul and spirit into definable parts. This album helped me to do this in a way that I've never been able to do before. Mr. Cash was old and tired. His body was feeble. If you've read anything at all about the album and how it came to be, and then listen to it, you'll have no doubt that he was tired. I believe that his soul had been ravaged (by his own actions) and then redeemed again (through June's love) and finally broken by June's death. You cannot escape these thoughts on this album.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By prisrob TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 3, 2006
Format: Audio CD
"Listening to "A Hundred Highways" and to earlier versions in the "American Series", it seems like these discs encapsulate the effects of time not just on Cash but on all of us. If age and sickness could wear down a voice of such power, a voice that sounded, in its prime, like it was a thousand years old, what does it hold in store for the rest of us? And you can't help but think that Cash's decline mirrors the decline so many of us have seen around us in our own families, strong men and women cut low with astonishing speed." Andrew Gilstrap

All of us understand that Johnny Cash was singing to keep himself alive. It has been told that the only time he felt alive after his wife, June Carter Cash's death, was when he was recording. The songs were Johnny Cash's reflection of his mortality, and that of all of us. Songs from many of the well known song writers appear on this CD, as well as his last written song "309". They seem so fitting and a message is within all of them. This CD is a memorial from Cash to all of us, and we are recipients of a CD that is frail and strong at the same time.

"Help Me"- by Larry Gatalin sets the tone for the weary man who is facing his journeys end. "I'm tired of walking all alone, Never thought I needed help before. Now, I know I just can't help it anymore."

"God's Gonna Cut You Down"- a strong rendition" You can run on for a long time, but sooner or later he's gonna cut you down".

"Like the 309"- afterlife, prayer, death, his last song "It should be a while before I see Dr Death. I am not a whiner or cryin kind until I hear the whistle of the 309- puttin me and my box on the 309".

"If you Could Read My Mind"- Gordon Lightfoot's song sung in a weary, resigned tone. "You know that Ghost Is Me", yes we do.
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