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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Book Ever Written On America's Founding Principles
The most concise, well thought out book ever written on the founding principles of American Society. Mr. Vazsonyi provides THE thorough overview of the foundations that make America, the product of over 3000 years of Monotheism and Western Civilization, unique among all nations. A must read for all immigrants who want to know how to be American, for those who feel...
Published on August 23, 1998

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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Egality versus Rule of Law
America is in the midst of a war over ideas. Of course, ideas are never completely settled. But we have, in recent decades, seen the spread of ideas that will have dire consequences for all Americans if they continue to gain popularity. Vasonyi points to parallels between liberal democrats or social democrats and the Bolsheviks and Nazis who oppressed him in his youth...
Published on April 20, 2008 by D. W. MacKenzie


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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Book Ever Written On America's Founding Principles, August 23, 1998
By A Customer
The most concise, well thought out book ever written on the founding principles of American Society. Mr. Vazsonyi provides THE thorough overview of the foundations that make America, the product of over 3000 years of Monotheism and Western Civilization, unique among all nations. A must read for all immigrants who want to know how to be American, for those who feel something is not quite right with America but can't put it in concrete terms, and all students in courses titled "Government," "Civics," and "American History.".
With the personal perspective and clarity only an immigrant is likely to have, Mr. Vazsonyi effectively demonstrates the two dominant concepts of government - Anglo American principles clearly delineated in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and the French German Welfare State founded in the blood of the French Revolution and refined in Bismark's Germany. Mr. Vazsonyi shows how Communism, socialism, liberalism, and all the other "ism's" that have developed in the last two hundred years are manifestations of a very old concept of governance which tries to create the perfect society envisioned by a self-appointed elite using a centralized government administering a command economy. American Society, by contrast, created a set of principles designed to enable each individual to develop himself according to the advantages his circumstances allowed. Adoption of these principles produced a society of responsible and moral individuals, who built a great nation from the grass roots, without the help of any central authority.
America's 30 Year's War asks: In light of the prosperity and freedom the system created by our founders provided us, do we really want to adopt the statist European model that, in its various forms, has lead to the elimination of entire populations and the destruction of private property, capital, and individual freedom? By its existence, America has prevented the ultimate triumph of the European Welfare State and its approach to governance. Impossible to defeat externally, American Founding Principles are being attacked internally; primarily by those in government, entertainment, academia, and media who want her to be just as equal as all other nations. The approach is to use feel good words and concepts such as multiculturualism, regulation, social justice (what exactly does that term mean, who defines it and when will we know when we've achieved it?) assaults on property rights, group identity and class warfare, to make people feel warm, fuzzy, and receptive about various causes and movements that pound away at America's Constitutional Foundations. These same methods, used in the author's native Hungry by both German and Russian occupiers in the 40's and 50's, are used to produce passionate, caring "Useful Idiots." Mr. Vazsonyi suggests a return to Constitutional Principles will ensure the rebirth of the Original American Revolution started in 1776 and stopped dead in its tracks by the political developments of the 1960s.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At 61 years of age this book helped focus on the issues!, July 7, 1999
By A Customer
In his book, "America's 30 Years War", Balint Vazonyi defines the two political philosophies that have been written about and tried over the centuries as the "Franco-Germanic" Way and the "Anglo-American" Way. He has defined them as such, because to call them "Left and Right" or "liberal and Conservative" or "Socialism/Communism and Free Enterprise" causes people to ignore the facts.Thomas Sowell writes about modern liberals ..."What they have that is more important to them than specific knowledge of what they are doing is a vision of the world and a vision of themselves. Their test of a belief is not how it fits the facts but how it fits their vision. That is what makes them so dangerous." ...This in my opinion exactly fits the "Franco-Germanic" way of thinking, which has been proven dangerous by such examples as National Socialism, Soviet Socialism and the People's Republic of China and all have killed millions of people.Now we have the DLC, clinton and most Democrats and even some Republicans, along with their NATO heads of state, promoting "The Third Way" or Global Socialism.In this final year before Election2000 this book will help those interested in the Future of Our Country to focus on important issues ...rto
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book ever written on America's Founding Principles, August 20, 1998
By A Customer
The most concise, well thought out book ever written on the founding principles of American Society. Mr. Vazsonyi provides THE thorough overview of the foundations that make America, the product of over 3000 years of Monotheism and Western Civilization, unique among all nations. A must read for all immigrants who want to know how to be American, for those who feel something is not quite right with America but can't put it in concrete terms, and all students in courses titled "Government," "Civics," and "American History.".
With the personal perspective and clarity only an immigrant is likely to have, Mr. Vazsonyi effectively demonstrates the two dominant concepts of government - Anglo American principles clearly delineated in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and the French German Welfare State founded in the blood of the French Revolution and refined in Bismark's Germany. Mr. Vazsonyi shows how Communism, socialism, liberalism, and all the other "ism's" that have developed in the last two hundred years are manifestations of a very old concept of governance which tries to create the perfect society envisioned by a self-appointed elite using a centralized government administering a command economy. American Society, by contrast, created a set of principles designed to enable each individual to develop himself according to the advantages his circumstances allowed. Adoption of these principles produced a society of responsible and moral individuals, who built a great nation from the grass roots, without the help of any central authority.
America's 30 Year's War asks: In light of the prosperity and freedom the system created by our founders provided us, do we really want to adopt the statist European model that, in its various forms, has lead to the elimination of entire populations and the destruction of private property, capital, and individual freedom? By its existence, America has prevented the ultimate triumph of the European Welfare State and its approach to governance. Impossible to defeat externally, American Founding Principles are being attacked internally; primarily by those in government, entertainment, academia, and media who want her to be just as equal as all other nations. The approach is to use feel good words and concepts such as multiculturualism, regulation, social justice (what exactly does that term mean, who defines it and when will we know when we've achieved it?) assaults on property rights, group identity and class warfare, to make people feel warm, fuzzy, and receptive about various causes and movements that pound away at America's Constitutional Foundations. These same methods, used in the author's native Hungry by both German and Russian occupiers in the 40's and 50's, are used to produce passionate, caring "Useful Idiots." Mr. Vazsonyi suggests a return to Constitutional Principles will ensure the rebirth of the Original American Revolution started in 1776 and stopped dead in its tracks by the political developments of the 1960s.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Work of Brilliance and Infallible Logic, April 16, 2002
By 
Enigma "Cheers" (Constantly Moving) - See all my reviews
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While many authors seem to have written countless book before they final pen a magnum opus, it seems that Mr. Vazsonyi burst upon the literary world with a book that eloquently defines the difference between the two different political ideologies that are extant in the world today. The two ideologies according to the author are what have come from the Franco-Germanic school of thought versus the other that is based upon the Anglo-American philosophy. If there is a downfall of the book it is that the author has penned his tome to those that have a requisite knowledge of world and political history. It also presupposes that one has watched and understood the paradigm shift that Socialist entities (Communist, Fascist, Nazi's, and Bolshevik's) have taken over the last ten years. With that being said and if you are an intelligent observer of world politics this book is easily digested and imparts a plethora of political savvy upon the reader
At this point I am at a loss of how to review this book anything that I write will do a disservice the original text therefore I will just cull some quotes out of the book that I think will give the reader a fair assessment of the authors style and wisdom.
The frames of the Constitution understood the wisdom of making few laws. The fewer the laws, the broader the agreement.. The broader the agreement, the less need for enforcement. The less enforcement, the less friction between government and the governed. And the less friction, the less waste of time and energy. The time and energy thus freed vastly increase people's creative capacity.
That, in a nutshell, is the success story of the United States of America. (49)
Under a variety of labels, the former (Franco-Germanic thought) is unconcerned with the human nature, and seeks only those outcomes it considers "desirable." The latter (Anglo-American thought) has always engaged in creating the circumstances that, based on human nature and empirical evidence, will offer the best chances for individual success. While the later holds that successful individuals will constitute a successful society, the former believes that a good theory will produce a "good" society - communism being the ultimate "good society." (67)
Once again, the more groups we have, the more "rights" we have. The more groups we have, the farther we drift from the rule of law. The more groups we have, the more restrictions we have on our true rights: Individual rights.
Individual rights reflect our similarities; group rights emphasize our differences. Individual rights promote equality; group rights cultivate inequality. Individual rights permit every one of us to be special; group rights create stereotypes. Individual rights are unalienable, and are guaranteed by the Constitution; group rights are born at activist rallies, conferred by a party-political executive branch, and confirmed by a temporal judge. Group rights can be taken away be an even louder rally, a different regulator, a new judge.
Individual rights and group rights are mutually exclusive; we can not have it both ways.
Individual rights provide a sense of security. The greater the sense of security, the more of people's creativity will be converted to productivity. The higher the productivity, the greater the sense of independence.
Group rights instill fear. The greater the fear, the more the limitations on human activity. The greater the limitations the more total the dependency on the wielders of regulatory power.
Group rights - invented rights, that is - come, of course, with an important financial dimension. The bearer is entitled to unearned benefits - more directly put, to the fruits of other people's labor. Of greater significance, however, is the gradual destruction of society by the fear that attends group rights. (78-79)
Individual rights make up the foundations of liberty. Individual rights impose limitations on power. Individual rights had to be, indeed came to be, the first "slice of the salami." The dismantling of individual rights occurred through the establishment of group rights. And since group rights have no basis in law, their introduction ushered in the deconstruction of the rule of law. (116)
The work ethic, and competence in one's chosen endeavor, not only allowed Americans to achieve affluence and create abundance, they were also great equalizers. The idea that everyone out to work was a powerful mitigator of the different circumstances of birth. Of even greater consequence was the respect for competence which, in American society, replaced the scale of values assigned to various types of work. It was not what one did, but how one did it that mattered. Competence was expected whether a person swept floors or split atoms. (205)
If human reason governs supreme, religion and morality have no place and no legitimate function , and indeed, such is the Franco-Germanic position. Right and wrong become arbitrary categories, "subject to change without notice." The same applies to values and, ultimately, to facts. Truth cannot survive in the scenario. Consequently, telling the truth is not longer a requirement, and taking an oath carries no meaning. Anglo-American thought recognizes the capacity of human reason to argue and advocate either side of an issue with equal success. Human reason, therefore, cannot be left solely to it own devices. Moral guidance's is essential in reaching decisions that successfully walk the tightrope between the self-interest of and individual, and the community interest of society. (253-254)
These quotes are not be meant all inclusive of the book it is just a small smattering of the succulent material that you have at your hands. Good Reading.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is History Repeating Itself?, December 9, 1999
By 
Steven Fantina (Phillipsburg, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Teacher, Political Activist, and Internationally-Renowned Concert Pianist Balint Vazsonyi brings a truly synoptic perspective to his erudite chrestomathy. Having lived in Hungary under the control of both the nazis and the communists, he knows something of real world oppression which is radically different from the current widespread shibboleth of oppression that permeates so much of our present political discourse.
Amazingly (and terrifyingly) he sees many of the same deleterious trends in modern day America that wreaked havoc on Hungary and much of the world under both of these failed forms of government.
When he became a citizen in the early sixties, he was called an American; Hungarian-American would have seemed like a derogatory term as though his Americanism was somehow not quite legitimate. Nowadays hyphenated-Americans are commonplace and the artificial divisiveness employed by Hitler and Stalin is finding a foothold in the United States. Just as the multicultural mumbo-jumbo that's infiltrating American universities, corporations, and government programs is often masked in halcyon terms, the communists and nazis often called for behavior that was good for the "party" or "cause." Vazsonyi sagaciously points out that this whole concept of group rights is a Constitutional affront perpetuated at the cost of individual rights.
Among his most frightening observations concerns the phrase "politically correct." Many will shocked to learn that the term was originated by one of Stalin's sycophants decades ago, and the nazis were fond of the saying "socially correct." He perspicuously demonstrates how the entire group rights fad bears an eerie overlap to both nazism's and communism's enforced class struggles which lead to their divide and conquer reigns of terror.
This eye-opening book is a very good companion to Rabbi Daniel Lapin's similarly titled "America Real War," and they both wisely articulate how high the ultimate stakes are in the battle that currently rages in our land.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Is Important, May 4, 2002
By 
Michael Foudy (Falls Church, VA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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Most folks won't get past the title. But, Vazsonyi's book is really, really good.
Why? Well for starters, Mr. Vazsonyi has chosen to be an American. He was not born here. He didn't have to come here. He didn't have to stay. Mr. Vazsonyi is a talented musician who could live pretty much anywhere on the planet. This book explains his choice.
Second, and more important, Mr. Vazsonyi does a very good job of putting what has been happening in the United States since the middle of the last century into a coherent, relevant and easily understood political perspective. He traces the American political debate back to its origens in Europe and puts what we are and have been experiencing into context. The book describes the history of our competing political worldviews and makes that history relavant.
Finally, and most important, the book does a good job of pointing out what is at stake in this debate by clearly defining the worst case scenario. Mr. Vazsonyi does a great job of crafting that definition because the worst case scenario is one in which he came of age in Eastern Europe.
But, Mr. Vazsonyi's English is his second language and the prospective reader should be advised that his prose isn't as slick or easy to read as that written by someone like Michael Moore. Of course the difference is that Moore is wrong and Vazsonyi is right. So, this book is worth the effort.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for every American!, October 3, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: America's 30 Years War: Who Is Winning? (Paperback)
I have never given a book a five star rating, but this one is exceptional. Every American should read this very important book. The author has a very unique perspective having lived in Hungary before the Iron Curtain fell. He possesses insight that few of us have because of his background. One cannot appreciate what we enjoy in this country without seeing or hearing what life is like or was like under Socialist or Communist Regimes. This book is filled with very accurate historical data which strengthens the author's arguments and views. This book will either change your attitude toward liberalism, or at the very least make you begin to think and consider what the final objective of the liberal agenda really is. You owe it to yourself to read this thought provoking book.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tears the compassion mask off socialism., October 31, 1999
By A Customer
This book tears the compassion mask off socialism. Vazsonyi explains the roots of the only two feasible political schools of thought: socialist and free enterprise, and why they can only be in conflict. It would be helpful if more people realized just one small point discussed in the book: NAZI is the German acronym for the National Socialist German Workers' party. Socialism, according to Marx, Lenin, and all good commies, is the path to the utopia of communism. The NAZIs and the communists are just two sides of the same totalitarian coin. Vazsonyi also explains why socialism is unalterably incompatible with freedom.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars America's 30 years war, April 25, 2000
By A Customer
Blaint Vazonyi experienced life under an authoritative (a.k.a. Socialist, a.k.a. Franco-Germanic, a.k.a. Communist, a.k.a. Marxist, a.k.a. Utopian, a.k.a. Fascist, etc...) government, during his childhood in Soviet occupied Hungry. This uncommon experience provided Vazonyi, now a U.S. citizen, with a clear view of America's slow path to socialism. Having experienced two different societies, Vazonyi wrote about Americas slow transition toward communism, in Americas 30 Years War: Who is winning? Published in 1998, by Regnery, Washington D.C. ($24.95) Arguing that there is a "...difference between power and influence...," Vazonyi uses impressive English diction, clear to most people who have completed 9th grade, to express his idea. In this simple statement, "The power of Rome disappeared a long long time ago. Rome's influence will be with us as long as there remains an `us.'", Vazonyi lays the groundwork for his thesis: communist countries, do have an influence-, a bait- which America has swallowed, hook, line, and sinker. Every worthy critique must have an alternative to the discussed problem (Pierre Schlag, Prof. of Philosophy, U. of Colorado). This concept was neglected by Vazonyi, when he wrote this book. Think of Americas 30 Years War as "Armageddon", the 1998 movie in which a meteor was headed on a crash course towards earth. Imagine how horrible the movie would have been if Bruce Willis simply said "Well, there be that un-dandy meteor. I hope I die first." That is simply what Vazonyi does in this book, Vazonyi acknowledges current flaws, but poses no solution. Vazonyi made a noticeable blunder in his book. Dry spells without any warrants for arguments are followed by a surge of information, presented in quotations, parentheses, and other incomprehensible grammatical inadequacies. The absence of warrants, diminishes the respect each of his statements deserves from the reader. If you are knowledgeable of historic facts, or can completely indulge your blind faith into an Hungarian escapee, America's 30 Years War is full of commendable motifs. Vazonyi argues that America is forced into an undesirable "Social Justice," by providing too much freedom, or excessive freedoms (i.e. affirmative action, welfare, handicap rights, human rights, animal rights). Government will make "incessant demands in order to justify the confiscation of other people's property." Socialism, as Vazonyi stresses, is "the (irreversible) path to communism." This book should be a must read for every voter, who is interested in keeping our beloved country free from the chains of communism. I do not recommend it however, to anyone who is looking for an optimistic answer to society's ills.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best, February 12, 2000
This book is not bluffing but gets into the real world, full of facts and experiments.It goes back to the historical causes to explain the present conditions. I highly recommend its reading to political figures, teachers, patriots, those who want to preserve our disappearing liberty.
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America's 30 Years War: Who Is Winning?
America's 30 Years War: Who Is Winning? by Bálint Vázsonyi (Paperback - March 1, 2000)
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