Customer Reviews


183 Reviews
5 star:
 (37)
4 star:
 (59)
3 star:
 (54)
2 star:
 (24)
1 star:
 (9)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Page turner
I borrowed this book as an e-book from my local library. I got busy and forgot that I had it. Then I got an email from my library telling me that the book was due back in three days. I thought I wouldn't have time to read it but I decided to take a peek, just in case I might want to borrow it again. I couldn't put it down! I finished it in a day. It's a page turner. No...
Published 5 months ago by Alan Alexander

versus
51 of 69 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No real substance
It's a quick read, but it won't be long until you realize it's a story you've heard before...it's sort of like eating a rice cake. No real substance. It struck me as the sort of novel written for the sole purpose of being turned into a movie. Though unlike Robopocalypse, there's nothing remotely fresh about the premise of Amped. In fact, it's like reading a book about...
Published on April 29, 2012 by Lisa Love


‹ Previous | 1 219 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

51 of 69 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No real substance, April 29, 2012
This review is from: Amped (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
It's a quick read, but it won't be long until you realize it's a story you've heard before...it's sort of like eating a rice cake. No real substance. It struck me as the sort of novel written for the sole purpose of being turned into a movie. Though unlike Robopocalypse, there's nothing remotely fresh about the premise of Amped. In fact, it's like reading a book about superheroes where you don't care about any of the superheroes.

Owen thought he was an ordinary guy who had an implant to control his epilepsy. After Owen's father's research is seized by the FBI, he learns he's not just an amp, he's a ~special snowflake~ super amp. He goes on the run, and thus begins his journey. The plot is fairly predictable and so is the premise. You've seen it in X-Men and every other movie/novel that pits superhumans against normals.

As far as the writing style is concerned, I didn't care for Owen Gray's voice. It's an awkward blend of narration and description, blended in a way that doesn't quite work. Descriptive in the way an author would think so it never jives with Owen's voice. As it's told in first-person point of view, it should've invested me more in his character. Instead, the novel relies heavily on the plot so character development is almost nonexistent, one of Wilson's major shortcomings.

Given the lack of character development, it should come as no surprise that the romance feels contrived. And it makes no sense that Owen somehow is better at combat than guys who were in the special forces. Oh wait, it does -- he's the self-insert Marty Stu protagonist. That would explain why we only ever learn a few things about him.

Chapters aren't framed in the script-like manner Wilson used in Robopocalypse; in Amped, he incorporates news articles for more or less the same effect. Again, it proves to be a crutch for his weak world-building skills. Many are unnecessary, as the information is provided during the story. So they feel like awkward interruptions.

Another failing of the novel is that it doesn't paint a compelling enough argument for the amps. They act like normal humans don't have a right to be upset about smarter/stronger amps replacing them. So from the reader's perspective, it puts them at a disadvantage as far as garnering any sympathy goes. Wilson never overcomes that hurdle so in turn I never found myself rooting for the amps. Especially since many of them aren't nice guys.

There's only one major action scene in the first two parts. It's well written, Wilson really nails the action sequences. But there really needed to be more going for it early on. Some of the chapters are started too far into the scene. The first chapter is guilty of this. Instead of having an investment in what's happening via a good tension build-up, the reader spends more time trying to figure out what's happening and why is it happening.

Part three sets a great pace, and the sprint to the conclusion is fast and gripping. None of the "revelations" are surprising, but for the most part, the climax is satisfying. A little quick and too easy, perhaps, but it's the best part of the book.

Unfortunately, it was too little too late for me. For the most part, the story itself is uninspiring and unoriginal; I didn't think Wilson breathed enough life into it to make it a good novel. While Wilson isn't a bad author by any means, I hardly found Amped to be the "techno-thrill ride" it's advertised to be.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unrealistic world-building and cardboard characters, June 2, 2012
This review is from: Amped (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
It is pretty sad when, upon comparing "Amped" to "Robopocalypse," that the latter comes off as way more realistic. "Amped" is heavy-handed and preachy in a way that makes the book very difficult to read. This is too bad, because there's a really great theme to explore, the battle between 'superior' humans and the rest of us. The "X-Men" managed to do this well, but unfortunately, author Daniel Wilson fails here.

For me, the main flaw in the book was an unrealistic and simply fantastic (as in "fantasy-like" not "awesome") political and social background (or "world-building" if you prefer.) I am perfectly willing to grant authors, especially of science fiction, some liberty to stretch out current trends and imagine new ones, but some of the political events Wilson uses as the building-blocks for the novel don't meet the smell test, and furthermore, he manages to exaggerate them in ways that make no sense.

To take one example, the book starts with a Supreme Court ruling that Brown vs Board of Education doesn't apply to "amped" humans. As unlikely as such a ruling might be, anyone who has taken a college intro poli-sci class might extrapolate that this means that "amps" can be segregated into separate schools. But that's apparently not dramatic enough for the story, so the author, without really any explanation, just kind of randomly decides this means that "amps" somehow have their US citizenship simply stripped away, and also for good measure do not even have basic human rights (off to the camps!) He also invents cartoonish anti-amp political groups which operate with a lack of subtlety that even a 1920s Klansman would find embarrassing, and the book's concluding message of tolerance is delivered with the pedagogical force of an after-school special.

If somehow you are able to swallow the ridiculous political situation (perhaps with a "hey, a wizard did it!" attitude) and try to enjoy the story, you will probably get a bit of decent entertainment. The actions scenes are well done - in fact, they are very well done - this is Wilson's comfort zone, as anyone who read "Robopocalyse" can attest. Wilson's thoughts about how the "amp" neural interfaces works and how it might feel to have one active in your body, enhancing your senses, is entertaining, albeit scientifically implausible (the amp implants are supposed to enhance your existing senses and human potential, but he has them giving people the ability to dodge bullets a la Neo in the Matrix).

Wilson also does a poor job of developing the characters in "Amped." This is puzzling, because he showed, in "Robopocalypse" that he is capable of some subtle and engaging - and human - character development (and this in a novel about a robot uprising!) Here, when actually getting to know the individual humans and amps is key to the story, we get many one-dimensional cardboard characters ("the hero" "the villain" "the turncoat" "the great kid" and so forth)

I just can't recommend this book. If you haven't read "Robopocalypse" go read it instead. It was funny, smart, scary, and touching, told with the immediacy of an oral history of a terrible war just concluded. "Amped" just doesn't measure up, and I hope it is just a brief "sophomore slump" because I know Wilson has some great writing chops, they just are not on display in "Amped."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Main Character a Moron, November 17, 2014
This review is from: Amped (Audio CD)
1. I am probably not the ideal reader of this book. If I was 13-17 I may have found a way to like this book. This book has cursing and violence but no sex and, not being a parent myself, I have no legitimate opinion on what age this book is suitable for.

2. Long ago I came to hate books about stupid people. Prime example- guy who refuses to kill zombies b/c he knew the person once. I love my mom but my mom would never try to eat my brains so I feel certain I could cope. The main character in this book is at first uninformed about the abilities of his implants. but once he becomes informs he refuses to use those abilities to his own detriment, the deaths of more than 6,000 innocents and the imprisonment of his would-be girlfriend and her foster child. There is no reason for the main character to act so stupidly- he is just vaguely concerned about the implant. In short, I wouldn't want the main character of this book on my baseball team, let alone on my side in a civil war.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Page turner, June 30, 2014
I borrowed this book as an e-book from my local library. I got busy and forgot that I had it. Then I got an email from my library telling me that the book was due back in three days. I thought I wouldn't have time to read it but I decided to take a peek, just in case I might want to borrow it again. I couldn't put it down! I finished it in a day. It's a page turner. No great revelations, just good old sci-fi fun!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good summer read, June 7, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Quick read that keeps your attention. A little predictable towards the end, but entertaining nonetheless. Would have liked a little more Vaughn because he's so crazy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Prejudice and technology, May 28, 2014
The old fears the new, and the new fears the old. What makes a story like this so incredible is its likelihood of actually happening. In some ways we're already there. Though not strictly technological in nature, an amputee is now able to run faster than nearly every other human through the use of blade prosthetics. Wilson takes this idea to its logical conclusion with terrifying results. Very similar things have happened throughout history (in regards to anything different), and it didn't work out so well for those of a different color, religion, etc. I'd like to say we've changed, but that would be naive to the extreme. We are all sinners and need a Savior.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read, May 13, 2014
This review is from: Amped (Kindle Edition)
I loved Robocalypse, so I bought Amped and it was pretty good. I didn't totally believe the fight scenes at the end but I was able to enjoy them for what they were - a climatic part of the story. I liked that it didn't have an over the top romance angle, mainly cos I like my sci-fi with tech aspects and not romantic aspects, it was enough that I could tell that he was a 29 year old male, but he also had a mission. A good read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, March 21, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book was fast paced and an easy read. Hard to put down. The sci fi aspect was exceptional. I highly recommend this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book!, March 7, 2014
Masterfully written. This is the millennia version of 1984. The good news is that there is hope on the horizon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good, especially if you were to ever wonder about a dystopian future for "ehanced people" but no Robopacalypse ., February 18, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It's a fun read but a bit cheesy in terms of how the romance was sprinkled into it. I, however, really enjoyed exploring the potential social implications for people who have "ehnanced" themselves. I don't doubt for a minute people would resist much like Wilson discusses in this book. A scary thought for sure if or more likely, when things like this become possible.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 219 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Amped
Amped by Daniel H. Wilson (Hardcover - June 5, 2012)
$25.00 $19.29
Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.