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An Atheist's Handbook Paperback – December 20, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Xlibris (December 20, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1413476538
  • ISBN-13: 978-1413476538
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.3 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,733,338 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dan Culberson is a writer, editor, and publisher who came of age in the Sixties, which he remembers well, and who continues to write, edit, and live and think in the mountains.

More About the Author

Dan Culberson was graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a B.A. degree in English literature in the Honors Program from the University of Colorado, was president of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity and was also a member of the Phi Epsilon Phi sophomore men's honorary and the Hammers junior men's honorary.

Culberson was born in Carmel, CA, but grew up all over the U.S. and Europe. He has lived in Medford, OR; Lawton, OK (twice); Pampa, TX; Minot, ND; El Paso, TX; Tacoma, WA; Kennewick, WA; Erlangen, Germany; Lebanon, MO; Colorado Springs, CO (where he attended high school); Boulder, CO (where he attended college and now lives); and Heidelberg and Sindelfingen, Germany. He retired from IBM after a career in publications and is a writer, editor, and publisher who came of age in the Sixties, which he remembers quite well, and who continues to write, edit, live, and think in the mountains. He was named a Boulder Pacesetter in 1985 by the BOULDER DAILY CAMERA in the first year of that program and has been a film reviewer since 1972 for magazines, newspapers, radio and TV, whose current "Hotshots" reviews are on KGNU Public Radio in Boulder and Denver every week, as well as on TV and all over the Internet.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Queñón on November 20, 2008
Format: Paperback
I was incredibly disappointed by this book. Culbertson wraps a few very strong points and tidbits of good life information in a long-winded narrative full of unsupported arguments and forced analogies. At times reading this cursory "guide" to atheism, I honestly questioned whether Culbertson was crafting weak arguments for the benefit of religious followers seeking to debunk Atheism. The author seems to have very little truly worth writing about, and fills the space between the covers with information such as his complete college transcript and IQ score as though this somehow adds validity to his case. I gained more quality information on Atheism from 10 minutes on Wikipedia than in reading this 70 page bumble. This book has left me re-evaluating my religious identity as an Atheist, and may have moved me into the category of Apathetic Agnosticism. Not worth your time or money.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Anne R. Lieb on June 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
Culberson has not been on the talk-show circuit, he's a real person with real-life experience in a church-going family, on whom the light of reason dawned at an early age. His story is well researched, explaining how there were widely worshipped deities of virgin births and resurrections reaching back into antiquity.Handbook it is, an invaluable companion book if you buy the lofty tomes of today's famous declaimers.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Vinny V. on August 17, 2011
Format: Paperback
Pass. This book is so poorly written I finally decided to give up any hope that there would be some sort of redeeming value to make reading it through worth while. It has all the literacy of a Jr. High School student doing his best to write an "A+" essay, but nevertheless, his efforts are deserving of a "D" at best. There are long, nonsensical run-on sentences full of "and... and... and...", difficult to reconcile analogies and metaphors that stretch, childish arguments and equally childlike, self-serving conclusions. It is not a book for anyone seeking to broaden or investigate their understanding of the Atheist position. The lack of any sound, practical, scientific evidence or information, even on the most rudimentary level, regarding both the author's contention about religious belief, as well as any serious discussion of the known facts in comparative analysis of the Spiritual vs. the scientific or tangible beyond analogies make the book practically worthless for anyone seeking an intelligent discussion of the topic. The only positive comment I have to offer is that Dan Culberson appears to be sincere in his desire to really earn that "A".
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By PDB on July 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
As usual Dannie is playing the Wizard of Oz behind the curtain. This book still has me laughing. Luckily my library had put it on the "free" book cart or I would never have picked it up. I knew Danny back in the 80's and his deluded self-importance was always exceeded only by his drinking habit. He has always hidden behind a level of pomposity that was embarrassing in it's transparency. He's an atheist only because he could never accept that there was someone named "God" who was smarter than him. By the way, he didn't retire from IBM, they eased him out. Give this book a pass for sure.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gustavo Coutinho on March 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
I just finished this book and enjoyed it very much. It's too bad it seems as though it is not very well known. Maybe the length is too short for some people or maybe the title is mildly misleading and has discouraged some readers. I have to say that I'm very glad to have read it. I would describe this book as guide to understanding atheists and how they think even though at the same time it is limited to the mind of only one such person. It seems like the kind of book someone would write for their children or grandchildren to better understand where they are coming from. Sort of an autobiography with lots of good ideas and points to be made about life. It's not an all encompassing book by any means but it's a very nice introduction to atheism and a very interesting read. I saw nothing objectionable about it and the length is actually great for people with less time or short attention spans (teenagers who are interested in the subject for example). I've come across so many books about atheism and evolution in the past few years but this is one of the few that left me with a smile on my face when I finished.
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