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An Education: The Screenplay Paperback – October 6, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Trade; Original edition (October 6, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594484538
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594484537
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #877,662 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review



About the Author

Nick Hornby is the author of six internationally bestselling novels (High Fidelity, About a Boy, How to be Good, A Long Way Down, Slam and Juliet, Naked) and several works of  non-fiction including Fever Pitch, Songbook and Ten Years In The Tub, a collection of his 'Stuff I've Been Reading' columns from the Believer.  His screenplay for the film An Education was nominated for an Academy Award. He lives in Highbury, north London.
 

More About the Author

Nick Hornby is the author of the novels A Long Way Down, How to Be Good (a New York Times bestseller), High Fidelity, and About a Boy, and of the memoir Fever Pitch. He is also the author of Songbook, a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award, and editor of the short-story collection Speaking with the Angel. He is also the recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters E. M. Forster Award, and the Orange Word International Writers London Award 2003.

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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The characters are vivid and interesting, always with a motive.
Lauren G
This book is inspired by a memoir by Lynn Barber, reworked by Nick Hornby into a screenplay version, with some fictionalized details.
Lost Gecko
I am very upset and shocked to learn that the book I purchased is not the novel, it is the screen play.
SamiBekahHeike

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. M. Hauenstein on January 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
Nick Hornby wrote the screenplay for the movie and this is what is being sold on Amazon. The book by Lynn Barber is not being published in the U.S. until 2010. Both are titled "An Education." I heard an interview with Ms. Barber and she said there are differences between the screenplay and the book, although she approved the changes to make adjustments for the movie audience.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lauren G VINE VOICE on December 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
Jenny wants to be anything but ordinary. In this coming-of-age story, she dreams of a world full of music and dance, while in reality she's stuck in 1960s suburban London. That is until David, an older man, walks into her life and takes her on a whirlwind of a journey, where she loses not just her innocence but a bit of herself at the same time. Hornby's script is excellent, truly showing a middle-class London from yesteryear and wonderfully drawn characters inhabiting the streets. The characters are vivid and interesting, always with a motive. And the diary, which is included with the script, offers an interesting inside look at not just the writing process, but the creation of the film.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Aer Aktis on December 17, 2009
Format: Paperback
Nick Hornby's adaptation of Lynn Barber's memoir is beautifully written, and I think it will probably win best adapted screenplay this year. This publication of the screenplay also includes two extra essays by Hornby about the making of the film, and showing it at Sundance which are welcome.

I wish though that we had gotten a slightly less polished draft. It fits so closely to what is in the actual movie that I have a feeling it was retrofitted a little for publication, which is nice for those who just want a transcription of the movie, but for those more interested in the transition from page to screen and the changes that need to be made it may be a little slight (the addition of an alternate ending notwithstanding). Still it is a masterful screenplay of one of the year's best movies.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. M. Canty on March 17, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Do not be confused like I was: the book by Nick Hornby is the movie script and the ohter is the actual story itself.
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By W. Hamilton on April 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
The picture on the back of Nick Hornby's An Education contextualizes the central fight, for me, of the screenplay. David, Jenny, and Jenny's parents are standing in their living room. David is looking at Jack with soft yet deliberate charm. Jack is looking at David with a father's evaluation. Jenny is looking at her father uncertain, but surprised, about what's happening. Jenny's mom is looking at David, smitten. Which man is the right man: David, with his savoir faire, or the sensible, fatherly, Jack?

David's character is understandably attractive to Jenny: he has a sports car, knows the best night clubs, goes to art auctions, takes trips to Paris, and uses charm instead of hesitation. Jenny's dad is, well, her dad.

David's image is largely from the trappings of wealth, and the screenplay lends itself to an argument about a man's character and the source of his money, but I don't think it's a good one. There're certainly ethical issues: some theft, and real estate deals taking advantage of buyers who don't know any better. But a person can make money in questionable ways and be tortured by it. David's not tortured, though he's not a villain, either.

Hornby based this screenplay off a short story memoir. It's invention on top on invention on top of a real story, then. Jack and David were deliberately created for the screen, and they seem to characterize William James's self esteem equation. James says a person's self esteem is accomplishments divided by pretenses. A person can increase her self esteem by increasing her accomplishments; though, he argues, it's easier to do so by decreasing pretension. David seems to have that ratio backward: his self esteem comes from pretense.

And that's probably because he doesn't care about anything.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Introduction and Sundance Diary gives an excellent example of what it takes to write a screenplay, get a movie made and anticipate it's premier. And the film itself is an good example of an age-discrepant relationship. I highly recommend that you at least read the Introduction and Sundance Diary if you desire to write and sell a screenplay.

Katie
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By Amaranth on April 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
"An Education" is the heartbreaking coming-of-age story of Lynn Barber (who is renamed Jenny). Jenny is a teenaged Brit, growing up in the very proper early '60s (this is before the Beatles, Rolling Stones, the Who, and Pink Floyd) She finds an older lover in David, her cello teacher. He introduces her to Paris, the refined life... he was basically the metrosexual before such a term was invented. He is a charmer... and a player. He distracts her from her academic life. Jenny is a mere teenager at 16;David is (supposedly) a mature 38. They enjoy a brief, passionate love affair.

It's an expertly written screenplay, and in the end Jenny is tragically and devastatingly blindsided. After David has played fast and loose with her emotions, she comes to see what he really is--an overgrown boy.

*SPOILER ALERT* It turns out David has a wife and 4 year old son. Jenny is heartbroken for the wife David failed to be man enough to acknowledge- and that she was deceived. David definitely lacks High Fidelity

"An Education" is a poignant, powerful story. The ending had me tearful. It's that powerful. Hornby understands the human heart and the human condition.
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