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An Emotional Memoir of Martha Quinn Paperback – February 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 76 pages
  • Publisher: Drag City (February 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0965618331
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965618335
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 5.2 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,982,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Despite the title's invocation of the early MTV "VJ," this book is nothing less than a treatise on the decline and fall of rock music as a viable artistic and cultural medium and an enormously smart and entertaining one at that. Licht is a highly regarded guitarist, from his work with late '80s slack rockers Love Child (which included later gURL founder Rebecca Odes) to his collaborations with many of experimental music's leading lights, including Loren Mazzacane Connors. He divides the book into two essay-length sections. The first establishes Licht's demographic his first hits of Quinn-era MTV were during his middle school years in suburban New Jersey and quickly moves on to dead-on, song-by-song reconsiderations of the channel's fodder at the time: "Thompson Twins, `Lies': More good pop from three bad haircuts." Section two recreates the now-defunct genre of New York rock and the institutions that supported it, from CBGB to the New Music Distribution Service, linking its demise to gentrification. Licht then brilliantly explicates the "Clintonization of Rock," whereby rock explicitly dropped its us-against-them attitude in a manner exactly analogous to Clinton's cutting and pasting of liberal, conservative and populist issues and ideas with equal parts Kennedy, Carter and FDR; the result, Licht argues, was grunge. Written for survivors of the '80s and '90s rock scene and for anyone who cares about popular music and wants it to mean something, this little b&w book, with its wry and rueful looks back yet open and hopeful looks forward, may help shape a small rock renaissance. (May
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
Licht's analysis of what has gone wrong with rock is right on the money. Sure this is a short, lean volume (as a previous reviewer points out), but there is no fat here. You gets your money's worth and what may be obscure references to some, are actually nice clues for ferretting out unusual and expressive musics that mean something for a change... A great book. Too bad you don't see this kinda writing in ROLLING STONE anymore.
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By A Customer on September 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is one clever, acerbic book by a hipster musician who's not too jaded to give up on rock music. It progresses from memoir to cultural critique drawing on everything from Lydia Lunch to Joan Didion. And like any good pop (or punk) song, it's short. Impressive and really funny.
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3 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
I found this to be mildly entertaining, but at just 76 pages in length, I'd recommend just going to a local bookstore/coffee-house and reading it there! It's afterall, mostly one guy's opinion, and so full of references to many little-known bands that it's not really worth the money. It's kinda like talking to an opinionated friend about music for about 45 minutes--when you can't get a word in edgewise!!
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