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An Introduction to the International Criminal Court Paperback – April 26, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0521537568 ISBN-10: 0521537568 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 494 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (April 26, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521537568
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521537568
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,163,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This volume is the most comprehensive study of the rapidly evolving International Criminal Court (ICC) providing a probing analysis of such topics as jurisdiction, operations and the procedural regime of the court. This book begins with a superb historical sketch on the path of international criminal law: its fundamental concepts, history, and significance."
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Book Description

The International Criminal Court ushers in a new era in the protection of human rights. Schabas reviews the history of international criminal prosecution, the drafting of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and the principles of its operation, including the scope of its jurisdiction and the procedural regime. This revised edition considers the court's start-up preparations, including election of judges and prosecutor. It also addresses the difficulties created by US opposition, and analyses the various measures taken by Washington to obstruct the Court. Indispensable for students and practitioners.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
Schabas succeeds fully in introducing the reader to the main features of the new International Criminal Court (ICC). His book is a model of legal exposition. He writes clearly, situates the ICC within the history of international law, relates the substantive law of the ICC to the jurisprudence of the Yugoslavia and Rwanda tribunals, and has interesting comments on the negotiating history that led to the ICC. After finishing Schabas' book, I was struck most of all by the care and thought that went into the design of the ICC, which conforms to the main lines of international law as the law has developed since 1945. The ICC is the world's best hope for bringing war criminals, human rights violators, and genocidalists to justice. It is a disgrace that the U.S. has tried to smother it in the cradle. (I am a U.S. State Department official.)
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Lee D. Carlson HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on January 4, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For this reviewer, who is definitely not a legal expert, this book was read with the goal of understanding to what extent pre-emptive wars can be viewed as `legal', to discover the reasons why the United States chose to withdraw its participation in the International Criminal Court, and to gain basic knowledge on the tenets and origins of international law in order to find out if indeed the current conflict in Iraq could be viewed as a `war crime' or some other severe violation of international law. Before reading this book, this reviewer was very unknowledgeable about legal concepts and reasoning in the context of international law, and had the opinion that international legal agreements were very fragile and tenuous. This view did not really change after reading the book, but its perusal did offer a few surprises and was thought provoking to a large degree. Like most legal treatises, this book suffers from the typical `tyranny of the footnote' that accompanies legal or history books. This minor annoyance that causes the flow of the reading to be disrupted is perhaps compensated by the need for the reader to know that the sources are available and that they can be checked if necessary.

Readers who are not legal experts will no doubt think of the Nuremberg trials as being the best representative of what an international court can accomplish given the jurisdiction. Their biases in this regard are in fact true as is brought out many times in the book, particularly in the discussion on genocide and `crimes against humanity', which the Nuremberg trails were set up to deal with after the second world war. The word `genocide' apparently originated with Raphael Lewkin in 1944. Lewkin wanted to make sure that crimes against groups were prosecuted.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Nussbau on February 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
I have the first edition of this book (2001) and I would like to point out that the bulk of it consists of three appendices: the Rome Statute, Elements of Crimes and Rules of Procedure and Evidence. These three documents are public information and make up over half the book (218 pp.). The original content of the book is only 164 pp. which would be a much smaller book on its own. Of course the content is of good quality. Looking at the table of contents of the third edition, it seems the original content has really expanded with the development of the court. So make sure you get the edition that you order on amazon!
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Format: Paperback
As you have seen people here already have reviewed this book. I'll be very brief and just say that if you are interested in ICC this is your book!!! I will just say about the quality of the book: it's paper quality is very good, its not short, it's a bit wider than average books and for that reason it's not very thick, so you can carry with you and don't feel unfomfortable. In every sense, a great book....
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dinyar N. Jalnawalla on March 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
I have attended author's lectures at Strasbourg. This book is a nice historical introduction about the ICC. I guess after the court is established and the Judges settle down on their chairs and volumes of case laws come out in Report form -- till then this book is a must read for everyone interested in this field.
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