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Comment: Copyright 1957. Paperback with very worn and creased cover. Name inside front page. I did not notice any other writing inside when flipping through the book. Pages have small dog-ears and curling from poor shelving.
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An autobiography;: The story of my experiments with truth (Beacon paperback, no. 35) Unknown Binding – 1965


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Product Details

  • Series: Beacon paperback, no. 35
  • Unknown Binding: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (1965)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007I9HGI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (192 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,602,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Gandhi's nonviolent struggles in South Africa and India had already brought him to such a level of notoriety, adulation, and controversy that when asked to write an autobiography midway through his career, he took it as an opportunity to explain himself. Although accepting of his status as a great innovator in the struggle against racism, violence, and, just then, colonialism, Gandhi feared that enthusiasm for his ideas tended to exceed a deeper understanding. He says that he was after truth rooted in devotion to God and attributed the turning points, successes, and challenges in his life to the will of God. His attempts to get closer to this divine power led him to seek purity through simple living, dietary practices (he called himself a fruitarian), celibacy, and ahimsa, a life without violence. It is in this sense that he calls his book The Story of My Experiments with Truth, offering it also as a reference for those who would follow in his footsteps. A reader expecting a complete accounting of his actions, however, will be sorely disappointed. --Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Language Notes

Text: English (translation) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

If you intend to actually READ this book, buy the Dover edition.
Amazon Customer
We live in difficult time as well and these lessons will serve us all in our lives and helping others.
Bob
An Autobiography or The Story of my Experiments with Truth by Mohandas K. Gandhi.
Jane Olson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A. Vinayak on December 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book should not be read for literary purposes. It will come as an disppointment for people who expect poetry or prose in their readings. My idea was to learn more about Gandhi and I was very satified as this book nearly accomplished that for me. This book is as simple to read as the man himself. Gandhi tells us most sincerely and honestly that he would not have been what he became, if it was not for certain events that changed his life. Even in his writings Gandhi reflects his modesty and simplicity. He does not fall short of acknowledging his weaknesses and his wrongs. Great philosphy right out of the mind of the great philospher!
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52 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Bill Butler on May 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
Well, we all follow "the experts" (although at 48, I am beginning to learn). We all follow the authorities. What would happen if one just kept a totally blank mind toward everything and learned from just plain LIVING. Gandhi makes it clear at the beginning of the book that this is the only way to gain truth. Not to be strongly influenced by others. His agreements and fondness of other theologians really only comes after his experiments. They have to agree with him first. As you begin to read this book, you are on a jouney. It's like being a Martian or being from another planet simply because Gandhi will simply not take anything as truth unless he has experimented with it himself. He was very much the spiritual scientist. This book is also very easy reading. The chapters are short enough to stop and come back to as well. And it is journey which Gandhi makes clear that anybody can follow. You can't really follow this man's experiments. He wants you to do your own experiments. So this book is really quite an adventure. Gandhi's politics, as he makes clear in this book, really stem from his experiments in truth. You can begin yourself. Wake up, tell your wife she is fat, and see what happens! Gandhi came to the conclusion of always practicing "ahimsa". He would practice it over and over again to see if it worked. And he came to the conclusion that it did. As he once said, "Ahimsa is heaven". Ahimsa means non-violence in thought, word, and deed. One can still defend oneself while loving one's enemy. He saw "satya", or truth as synonymous with non-violance. This man stole at one point, eat meat, was far from celibacy. Buy and read this fabulous scientific inquiry into "How to Live". Then start experimenting for yourself. Good luck on your journey. And please be careful! Gandhi nearly killed himself SMOKING!
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have always admired Mr. Gandhi, but really knew very little about him. This book tells of his early life, something most biographies skip choosing to focus on his life in India.
Great historical detail of colonial India, living in England and South Africa. A must read for anyone interested in Mr. Gandhi or that period of history.
The book has also influenced greatly the way I view life. A very spiritually uplifting book, even for non-Hindus.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Rick on November 6, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Want to read this book, but the Kindle edition for sale here is plain awful and clearly was not edited or proofread. It is rife with misspellings, formatting errors, and random line breaks in the middle of sentences. Oh well -- I should have checked out the sample first, but for 0.99 cents it seemed like a no-brainer. I suppose if you really want a cheap version, it could suffice, but I will either be looking for a hard-copy or getting it somewhere else.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have had misgivings about Gandhi, his thoughts, and his actions. I believe, after I have read this book, that unfortunately, I had a very superficial knowledge about this great person. I still do not agree with many of his policies, do not see him as absolutely infallible, and certainly do not wish to deify him. However, these views have been instilled in me by Gandhi himself as he points out in this marvellous book, that he does not think that he is always correct. He mentions, time and again, that what he says and does, is only his opinion. But he sincerely practices what he preaches, and shares his ideas with all of us in the hope of making the world better. His humility, straight-forwardness, and love of truth touches us all. A truly great man and a very inspiring book.
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24 of 30 people found the following review helpful By David Marshall on July 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Unlike a couple readers below, I was pleasantly surprised to find this a very readable and well-written story. I felt like I was meeting the great reformer in person, with no interpreters or spin doctors between us.
Gandhi surprised me with his transparency. He honestly expresses doubts about (or limited awareness of) God, his own weaknesses, and the mistreatment of women in Hinduism. He frankly relates quarrels with his wife ("numerous bickerings" that end in peace, with the wife the victor -- I wonder about that part, though) and that his son disagreed with his ascetic lifestyle. I gave this book five stars not because I agree with all of Gandhi's ideas, but because he explains them well, the stories he tells are so interesting, because the search for truth is what life is all about, and because Gandhi is one of the great figures of the 20th Century.
A couple years ago I did a research paper on the young Mao Zedong. One thing that surprised me here was to find that, despite their very different attitudes about violence, the fathers of the world's two biggest modern states shared much in common. Both agreed that "the life of labor is the only life worth living," and founded communes with friends as young men. Both strengthened themselves through ascetic self-disciplines. Both were men of contemplation and action. Both shared an ambivalent relation to the party that was the vehicle of their success, yet were also masters at the use of power. Both freed their countries from foreign domination over many decades, by use of dialectic strategy and an appeal to the peasants.
Gandhi was a man of ideas and of action, and also I think of passion, despite his philosophical commitment to "desirelessness.
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