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Product Details

  • Paperback: 276 pages
  • Publisher: Avalonia (February 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905297300
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905297306
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 0.6 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,384,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Payam Nabarz is author of 'The Mysteries of Mithras: The Pagan Belief That Shaped the Christian World' (Inner Traditions, 2005), 'The Persian Mar Nameh: The Zoroastrian Book of the Snake Omens & Calendar' (Twin Serpents, 2006), and Divine Comedy of Neophyte Corax and Goddess Morrigan (Web of Wyrd, 2008). He is editor of 'Mithras Reader An academic and religious journal of Greek, Roman, and Persian Studies': Volume 1(2006), Volume 2 (2008), Volume 3 (2010). He is also the author of 'Stellar Magic: a Practical Guide to Rites of the Moon, Planets, Stars and Constellations' (Avalonia, 2009), and 'Seething Cauldron: Essays on Zoroastrianism, Sufism, Freemasonry, Wicca, Druidry, and Thelema' (Web of Wyrd Press, 2010). He is the editor of 'Anahita: Ancient Persian Goddess and Zoroastrian Yazata' (Avalonia, 2013).

Dr Nabarz's writings have also appeared in numerous esoteric magazines including Touchstone (the Journal of Order of Bards, Ovates, Druids), Pagan Dawn (the Journal of the Pagan Federation), Stone Circle, The Little Red Book, Pentacle, White Dragon, Silver Star, Cauldron, Fezana (Zoroastrian Journal), and the Sufi Magazine.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Cranow on October 18, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Payam Nabarz has compiled a nice size collection of authors and essays about the
Mazdean Goddess Anahita. Starting out as the head goddess in the Iranian Mazdean
religion Anahita found herself fluctuating in importance depending on the
religio-politics of the time .

Despite the fact that Iran is a Muslim country traces of Anahita's reverence can
still be seen. Pregnant women go to her shrines for a safe and easy delivery.
Female saints are bit thin disguises of who she is.

Often times compared to the Mesopatamian Ishtar or Inanna. She is a goddess of
love and war. Her symbols include the eight pointed star, Lions, beaver pelt and
sword sheath hanging from her side.

Like Aphrodite and Venus she is also a goddess of water. Being most likely a
river goddess, many shrines were dedicated to her that were right beside rivers
and hot springs. The hot springs with there varying Radon and mineral content
were often used for hydrotherapy. Her planet is Venus so Anahita is a Venusian
goddess .

Zarathustra came up with Zoroastrianism . Zoroastrianism is the monotheistic
version if Mazdeanism. Ahura Mazda is the head god while Ahriman is like the
devil. Such religious ideology had a massive impact on monotheistic religion
like Judaism.

Even with the elimination of many gods Anahita found herself at the second place
if the trinity. She is the virgin mother of Mithras. Bestower of sovereignty by
bequeathing the sword and rings of power.

Reading through this book you will see the Iranian influences if Iran on Western
Pagsnism, Christianty and Far Eastern Buddhism. Lady Anahita is the lady and
Mithras is The Lord .
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tomtobias on May 1, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found especially noteworthy the discussion of hot mineral springs, developed for medicinal purposes, and associated with Anahita--pages 184-189.

The account focuses on the time period of the Achaemenid Empire, without however, delineating the archaeological evidence precisely. It is a worthwhile discussion, but falls short in summarizing evidence.

The other aspect of this very important heritage of the Persian influence on ancient Greece and Egypt, involves Hippocrates' who described the virtues of water immersion, for healing of wounds and injuries. It would have been instructive to learn more of the interaction between the Persians, Hindus, Greeks, and Egyptians.
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