The Anatomist's Apprentice and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $2.76 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Anatomist's Apprentic... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Anatomist's Apprentice (Dr. Thomas Silkstone Mysteries) Paperback – January 1, 2012


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, January 1, 2012
$12.24
$0.01 $0.01
Multimedia CD
"Please retry"

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Introducing The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now


Frequently Bought Together

The Anatomist's Apprentice (Dr. Thomas Silkstone Mysteries) + The Dead Shall Not Rest (Dr. Thomas Silkstone Mysteries) (Dr. Thomas Silkstone Mystery) + The Devil's Breath (Dr. Thomas Silkstone Mystery)
Price for all three: $34.55

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Dr. Thomas Silkstone Mysteries
  • Paperback: 310 pages
  • Publisher: Kensington House Pub Ltd; Original edition (January 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780758266989
  • ISBN-13: 978-0758266989
  • ASIN: 0758266987
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (136 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #322,779 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

''CSI meets The Age of Reason . . . Well-drawn, intriguing cast of characters . . . Full of twists and turns . . . Vivid details . . . A page turner!'' --Karen Harper, New York Times bestselling author

''From dissection table to drawing room, this visit to late eighteenth-century England is chock full of intriguing twists and turns.'' --Kate Emerson, author of The Pleasure Palace

''A deftly plotted debut . . . When you think the puzzle is solved, she reveals another surprising twist which leaves you marveling at her ingenuity.'' --Carol K. Carr, author of India Black

With its inviting typeface, touchy-feely paper stock and come-hither cover illustration of an English street scene shimmering under gaslight, THE ANATOMIST S APPRENTICE Tessa Harris s first historical novel about a pioneering American anatomist in London, pretty much jumps into your hands. There s even a glossary (with entries for "French pox" and "miasma," even "grave wax") to let us know exactly what we re in for with this densely plotted yarn about a crafty 18th-century poisoner wreaking havoc on the Oxfordshire estate of a noble family...we await indeed, demand the sequel." --New York Times Book Review

From the Author

When I was five years old, I visited the dungeons of an old castle with my parents. The guide was telling us about the oubliette, the place where they threw prisoners and literally forgot about them. Without warning he turned the light off, plunging the space into darkness. We were blind for a few moments. But instead of terrifying me, the experience had the opposite effect. I wanted to know more about people, lives, events from the past. So,from a very early age, I loved history: buildings, books, stories.

I went on to read History at Oxford University and qualified as a journalist and editor, contributing to several national publications such as The Times and The Telegraph. I also acted as a literary publicist for the English TV presenter and novelist Pam Rhodes.

Winning a European-wide screenplay writing competition led to the optioning of a screenplay. (Here's where the history comes in.) Set in 18th century England, it highlighted what has to be one of the most fascinating periods of England's past. The screenplay languished in what's known as development hell, but I was determined to tell some of the stories I'd discovered during my researches into the period. The result is "The Anatomist's Apprentice," the first of a series of Dr Thomas Silkstone Mysteries - stories from late 18th century England that are based on true stories.

Until last December I was editor of a regional glossy magazine and was regularly heard on BBC local radio. As well interviewing dozens of celebrities, I interviewed writers at literary events in front of audiences. My most recent interviews were with Oscar winner Julian Fellowes (screenplay for Gosford Park), Barbara Taylor Bradford and Hollywood legend Leslie Caron.

Customer Reviews

The character development was very well done.
Diane Ward
This story went on too long, and too much significant plot detail was crammed in at the very end.
ajcb
I look forward to reading the next book in the series.
Lisa A.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Quixote010 VINE VOICE on January 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
Rating: 4.5 stars

One of the more interesting books I have enjoyed recently is this one...not so much for any one thing I can put my finger on, but for a variety of reasons.

To begin, I especially enjoyed the author's sense of the period. Readers will not be overwhelmed with detailed regarding England in the late 1700s, but there are enough references to attitudes, personalities and the general environment to pull one into the era. As noted into overview, Thomas Silkstone Is an brilliant anatomist, educated in Philedelphia, who has come to London to continue his studies and lecture. Recognized as perhaps the best anatomist in England (although we never really are told how he obtains that distinction,) he is approached by one Lady Lydia Farrell to determine the death of her brother.

Readers should not be fooled into thinking that Silkstone is an early version of Sherlock Holmes. On the contrary, whereas Holmes uses his skills of observation for deduction, Silkstone depends upon science to ascertain his findings. By incorporating the limitations and understandings of the time, one can imagine The good doctor struggling by candle light to dissect cadavers before the natural heat decomposes the body. It is Holmes' brilliance at deducing people that makes him successful. Sillkstone's brilliance stems from deducing science.

I also liked that Silkstone has heart. Unlike many super sleuths (Holmes of course) He not only wants to find the answer because of his scientific nature, but because he is attracted to Lady Farrell. That combination makes his quest for finding the answers he seeks more personal.

I was also drawn to the book because of the characters.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By RadDoc on July 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
I could not complete reading this book because of the poor writing and incorrect anatomic details. Besides, I had just finished reading a C.S. Harris Sebastian St. Cyr novel and had a Jefferson Bass novel on hand to start--no need to suffer through this book any further! I found some of the descriptive details odd and poorly done (Oxford described as a series of knucklebones joined by the tendon of river??). The few day-old corpse's mouth filling with corpse wax-wrong location and much too early. Regarding anatomic accuracy--among other things, it is inexcusable to state the aorta brings freshly oxygenated blood to the lungs in a book that is supposed to be about anatomy--especially when earlier in the book the correct role of the aorta in destributing oxygenated blood from the heart to the body was noted (in case you're interested, the pulmonary artery carries blood from the right ventricle to the lungs, and the pulmonary VEINS bring the now oxygenated blood back to the left atrium, from which it flows into the left ventricle and is pumped from the into the aorta and into the body). The above two writers are far more knowledgable and are far better writers-and the St. Cyr books are set in Regency England, if you want very well-researched and written historic details. There were several places incorrect words were used; "reprehended" where "reprimanded" was obviously meant was only one instance. Like other reviewers, I noticed forced attempts to incorporate quaint period words without success. The story was just not believable and it was unpleasant to read-so I stopped midway through the book, which I will now happily return to the library.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Harris sets her tale in 1780 London and Oxfordshire, England, where the shocking death of young Lord Crick unleashes a barrage of gossip and innuendo. Writhing in agony as he breathes his last, Crick's unearthly screams leave the household reverberating with tension and suspicion, most of which falls on the young man's brother-in-law, Captain Michael Farrell, who will inherit the estate. Wracked with grief, Lady Lydia Farrell visits Dr. Thomas Silkstone, an anatomist from Philadelphia studying in London. At twenty-five, Silkstone is pioneering the field of forensic detection, the perfect candidate for Lady Lydia's request to have the cause of her brother's death determined- and whether her husband is implicated in the horrific event. Thus begins the systematic unraveling of a mystery that culminates in deadly conflicts and long-buried secrets.

While timing the pace of her novel to fit the era, the slow and precise evolution of the story is perhaps its biggest obstacle- one that is belied by an action-filled second half and an ample supply of devious characters and suspicious circumstances. Once the young anatomist is fully involved in the case- and more than a little enamored of the lovely Lady Lydia- the action accelerates until the final denouement. To be fair, Harris is grounding her tale in the history of anatomy and the scientific community, not to mention the reluctant embrace of new theories by an entrenched status quo. The protagonist is engaging, a blend of scientist and gentleman unskilled in the devious nature of his fellow humans, but certainly a quick study. It remains to be seen whether Harris will flesh out her forensic detective Dr. Thomas Silkstone in a projected series. Luan Gaines/2011.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

When I was five years old, I visited the dungeons of an old castle with my parents. The guide was telling us about the oubliette, the place where they threw prisoners and literally forgot about them. Without warning he turned the light off, plunging the space into darkness. We were blind for a few moments. But instead of terrifying me, the experience had the opposite effect. I wanted to know more about people, lives, events from the past. So,from a very early age, I loved history: buildings, books, stories.

I went on to read History at Oxford University and qualified as a journalist and editor, contributing to several national publications such as The Times and The Telegraph. I also acted as a literary publicist for the English TV presenter and novelist Pam Rhodes.

Winning a European-wide screenplay writing competition led to the optioning of a screenplay. (Here's where the history comes in.) Set in 18th century England, it highlighted what has to be one of the most fascinating periods of England's past. The screenplay languished in what's known as development hell, but I was determined to tell some of the stories I'd discovered during my researches into the period. The result is "The Anatomist's Apprentice," the first of a series of Dr Thomas Silkstone Mysteries - stories from late 18th century England that are based on true stories.

Until last December I was editor of a regional glossy magazine and was regularly heard on BBC local radio. As well interviewing dozens of celebrities, I interviewed writers at literary events in front of audiences. My most recent interviews were with Oscar winner Julian Fellowes (screenplay for Gosford Park), Barbara Taylor Bradford and Hollywood legend Leslie Caron.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?