Anatomy 2 2004 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(15) IMDb 5.1/10

A young intern discovers grisly goings-on at a Berlin hospital, eventually crossing paths with the sinister Anti-Hippocratic Society.

Starring:
Ariane Schnug, August Diehl
Runtime:
1 hour 42 minutes

Anatomy 2

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Thriller, Horror
Director Stefan Ruzowitzky
Starring Ariane Schnug, August Diehl
Supporting actors Herbert Knaup, Birgit von Rönn, Klaus Schindler, Barnaby Metschurat, Hanno Koffler, Beate Abraham, Oliver Kraatz, Rosie Alvarez, Chimeta Reinemann, Rosalinda Nolasco-Jacht, Josie Thamm, Maria Dolores Schramm, Monika May Villanueva, Medy Hoepfner, Milagros Saliwann-Neumann, Boris Pietsch, Rosel Zech, Murali Perumal
Studio Columbia TriStar Home Entertainment
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

I can almost say it wasn't at all.
john david
You see again an aspiring medical student, a secret or two in a prestigious hospital, and so on and on.
Tsuyoshi
Unfortunately, "Anatomy" isn't style over substance -- it's all style, no substance.
E. A Solinas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Libretio on March 13, 2004
Format: DVD
ANATOMY 2
[Anatomie 2]

(Germany - 2003)

Aspect ratio: 2.39:1 (Super 35)
Theatrical soundtracks: Dolby Digital / SDDS

An intern (Barnaby Metschurat) at one of Berlin's top hospitals is targeted by a charismatic doctor (Herbert Knaup) who's been conducting illegal experiments on some of his best students, involving the replacement of various muscle groups with all-powerful, synthetic substitutes. But the drugs needed to curb the various side effects are highly addictive, and lead to madness and murder...

Forged from the European success of its popular predecessor (ANATOMY [2000]), this unnecessary sequel - only tenuously linked to the previous film - is described by its makers as 'less horror, more action', and therein lies the crux of the problem. After a genuinely horrific opening sequence in which one of Knaup's former students (August Diehl) gatecrashes a swish medical gathering and leaves a trail of devastation in his wake, the movie foregoes genuine horror for a slow build-up of tension as our naive hero is first seduced by his newfound friends and then realizes their dreams of a 'master race' are no different from old-style Nazi ideology, and just as misguided and lethal.

The Gothic setting of the first film is replaced here by the faceless corridors of an ultra-modern hospital, and aside from the opening scene, there are no truly memorable set-pieces to distinguish the movie from its run-of-the-mill US counterparts. Writer-director Stefan Ruzowitzky and cameraman Andreas Berger conspire to make it look as slick and stylish as possible, but it simply doesn't 'click' the way it should.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By L. L. Utley on December 25, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
German actress Franka Pontente from Run Lola Run and the first Anatomy movie is back once again, and she is still running. I enjoyed the film, athough I must admit I enjoyed the first Anatomy better. Twenty minutes into the film, I was wondering where is Franka?? I was getting a little bored before Franka appeared on-screen. She doesn't show up until later, but she is worth the wait. However, this time, she is an investigator, and not the novice student she was in the first film. The setting of the movie is a Berlin hospital, and once again, we see a medical program that has gone awry. The murder scenes are just as potent as the first movie. And as always, it was good to see Franka again, whom I think is very...very...talented. If I had to compare her to an American actress, she definitely reminds me of Clair Danes. Although the first Anatomy was better, you will still enjoy this movie and be on the edge of your seat.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Genevieve Hayes on July 25, 2008
Format: DVD
The Anti-Hippocrates society, first introduced in "Anatomie", is at it again, this time at a hospital in Berlin. Joachim (Barnaby Metschurat), a well-meaning, young doctor becomes involved in the illegal experiments of the society, when he is given the opportunity to join an elite research group that is attempting to develop synthetic muscles, which could potentially save the life of Joachim's brother, who is dying of a degenerative muscle disease.

"Anatomie 2" started off better than the original "Anatomie", with an excellent first half hour that sets things up nicely, but it degenerated shortly after that. Most of the final hour of the film is made up of an endless string of operations conducted by and on the members of Joachim's research group, which is both repetitive and boring (and confusing - maybe it's just me, but I'm sure some of the scenes were contradictory).

Franka Potente, star of "Anatomie", appears briefly in this film (her character has given up on medicine and is now a cop who is trying to shut down the Anti-Hippocrates society), but her total screen time couldn't be more than about 10 minutes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 6, 2008
Format: DVD
Anatomy 2 (Stefan Ruzowitzky, 2003)

I wasn't expecting much from Ruzowitzky's sequel to his fine Anatomy, which may be why I enjoyed it more than most people seem to have, if the ratings and reviews on IMDB are any indication. Sure, it doesn't measure up to the original, but you can't have everything.

Plot: The Anti-Hippocratic cult from the first film are still active, and are always looking for a few good men. In this case, they're after the brilliant newcomer Jo Hauser (L'Auberge Espagnole's Barnaby Metschurat), who both chafes under the school's strict adherence to procedure and has a brother with a degenerative nerve disease. Jo will do anything to cure his brother, and that's where the Anti-Hippocratics come in--they've been working on artificial muscles. Of course, there's this problem of a lack of willing guinea pigs...

There's nothing new here, but Ruzowitzky (The Counterfeiters) is a very good director, and he's a pretty good writer, too. You may have seen it all before, but it's done here with style, and the whole artificial-muscle thing is incredibly neat. ***
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
**1/2

From Dr. Frankenstein to Dr. Mengele, Germany has developed quite a reputation for...hmm.. how shall we put it?..."unconventional" men of science.

It's appropriate, then, that the German film "Anatomy 2" should be a brave-new-world sci-fi thriller that deals with the issues of biomedical ethics and just how far science should be allowed to go in trying to "improve" on Mother Nature.

Professor Muller-LaRousse is a world famous neurosurgeon who has been covertly conducting questionable experiments, implanting synthetic muscles into perfectly healthy young men and women (who also happen to be his devoted interns). Even though a disturbing number of these "guinea pigs" have died as a result of the procedures, LaRousse forges on, undeterred and undaunted, convinced - as any mad scientist worth his salt would be - that scientific advancement cannot be allowed to run aground on the shoals of a few trivial dead bodies. His plan is to create some sort of "master race" of invincible semi-humans. Jo Hauser is a promising young doctor who has come to Berlin to work and study under LaRousse, confident that he will be able to make a real difference not only in the lives of others but particularly in the life of his younger brother who has fallen victim to a degenerative neurological disorder. Filled with idealism, Jo allows himself to be pulled into LaRousse's group of sycophantic acolytes, perhaps to his everlasting regret.

The film is obviously intended as a modern day allegory of Nazism - what with its emphasis on group-think, unethical medical experimentation and talk about creating a "master race" - but the movie feels just too much like other - and better - dystopian sci-fi fantasies to be very effective.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews