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Ancient Israel: From Abraham to the Roman Destruction of the Temple, 3rd Edition Paperback – November 26, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0205096435 ISBN-10: 0205096433 Edition: 3rd

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Ancient Israel: From Abraham to the Roman Destruction of the Temple, 3rd Edition + Cultures of the Jews, Volume 1: Mediterranean Origins + HarperCollins Study Bible - Student Edition: Fully Revised & Updated
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson; 3rd edition (November 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0205096433
  • ISBN-13: 978-0205096435
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #601,591 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The book arrived and I am enjoying it immensely. It is one of the better resources on the background of the Old Testament and I'm especially impressed by the parade of authors. If I have occasion (I hope) to teach Old Testament Survey, this will definitely be one of my texts." -- Professor Harry Hight, Virginia Highlands Community College

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steve Reina VINE VOICE on January 2, 2014
Between 1200 BCE and about 350 CE (if one includes the New Testament) the Bible went from the first to the final stages of its composition.

This places the Bible in stark contrast to many other religious works which were composed over shorter compositional periods including the Qur'an (composed roughly from 612 CE to the reign of Caliph Omar, roughly some forty years later), the Tau Te Ching (reputedly composed over a single lifetime) and also the Analects of Confucius (again composed reputedly over the period of a lifetime). Because of this unique feature of the Bible's extended compositional time archeology becomes uniquely helpful in assisting us in answering some basic and important questions like:

Are the statements the Bible makes when it speaks historically consistent with what history, via the archeological record, independently reports?

In a related way to the first question, are the practices and events described by the Bible independently supported or conradicted by the independent archeological record?

What additional detail can we gain by recourse to the archeological record? Can it be used to help us better understand of the motivations and life styles of the Bible's writers or its actors?

For the faithful of course, no recourse to an independent archeological record is necessary. But even among this select group their remain people who's faith (of whatever stripe) is secure enough that it need not fear a recourse to any independent record or differing opinion.

As it evident by this book's title, this work is now in its third edition (the first having been published roughly some ten years earlier
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Alecia on October 26, 2013
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I enjoyed reading this. However, the 3rd edition really isn't that much different from the other editions -just a couple updates. (I know this because I own the 2nd edition as well)
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By james on December 15, 2014
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Read this for my Biblical Archaeology class. I rarely ever skipped the readings since it's quite interesting.
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9 of 15 people found the following review helpful By E.L.B. on February 16, 2013
This book is fair-to-good. I was bothered initially by its 'bibliocentric' perspective in several chapters, especially the ones on the patriarchs, the exodus, and the settlement. Although Shanks expresses in the foreward that it would be too much material for a single scholar to control masterfully, I feel they could have been condensed easily into one essay on the 'emergence of Israel'.

I mean by 'bibliocentric' that certain essays are written, partially, as if they were dialoguing with someone who sees the bible as a source of religion, not history or even religious history. So the authors have to clarify that they are not approaching it from a devotional standpoint (because they're not fundamentalists) or that they mean not to offend those who do. But I got over it because it is meant for popular (but educated) consumption, and most if not all the contributors do have some measure of religious attachment to the bible anyway. However, I'd rather have the history of Israel related to me straight without the pandering.

The articles are informative, but not outstanding. For example, McKarter's & Horn's chapter on the divided monarchy offers interesting tidbits of information previously unknown to me, but merely follows the biblical story with ANE texts and archeological data thrown in to confirm or disconfirm the major public events in the bible. It was almost boring reading. Lemaire on the unified monarchy was more of the same. Contrast Meyers who is much more easygoing and shorter, although his section on the diverse sectarian formations in Judaism should really be an excursus. It doesn't have much to do historically with Israel as a whole given the politically-oriented nature of most of this history.

That's another disappointment I have though.
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