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Ancient Puebloan Southwest (Case Studies in Early Societies) Paperback – December 13, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0521788809 ISBN-10: 0521788803

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Product Details

  • Series: Case Studies in Early Societies (Book 5)
  • Paperback: 338 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (December 13, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521788803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521788809
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #567,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

...a tour de force of archaeological synthesis...[I]t identifies major themes in prehistory, while also providing a sample of the great variation... -- Canadian Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 29, 2005

John Kantner has crafted a captivating and highly readable book devoted to ancient Puebloan developments in the American Southwest. -- Kiva, Vol. 71, No. 1, 2005

Book Description

In this accessible and illuminating study, John Kantner traces the evolution of Pueblo society in the American Southwest from the florescence of the Chaco and Mimbres in the AD 1000s up to and including the early decades of contact with the Spanish in the 16th century. Based on a diverse range of archaeological data, historical accounts, Pueblo oral history and ethnographic records, this is an invaluable introduction for all students of the Pueblo Southwest, and vital reading for any archaeologist with an interest in the origins of early civilizations.

More About the Author

John Kantner, Ph.D., joined the University of North Florida in August 2013 as the Assistant Vice President for Research. Prior to that, he was Vice President for Academic & Institutional Advancement at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, NM, an independent center for research in the social sciences and humanities. From 1999 to 2006, Dr. Kantner was a faculty member in the Department of Anthropology & Geography at Georgia State University in Atlanta, where he achieved the rank of associate professor with tenure prior to his departure.

Dr. Kantner received his doctorate from the University of California-Santa Barbara, where he studied archaeology, anthropology, geography, geochemistry, and evolutionary theory. His research focuses on the archaeology of ancient societies, with a particular interest in the processes by which complex social and political regional institutions emerged from communities of comparatively simple horticulturists. His research is explicitly comparative, and he has collaborated on projects throughout the United States, as well as in Costa Rica and Peru. In addition to several books, Dr. Kantner's research appears in journals such as Human Nature, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, Journal of Anthropological Research, Journal of Archaeological Research, Journal of Archaeological Science, and Historical Archaeology.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Smallchief on October 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, and Wuptaki are three of the best known of the Indian ruins that dot the landscape in the high desert country of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Utah. To this day it is difficult to comprehend how these Indians thrived in a region of short hot summers, little rain, and poor soil -- and not only fed themselves but left behind spectacular monumental buildings. Adding to the mystery is their sudden abandonment of their major sites in the 1100s and 1200s.

The author surveys the knowledge and theories about the ancient peoples who became the modern day Pueblo Indians. He follows the development of the Anasazi and Mogollon traditions from their beginnings thousands of years ago until the 1700s, after the arrival of the Spaniards. The book is illustrated with more than 100 photos, maps, and charts and 25 sidebars that take up interesting topics such as cannibalism, construction methods, domestic animals, ballcourts, burials, and leadership. The emphasis is on thoroughness as the author briefly describes the findings and gives a hearing to the theories of hundreds of archaeologists and other scholars. The bibliography runs to more than 30 pages.

There is much of environmental determinism here for in the climate of the Southwest small changes in the weather made all the difference in the lives of the inhabitants. Scholars have meticulously reconstructed temperature and precipitation records for the last 2,000 years and the author attempts to correlate the rise and fall of Indian cultures with precipitation and temperature averages.

"Ancient Puebloan Southwest" is probably a bit too dense for the casual reader, but offers those interested in archaeology and the Southwest a thorough and up-to-date account of the Anasazi the Mogollon and the proto-historic Zuni, Hopi, and Rio Grande Pueblos.

Smallchief
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By cc on October 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
it was a gift to a friend who seemed to like it. by this I would recommend it to anyone.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Simply the best overview of current research, not only because it spans the history of research and theory, but because it is beautifully written. Wish it were available on Kindle!
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By Amazon Customer on December 15, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very informative
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