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And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May-June 1864 (Great Campaigns of the Civil War) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Great Campaigns of the Civil War
  • Paperback: 283 pages
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (March 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803271190
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803271197
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #193,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“The six-week military campaign that began that May, energetically recounted in historian Mark Grimsley’s And Keep Moving On . . . became a legendary duel. By focusing on the Wilderness, Grimsley also takes us into a moment when the Civil War battlefield – if not combat itself – was transformed.”—Washington Post
(Washington Post)

"High quality of research, analysis, and storytelling. . . . An excellent synthesis of a sprawling military operation that extended well beyond the lines of Grant and Lee."—Daniel Sutherland, The Journal of Southern History
(Daniel Sutherland The Journal of Southern History)

“This excellent book covers what is commonly referred to as Grant’s Overland Campaign. . . . I enjoyed this clearly written book very much. The clear maps are helpful to the reader. . . . This one provides more than enough information for the reader on each battle, as well as the overall Virginia campaign. Though a bit pricey, I recommend this interesting book to all Civil War readers.”—Duane Benell, Civil War Courier
(Duane Benell Civil War Courier)

“Grimsley’s work is a synthesis that includes traditional and ‘new’ military history methodologies, typical of the Great Campaigns of the Civil War series of which is it is the latest volume. Yet Grimsley does not get bogged down with a traditional narrative. . . . Grimsley’s analysis and historiographical review of the generalship of Grant and Lee are thorough and fair.”—Michael B. Ballard, Journal of American History
(Michael B. Ballard Journal of American History)

"An excellent job of coloring in the details of the severity of the hardships soldiers endured. . . . Grimsley has provided Civil War readers with a balanced, yet provocative study of the Virginia war in the spring of 1864."—Stephen Engle, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
(Stephen Engle The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography)

"A superb overview of the 1864 Overland Campaign. . . . Grimsley has produced one of the finest operational Civil War histories in recent memory."—Major James Gates, USAF, Military Review
(Major James Gates, USAF Military Review)

“A first rate campaign study that gives appropriate attention to the wide range of peripheral operations that came under Grant’s and Lee’s purview away from the main front. His book is clearly, sometimes graphically, written.”—Brian Holden Reid, War in History
(Brian Holden Reid War in History)

“Grimsley skillfully analyses the campaign’s significance in his final chapter, an analysis that sets his work apart from others. . . . The series as a whole, and this title in particular, will stand the test for another hundred years.”—North Carolina Historical Review
(North Carolina Historical Review)

“What he achieves is an excellent narrative that explains theater operations against the political backdrop of the 1864 presidential election and the relationship between major battles, subsidiary offensives, diversionary raids, and naval operations that compose the overall campaign. This is the first book length work to examine the Virginia Campaign of May and June 1864 as a unified whole.”—David R. Dean, H-Net Reviews
(David R. Dean H-Net Reviews)

“This is a fine interpretation that will be of interest to both general and scholarly audiences.”—Lloyd Benson, Military History of the West
(Lloyd Benson Military History of the West)

“This new paperback edition of Mark Grimsley’s highly acclaimed study of the Overland campaign of 1864, a volume in the Great Campaigns of the Civil War series, brings to students and teachers of the Civil War a military narrative of uncommon intelligence and lucidity. . . . Grimsley’s superb account should help bury the now-tired Lost Cause interpretation of Lee and Grant and their ‘duel’ and allow us all to keep moving on away from older readings that defined the campaign almost wholly in terms of casualties toward a fuller understanding of the way(s) the campaign presaged the Union’s modern strategy of multiple offensives that won the war.”—Randall M. Miller, Civil War History
(Randall M. Miller Civil War History 2007-03-26)

“This particular book is very interesting, featuring long chapters with lots of quotes from primary sources, several photos from the Civil War period and several clear maps. Grimsley also supplies an annotated bibliography. . . . A good addition to any Civil War collection.”—Rambles.net
(Rambles.net)

"Engagingly written, thoroughly researched, and thought provoking, Grimsley's And Keep Moving On is the best single-volume history of the Overland Campaign yet published."—Gordon Rhea
(Gordon Rhea)

About the Author

Mark Grimsley is a professor of history at Ohio State University. His books include The Collapse of the Confederacy, Civilians in the Path of War (Nebraska 2001) and Gettysburg: A Battlefield Guide (Bison Books 1999).

More About the Author

I'm a professor of history at Ohio State. Over the years I've received three teaching prizes, including the Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award, which is the university's highest distinction of that kind. I enjoy teaching, so I'm very proud to have received such recognition.

I've written two books: _And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May-June 1864_; and _The Hard Hand of War: Union Military Policy Toward Southern Civilians, 1861-1865_, which won the Lincoln Prize in 1996. I have co-written or co-edited five other books and wrote the Civil War chapters for the military history textbook now in use at West Point.

Since December 2003 I have maintained a blog (web log) devoted to military history as an academic field. It received the 2005 Cliopatria Award for Best Individual Blog.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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The book also comes with very adequate maps and the campaigns are given in fast moving detail.
Daniel Hurley
In his acknowledgements section, Grimsley pays special tribute to Gordon Rhea who has, thus far, published five excellent volumes on the Overland Campaign.
Bruce Trinque
Grant and Lee not only had to take these maneuvers into account, they often supervisedthem as well.
Joe Zika

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Trinque VINE VOICE on October 15, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Mark Grimsley does not seek to break new ground in "And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May - June 1864". Up front he states: "This is primarily a work of synthesis. As such, my foremost thanks are due to the authors of the specialized studies on which it is based." These specialized studies are, either through their daunting size or their limited availability, unfamiliar to most persons interested in the Civil War. Mark Grimsley has performed a valuable service for such readers by drawing upon those narrow analyses to craft a comprehensive and lucid narrative about the Overland Campaign and its associated operations. In less than 250 pages of narrative text, Grimsley covers the fundamentals of not only such grand battles as the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, but also Butler's fumbled thrust towards Richmond, cavalry raids in West Virginia, and fighting in the Shenandoah Valley. Moreover, he relates the pace of military matters to the political background (1864 was a Presidential election year in the North) and to state of civilian morale.
In discussing combat, Grimsley includes sufficient first-hand detail so the reader does not lose sight of the ultimate reality that the contending armies were made up of living, breathing, dying individual soldiers. Nonetheless, the book's primary focus is on the senior commanders. Grimsley states in the preface that he "evaluated the principal leaders as sympathetically as possible, always bearing in mind that they were intelligent men who operated under extraordinary conditions and pressure ... I have encountered few historical actors - even such perennial goats as Ben Butler - for whom I could not muster at least some respect." It seems that Franz Sigel, justifiably in my opinion, fell outside the author's range of sympathy.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Joe Zika TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign May - June 1864 written by Mark Grimsley is a book about the massive operation called the Virginia Campaign about ow Ulyses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee saw the war. But, this is not just a battle book, it is a book with the political context of the 1864 presidential election.
Not only the election, but appraises the motivation of soldiers, appreciates the impact of the North's sea power advantage and questions convential interpretations; andexamines the interconnections among the major battles, subsidiary offenives, and raids.
The Contents of the book is as follows:
Campaign Plans and Politics
The Wilderness
"Grant Is Beating His Head aganist a Wall"
The Collapse of Grant's Peripheral Strategy
"Lee's Army Is Really Whipped"
"The Hardest Campaign"
"It Seemed Like Murder"
The Campaign's Significance
"The art of war," maintained Lt. Gen. Ulyses S. Grant, "is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike at him as hard as you can and as often as you can, and keep moving on." Grant the bludgeoner, Lee the master of maneuver were, in reality, the two commanders were almost identical in style.
Grant took over the hard luck Army of the Potomac and Lee had his Army of Northern Virginia and that ensured that the spring campaign of 1864 would pit the Civil War's two most successful generals against one another in a duel that became legendary.
The fighting was not restricted to a duel between Grant and Lee, either. In order to maximize his chance of success, Grant put into motion virtually every Union soldier in hte eastern theater. As a result, the struggle between the main armies... eventually dubbed the Overland campaign...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Hurley VINE VOICE on May 9, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is not the ultimate book on the overland campaign as Rhea's series of books from the Wilderness through Cold harbor captures all the detail of troop movements, decisions and action along with great documentation. But Grimsley is the big picture book of the overall campaign explaining the global strategies of Grant's attack plan for Virginia with coordinated raids (Sigel, Averell, Crook) along with a major move on Petersburg (Butler) while concentrating on Lee. Excellent short bios on the participants and Grimsley get sraight to it as why actions failed or succeeded. There is a remarkable chapter after the North Anna that covers a very serious side as the author details how the casualties fared as the armies continued to move, he covers the effect of fatigue, battle stress, the fate of prisoners that all grips the reality of war. A very fascinating, and appropriate account of the human effects of war on the participants. The book also comes with very adequate maps and the campaigns are given in fast moving detail. Even after reading Rhea's great books, as I have, I have enjoyed Grimsley's book that virtually stands back and looks at the action and movements of the commanders in broad strokes while explaining their decisions and reactions. For example, after understanding Grant's odd command structure of directly taking charge of Sheridan and Burnside's corps while Meade commands the Army of the Potomac, one understands how stressful and difficult it was for Meade to coordinate his attack plans. If you are going to throw one book in your knapsack for a field tour of the Overland Campaign, this is a great book to read and bring as a reference. Its going with me on my Pamplin Spring tour of the Wilderness through the North Anna this weekend.
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