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And Party Every Day: The Inside Story Of Casablanca Records Hardcover – November 30, 2009


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And Party Every Day: The Inside Story Of Casablanca Records + Nothin' to Lose: The Making of KISS (1972-1975) + Makeup to Breakup: My Life In and Out of Kiss
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 310 pages
  • Publisher: Backbeat (November 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879309822
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879309824
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #562,473 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Neil Bogart died in 1982 and, though there has been talk of a biopic for years (it was rumored in 2001 that Gene Simmons wanted to produce it as a Mike Myers vehicle), the actual story of the Los Angeles label he masterminded remained just a series of tall tales and exaggerated drug gossip until now. Larry Harris has emerged from his music-industry semiretirement to pen And Party Every Day: The Inside Story of Casablanca Records.... Harris says, We came out with a New York attitude, trying to change things and made a little noise in the process. The book conveys this sense of excitement, as this ambitious, wild bunch from [New York] lands in the supposedly chill, post-hippie L.A. of the Eagles, CSNY and the long-haired ladies of the canyons.... The book contains detailed evidence of the chaotic manipulation of the music charts in the wild days before computer scanning. This fell mostly under Harris purview, and he offers fascinating insight on what these legendary promo men did back in the day. --LA Weekly

A delightful new memoir pulls back the veil on an almost-forgotten era.... Larry Harris was front and center--from Woodstock and the discovery of KISS, to the founding of Casablanca, Studio 54 and the origin of Disco. He relates each story with a refreshing humility, often sharing the recall of his own overwhelmed surprise.... And Party Every Day: The Inside Story of Casablanca Records is not just an insider account of a major portion of American rock n' roll history--it's a work of cultural anthropology. Those dreams, those experiences, those trips and those days, may well be gone forever...but thanks to Larry Harris we've been blessed with an unabashed look back into our most fantastic and frivolous past. --Blurt.com<br /><br />The rise and fall of the world s most debauched label. The home of Donna Summer and The Village People during their 70s heyday, flamboyant mogul Neil Bogart s Casablanca Records had a license to print money which they promptly blew on drugs, bribes, and outrageous promotional stunts. As cofounder and Bogart s cousin Harris had a front-seat view of the madness. It s all in here, from the drug-fueled meetings to flying a birthday cake first class to Donna Summer, though there s the inescapable sense that it was always going to end in tears. --Q Magazine

All this is detailed in no-holds-barred fashion in Harris new memoir, And Party Every Day: The Inside Story Of Casablanca Records, co-written with Curt Gooch and Jeff Suhs. The most dirt-filled music book since Mötley Crüe s The Dirt, And Party Every Day is always entertaining and frequently jaw-dropping, from Harris description of acting as runner for an enormous amount of cocaine for Curtis Mayfield and several female hotel guests during the Buddah days to tales of calling his own positions on the Billboard charts. --The Onion AV Club<br /><br />Casablanca Records, whose roster included Donna Summer and the Village People, symbolized the excesses of the era better than any other label. Harris, cofounder of Casablanca, with Gooch and Suhs (coauthors, Kiss Alive Forever), tells the insider s story of Casablanca, from its 1973 founding through corporate struggles (and lots of sex and drugs) to its 1980s disintegration under the conglomerate PolyGram. Harris details the early career and the breakthrough of Kiss as well as Parliament Funkadelic. He also corrects the story of Casablanca as told in Fredric Dannen s Hit Men. Verdict While the graphic details may make even adult readers uncomfortable; anyone open to finding out what the disco era at Casablanca was really like will love this. --Library Journal Xpress Review

Home to Kiss, Donna Summer, and the Village People, Casablanca was the quintessential 1970s record label, run by hype-crazed promo men who believed the best way to make money was to spend mountains of it. Former Casablanca VP Harris tells jaw-dropping tales of chart manipulation, desks piled with drugs...label execs throwing Frisbees out office windows at hookers, and Rodney Dangerfield, who was signed to the label, carrying a Noxzema jar of cocaine. --Rolling Stone Magazine

Casablanca Records, whose roster included Donna Summer and the Village People, symbolized the excesses of the era better than any other label. Harris, cofounder of Casablanca, with Gooch and Suhs (coauthors, Kiss Alive Forever), tells the insider s story of Casablanca, from its 1973 founding through corporate struggles (and lots of sex and drugs) to its 1980s disintegration under the conglomerate PolyGram. Harris details the early career and the breakthrough of Kiss as well as Parliament Funkadelic. He also corrects the story of Casablanca as told in Fredric Dannen s Hit Men. Verdict While the graphic details may make even adult readers uncomfortable; anyone open to finding out what the disco era at Casablanca was really like will love this. --Library Journal Xpress Review

About the Author

About the Author

Larry Harris began working for Buddah/Kama Sutra Records in the summer of 1971 as the local New York promotions man, and in 1973 joined his cousin Neil Bogart in founding Casablanca Records. He became senior vice president and managing director of the company in 1976 and left Casablanca in the fall of 1980. Larry was born in New York and now lives and works in Seattle.


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The great American story.
Michael Gerbino
I really enjoyed reading AND PARTY EVERY DAY: THE INSIDE STORY OF CASABLANCA RECORDS by Larry Harris, along with Curt Gooch and Jeff Suhs.
Alex Honda
You walk away from the book with so much more respect for KISS and their ability to work despite all this.
Erica Hughes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By E. Dvorin on October 27, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I heard about AND PARTY EVERY DAY earlier this year and have been waiting for it ever since. I got my copy the other day and was blown away. I had some high expectations and they were all surpassed ...by a mile.

The book is full of stories about Casablanca's wild parties (the money and drugs flying around the place were just amazing...how did these guys not get arrested?) and their very high profile acts like Donna Summer, The Village People, and Kiss. I thought I knew a lot about Casablanca Records, but I didn't. The book is very well written and even though it's full of details, it's very easy to read, and very hard to put down.

I enjoyed learning about the business side of the music industry, but I was just adddicted to the feeling it gives you of being right there when it was all happening. You feel transported into the 1970s and I was rooting for Neil Bogart the whole way through and found myself thrilled when the label broke through and cringing at all their mistakes.

I've always been a big fan of the 1970s and have read a ton of books and articles about it, but AND PARTY EVERY DAY is the first time I've felt like I was actually there. Highly recommended.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Tim Brough TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you were into popular music in the seventies, you knew Casablanca. Started in 1973 by Neil Bogart, Casablanca became the house of Disco and the home of KISS. They also became synonymous with the drug fueled excesses of the seventies and the triumph of image over substance, despite the fact that the label delivered some of the best music of the decade. Hell, Casablanca was the seventies for many in the music world. Head Honcho Neil Bogart was a talent finder extraordinaire and a showman on a level with PT Barnum. No claim was too exaggerated and no gesture was too grandiose. It was once said that he would spend five dollars to show one dollar in profit, and when Casablanca ultimately fell under its own weight, a certain magic of the music industry evaporated with it. Author Larry Harris worked at Buddah/Kama Sutra Records in the summer of 1971, and in 1973 joined his cousin Neil Bogart in founding Casablanca Records. He saw firsthand the carnival of wilding that was Casablanca, and it's his first hand story that fuels "And Party Every Day."

While there are plenty of anecdotal stories about Casablanca's biggest stars, like initial signing Kiss and superstars Donna Summer and The Village People, the bulk of "And Party Every Day" focuses on how a young Neil Bogart took his idea for an artist driven record company and built his empire from the ground up. Larry starts the story with a reminiscence of being at Woodstock and realizing he's found his place in the world, then joining Neil in his dream.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Wilen on December 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I knew Larry Harris back then, and lost touch with him until last month, when we found each other on Facebook and he told me out this history of his cousin Neil Bogart and Casablanca Records.

His outrageous stories of girls and drugs and booze and cash and payola and the Mob -- all true.

Neil's pad high above LaCienega Boulevard? I stayed there at Casablanca's expense on a Los Angeles vacation. I was a radio programmer for a very important rock FM station.

The crazy goings on at the Buddah >>> Casablanca office in NYC? Been there, done that. Sold a bunch of jazz albums to Joe Fields, who I fondly remember.

Michael Klenfner stories? All true, both his radio days and promo days. I remember when he came to Philly and showed off his hot-off-the assembly-lines Honda Civic which was only a little bigger than today's Smart cars.

The huge Klenfner in the little car smelled just like circus clowns.

Larry's description of the teeny Casablanca office above Sunset is perfect. It looked they furnished the joint with props from Warner Brothers.

Roys Chinese restaurant on the other side of Sunset with the notorious private room? Yesirree bob.

The book names some great names -- George Gerrity, Jerry Stevens, Larry Magid; and others not so great: Artie Ripp, for example, and Bucky Rheingold.

If you read Joe Smith's "Hit Men," stories of promo guys with guns are not new to you. I was threatened by the guy Joe accurately describes as carrying a photo of a "dead gook" in his wallet to intimidate people.

Not Larry or Neal. They were all about the love. Little packets of love.

I ended up quitting the record business in the early 1980s after a final career peak that found me way up in the 9000 Sunset Building, looking down on the Roxy.

Larry stayed in a lot longer and has lots more stories.

True stories.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on October 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover
No one in this book gets out alive, or so it seems, for Larry Harris and his co-writers have the scoop on everyone whether high or low, and most of them were quite high during the Casablanca years.

From a business point of view, the revelations here are mainly about hos the company never was successful, despite a milliondollar promo campaign and a lot of money juggling on Harris' part. he was ordered to cook the sales figures for PolyGram to show many more sales of Casablanca products than actually occurred; this despite the fact that the returns would be coming in constantly to contradict his lies. Harris seems to think this is a standard business practice, but for his sake I hope the statute of limitations on fraud will prevent them from carting his butt to hail like Bernie Madoff! Neil Bogart characterized the Casablanca years as a time of "profitless prosperity," and that seems apt.

I enjoyed hearing how a group of Brooklyn-born salesmen with great ears for what would sell turned the industry on its ear by making a commitment to disco, or all things. The discovery of Giorgio Moroder and Donna Summer is an amazing story, but even the flops of Casablanca have their charm. Take for example the signing of "Stallion." Ever heard of them? They were going to be Casablanca's answer to the Eagles, but when Harris asked their Svengali to make them sound more like the Eagles, he should have known right away it wasn't going to fly, since the producer genuinely puzzled, asked, "Who are the Eagles"?

The Village People and Kiss are the other big names here, but every page has a good story about someone, usually revolving around "blow." "Blow" allowed Larry Harris, one of the plainest men in show business, to live the Hugh Hefner lifestyle with a revolving cast of available and beautiful Hollywood starlets. Thus he was living every man's dream, and never had to look at a mirror throughout the entire 70s. Go, Larry, go!
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