Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Angel Child, Dragon Child (Reading Rainbow) Paperback – August 1, 1989


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.80 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$99.99
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 420L (What's this?)
  • Series: Reading Rainbow
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (August 1, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590422715
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590422710
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 9 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #141,652 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
Also a great way to learn more about the Vietnamese culture.
Diana C. Mata
This book is an excellent resource for those looking to provide a more multicultural education for their child or students.
Erica Simon
My son is 5 years old and the media director read this book to his kindergarten class one day in media center.
Lynn Milam

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a wonderful story about a Vietnamese child trying to adjust to life in the USA. Ut has trouble with children at school because she is different. Haven't we all been there? Angel Child, Dragon Child is very realistic. Many children are brought to the USA by their families looking for a better life for themselves and their children. Unfortunately, not all people are accepting of those that are different. Surat does a terrific job of showing how UT sees herself as both an angel child and a dragon child. This story is one that should be used in classrooms across the country. Children can learn from this book that just because people look or dress differently, does not mean they do not have the same feelings as everyone else. Surat portrays how communities and people can come together to survive life. This is a wonderful story of accepting differences in others that children and adults should read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "teeecher25" on July 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Angel Child, Dragon Child is a wonderful story about a Vietnamese child trying to adjust to life in the USA. Ut has trouble with children at school becasue she is different. Ut has difficulty speaking English and her clothes are different from what American children wear. After fighting with a boy, she is forced to sit in a room and talk to the boy. Can they work things out? This story is very realistic. Many children are brought to the USA by their families looking for a better life for themselves and their children. Unfortunately, not all people are accepting of those that are different. Surat does a teriffic job of showing how Ut sees herself as a dragon child, when she is feeling or thinking mean thoughts, and as an Angel child, when she is being kind to others. This story is one that should be used in classrooms across the country. Children can learn from this book that just because people look or dress differently, does not mean they do not have the same feelings as everyone else. By having the whole school pull together to try to raise money to bring Ut's mom over, Surat is portraying that communities and people need to work together to survive life. This is a wonderful story of accepting differences in others that children and adults should read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By fredtownward VINE VOICE on November 10, 2011
Format: Paperback
A modern picture book about an immigrant child trying to fit in at school despite prejudice and bullying? From Scholastic? Why, my eyes were rolling so hard I very nearly blinded myself! But that is NOT what I found when I regained my sight and started to read. Instead I found a flat out gorgeously illustrated tale of the youngest daughter of an immigrant Vietnamese family so poor that they had decided to leave the Mother behind in order to bring all six children over to America with the Father. (According to a note in the back, this was partially based on a true story.)

Missing her mother every single day (she carries her photo around in a wooden match box), Hoa Nguyen struggles to fit in at school and to ignore the (probably, for the most part) unintentional cruelty of her clueless classmates, as she knows her mother would command. But one boy in particular makes a point of teasing her until she finally snaps. The resulting fight lands them both in detention with the unusually clever punishment of being ordered to stay there until they can work together well enough to produce a report about Vietnam, Hoa telling, Raymond writing.

In the process they come to know and understand each other a good deal better. So the next day when the principal reads their story aloud to the entire class, it is Raymond of all people who thinks of a solution to the problem (and proceeds to shout it out without raising his hand first, of course.)

Some have complained that Raymond's behavioral change is unrealistic for a true bully, but I wouldn't call him a true bully. He struck me more like the clueless young boy of olden times who thought the best way to impress a girl he secretly liked was to dunk her ponytail or pigtails in the inkwell.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Marykay on May 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
I found this to be a delightfully illustrated, sensitive book that looks at the realities of an immigrant family from Vietnam. It shows w/ pastel like illustrations the home environment, but also the school children becoming aware of a new culture being introduced to them.

And, even a bully can become a friend.

I'm not going to sell my copy of this book, like I do most books. I'm going to save if for my daughter who is studying to be an elementary school teacher.

I would highly recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
The "Angel Child,Dragon Child" story is about a little girl named "Nguyen Hoa" and her mom was far away in Vienam, so she had to go to a American School. The lesson it taught was that dont be scared to make changes. The Age Level is about 8 years old. I think the book was really good because it teaches alot of people how it is to change everything around you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Persop on June 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The creation is a classic. The artwork could not be more appropriate as well as adding to the possible comprehension of the story. Story written from a teacher's perspective as with the artwork is neither too much or too little. Colors have varying degrees of importance in Asian cultures. The story is both how children react to each other and the inherent hope. The story can be read many times to receive many messages. It is possible the reader may either question their own feelings or desire to learn more. Lastly it is an unintended complement to the teaching profession and how schools can widen our perspectives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?