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Angelology: A Novel (Angelology Series) Hardcover – March 9, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Angelology Series
  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Adult; First Edition edition (March 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670021474
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670021475
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (371 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #609,800 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. A covert age-old war between angels and humans serves as the backdrop for Trussoni’s gripping tale of supernatural thrills and divine destinies. Sister Evangeline, the secretary who handles all inquiries concerning the archives of angel arcana at an upstate New York convent, receives a letter from researcher V.A. Verlaine inquiring about an unknown link between the convent and philanthropist Abigail Rockefeller dating to 1943. It turns out that the Rockefellers were interested in a legendary artifact associated with an order of fallen angels. That priceless artifact is coveted by Verlaine’s employer, Percival Grigori, a Nephilim—offspring of the union between mortal and angel parents—who will stop at nothing to retrieve it for the awesome power it will give his race over humanity. Trussoni (Falling Through the Earth) anchors this fanciful dark fantasy to a solid foundation built from Catholic church history, biblical exegesis, and apocryphal texts. Suspenseful intrigues and apocalyptic battle scenes give this complexly plotted tale a vigor and vitality all the more exciting for its intelligence. 9-city author tour. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Through the door opened by The DaVinci Code comes Trussoni’s entry in the hugger-mugger religious-society suspense subgenre, its textured prose as seamless as the never-ending stream of prayers offered up by St. Rose Convent’s Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. In that institution, celebrated for its angelic texts, lives Sister Evangeline, who prays, tends to library matters, and has become “a creature of obedience and duty” since her father brought her there when she was 12, two years after her mother’s death. The scholar Verlaine seeks concrete evidence linking the convent to Abigail Rockefeller, and before you can say, “I found this letter,” the multilayered process of Evangeline’s transformation has begun. The story takes flight in eminently readable fashion, effortlessly folding in technical information about things angelic and the religious life. It’s hard not to enjoy the secrets unearthed and appreciate what wings are to the angels who secretly walk among us—“a symbol of their blood, their breeding, . . . their position in the community. Displaying them properly brought power and prestige.” Powerfully entertaining. --Whitney Scott

More About the Author

Danielle Trussoni was raised in La Crosse, Wisconsin and wanted to be a writer since she was six. She is the author of the Angelology series, a New York Times bestselling series published in over 32 countries, with the second installation, Angelopolis, now out in paperback. Her memoir, Falling Through the Earth, was selected as one of the Ten Best Books of 2006 by The New York Times Book Review. She is currently living in New York City. You can follow her on twitter @daniellemybella and visit her website here:
http://www.danielletrussoni.com/

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Customer Reviews

I actually really liked the book, up until the part where it didn't have an ending.
K. Weiss
It took me over two months to finish it, and my husband said, "You must hate the book, I've never seen you take so long reading one book."
Ju Young Park
The characters are intriguing, believable, and of increasing complexity as the story develops.
tachi1

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

227 of 266 people found the following review helpful By Lilly Flora VINE VOICE on March 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
For some reason "Angelology" caught my attention on this vine list. A whole secret sect dedicated to studying and protecting the world from the secret offspring of angels and man? Very cool. Add in some biblical references and ancient mythology and you got your story.

Or you should.

This novel revolves around the premise that there is a long standing organization of angelologists who study the angels and work against their hybrid children the Nephilim, who are constantly struggling to exert their superior place in the world by ruling humanity through any number of schemes. This organization has schools and institutions for teaching new recruits (from every religion and sphere of spiritual and secular life) and they do what they can to learn how to defeat the Nephilim and have been doing so for a long, long time.

Our story begins in 1999 at the New York Convent of St. Rose where Sister Evangeline, the twenty three year old orphaned daughter of two angelologists, has lived since she was twelve. Evangeline has blocked out most of the odd occurrences in her childhood but when a modern art scholar from NYC named Verlaine shows up in the convent archives (which boast a mass library of angelic images and texts) looking for information that the former Abbess of the convent was once in communication with Abigail Rockefeller it sparks her interest.

The letter she finds leads her to one of the eldest sisters in the convent, who tells the tale of her days as a young angelology student in Paris before WW2-and the expedition to the cave where the angels who fathered the Nephilim were cast down from heaven and imprisoned in to find the lyre of Orpheus-which both sides in the conflict believe has great power to aid their cause.
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138 of 166 people found the following review helpful By simone on March 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This was such a great idea. It's a shame that the book is so horribly written. Some suspension of disbelief is required for fiction, but "Angelology" requires the literary equivalent of the Brooklyn Bridge. The characters act like they're such unfathomable idiots - a secret organization studying angels uses ANGEL for its cars license plates! they have the most important of meetings in an apartment their opponents know about! someone with a Ph.D. in art history does not know that "ex" is "from" in Latin! - that it is impossible to believe that any plot they engaged in could succeed. The characters also have only emotionally matured to about the level of the average fourteen year old. Their "does s/he like me?" musings are just as boring in this book as they are in real life. Maybe some day someone will write an interesting book about interactions between humans and angels, but this sure isn't it.
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78 of 93 people found the following review helpful By B. Capossere TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I'm really trying to find something positive to say about Danielle Trussoni's Angelology, but to be honest, I really can't think of much of anything. Which means this will be a pretty quick review as I'm not much of a fan of belaboring why a bad book is a bad book (realizing of course that "bad" is pretty subjective).
Angelology is the first book in a series detailing the ongoing battle that has raged since the time of Noah between the "Nephilim" (a hybrid race of angels/humans) and humanity. The Nephilim arose when a group of angels--the Watchers--mated with human women. For this, they were imprisoned by God in a deep cavern. The Nephilim, however, remained and at first pretty much enslaved mankind, then when God wiped the Earth clean, one of them snuck aboard the Ark, allowing the race to continue, though now they dominated humanity more behind the scenes as kings and queens and aristocrats, then as the wealthy elite or politically powerful (for instance, they were behind the Nazis). Because the Nephilim, for some reason, have continued to mate with humans, they've tainted their line and are diminishing as a race and individually via sickness. Move to present time and a young nun, Sister Evangeline, who ends up involved in modern day plots by the Nephilim to cure themselves and return to domination and the Angelologists--the group of humans who have opposed them for millennia (Madame Curie, Augustine, and lots of other really famous people). Along with following Evangeline, we flash back to the 1930's and a group of Angelologists that includes Evangeline's grandmother.
The plot is excessively convoluted and often simply fails to make sense. Not in "what is happening" fashion but in the "why is this happening" way. Time and again one finds oneself saying "but wouldn't . . .
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72 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Felix Lizarraga on April 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Two very different New York Times Books reviews --one by a Janet Maudlin and another by a Suzann Cokeall-- convinced me that Angelology was, indeed, a book with an intriguing premise. I wasn't expecting His Dark Materials --indeed, books of that caliber come but once or twice in a lifetime--, but I can be very forgiving when it comes to genres like fantasy and science-fiction. I never expected my forgiveness to be so severely tested.

In the very first paragraph of the very first page (of the very first chapter), we are told that Sister Evangeline wakes up, takes her clothes to the common bathroom, and quietly dresses without looking at herself in the mirror. Second paragraph: Sister Evangeline removes her nightgown and gazes at her decidedly un-sexy underwear in the mirror. Huh? Hadn't she just dressed barely a paragraph before? Third paragraph: she puts on her clothes! And that is just the first page --of 452.

A book? This is a stinking mess. We are told that Percival Grigori's uncle was born in the seventeenth century, and that he died an untimely death "in his fifth century." I wasn't aware that five whole centuries had passed between the 1600s and the 1900s. There is a Cyrillic inscription that plays a big part in the novel, but that dates from a moment in history when the Cyrillic alphabet was barely starting to develop. The Nazis, the Nephilim, Orpheus, Darwin (apparently Darwinism was conceived by the evil Nephilim to lead the human race astray!), everything and the kitchen sink is thrown into this hodgepodge, drowning a concept that could have been interesting in oceans of incoherence.
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