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80 of 90 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They don't get much more "noir" than this one
Ever since I read Connelly's *The Black Echo*, the first of the Harry Bosch mysteries, I've been hooked on these wonderfully complex, fabulously written novels. Bosch is (predictably) "hard-boiled and melancholy, but with a heart of gold," as befits this venerable fictional genre. Yes, there are many, MANY cop/P.I. detective series out there, but in my...
Published on December 22, 2000 by Douglas A. Greenberg

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ridiculously Complex Explanation for the Central Crime
I finally slogged through this thing and I only finished because I finish 98.5% of all the books I start. It is full of chapter after chapter where absolutely nothing happens garnished with an ultimately meaningless red herring or two. The final explanation calls for such complex planning and execution with such precise detail that I would have preferred the author...
Published on May 6, 2012 by Bonner '62


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80 of 90 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They don't get much more "noir" than this one, December 22, 2000
Ever since I read Connelly's *The Black Echo*, the first of the Harry Bosch mysteries, I've been hooked on these wonderfully complex, fabulously written novels. Bosch is (predictably) "hard-boiled and melancholy, but with a heart of gold," as befits this venerable fictional genre. Yes, there are many, MANY cop/P.I. detective series out there, but in my estimation, Connelly's Bosch series is the best, and *Angels Flight* shows why.
The theme in this novel is the atmosphere of racial distrust and recriminations against the Los Angeles police that has emerged in the wake of the Rodney King cases and the O.J. Simpson trial. Connelly succeeds for the most part in capturing the tragic essence of what has been wrought by the legacy of police misconduct and the African American reaction to it in the city of angels.
Not surprisingly, he is most effective in presenting the police perspective here: the outrage and frustration at the deterioration of police credibilty in the community overall; the combination of anger and grudging admiration that a get-the-police black attorney might elicit from conscientious police professionals; the increasing disillusionment as the politicization of police affairs becomes ever more complete.
If there is a weakness in Connelly's adventuresome foray into political territory, it's related to the delicate and difficult race-related theme he has addressed here. To succeed totally in this endeavor, Connelly must navigate through some extremely tricky sociological issues, and it becomes apparent that he might be in a bit over his head in this regard. When attempting to provide the African American perspective on police presence and conduct in LA, for example, Connelly does a decent but not outstanding job. Clearly, here he is an "outsider."
This flaw is forgiveable, of course, in light of the fact that his principal task is to provide an engrossing police mystery. Here, he succeeds brilliantly, as always. Along the way, he presents a picture of contemporary society that is dark, frightening, almost hopeless. To say that this novel is "noir" is an understatement. Connelly's portrayal of human nature, contemporary police and civil politics, and the ongoing deterioration of "the California dream" in the city of angels is stunningly powerful. This is not a book that will appeal to the faint of heart.
As always, there is a thread in this novel that continues "the story" where it left off in his previous mystery in which Bosch was the protagonist. Consequently, whereas this book certainly can provide a can't-put-it-down read for those who have never read any of the previous Bosch mysteries, these books are best appreciated if they are read in chronological order, beginning with *The Black Echo*.
Currently, I've been reading Dennis Lehane and Robert Crais mysteries. These are terrific, but as I turn the pages I can't wait for the next Bosch novel to be released.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another winner from Michael Connelly, December 22, 1999
By 
Peter W. Lindsey (Coral Springs, Florida) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Connelly continues his first rate series concerning Harry Boesch and the L.A.P.D. As usual with Connelly, the plotting is tight and the story moves at a fast pace. This Boesch story is especially compelling with its focus on the Los Angeles racial tensions between Blacks and the Police. A prominent Black attorney is murdered on the eve of an important civil rights case which may seriously tarnish the reputation of the L.A.P.D. Connelly masterfully mines this fertile material for maximum impact and relevance to the current racial climate in Los Angeles. As usual, Harry Boesch is an excellent character who brings some compassion and humanity into another ugly situation. This is one of Connelly's best books.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Connelly's best novel, December 13, 2008
By 
J. Norburn (Quesnel, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have generally regarded The Concrete Blonde as the best of the Connelly catalogue, but that view has changed. Angels Flight is an exceptionally good novel. The mystery element is good but it's not what makes this a great novel. Connelly has always been good at exposing the reader to the politics of the LAPD, but never more so than in Angels Flight. There is a racially charged element to the murder in this novel that results in political maneuvering and gamesmanship that I found fascinating. The novel effectively explores issues of racism in the context of a city rocked by Rodney King and OJ Simpson.

Bosch is a character with real depth and he's given a lot to deal with in this novel. His relationship with his wife is unraveling and he doesn't understand why, a former partner is being used as a scapegoat, and his team is being used as pawns in a high stakes political game. Harry is a flawed and real human being who occasionally missteps, who questions his own judgment at times, who occasionally lets his temper get the better of him but who can also be pragmatic enough to know when he has to `go along to get along' - even when it doesn't sit well with him.

This is a well plotted novel. Admittedly, some of the plot twists are a little predictable, but this is a very entertaining police procedural elevated by Connelly's insight into the LAPD and the fully realized character of Harry Bosch. This is an intelligent, compelling page turner that is easily one of the best crime novels I have ever read.

Highly recommended.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another deep notch in Connelly's belt!, September 15, 2008
By 
Paul Weiss (Dundas, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
Howard Elias is part of the Los Angeles upper crust. As a very high profile African-American attorney and racial activist, his lucrative practice consists in large part of suing the LAPD for real, perceived or imagined civil rights infractions against the black community in LA. When he is murdered in a particularly vindictive fashion on the very eve of an important trial against four white officers, the administration of the LAPD recognizes that it has no choice but to investigate its own members and let the chips fall where they may. The case is assigned to Harry Bosch and his Hollywood homicide squad, rookie black female officer, Kiz Rider and a senior detective, Jerry Edgar, also a black officer in good standing. The political considerations behind the choice of this team to investigate the case are obvious. Bosch, Rider and Edgar, probably more through good luck than good management, have never been sued by Elias. That the squad has two black members obviously makes the choice even more politically palatable.

Michael Connelly has stepped up to the plate once again and treated us to an exciting police procedural that will thrill Harry Bosch fans to their very toes. Los Angeles is graphically portrayed as a tinder box ready to explode into a reprise of the Watts riots that took place in the aftermath of the Rodney King trial. As we've come to expect, Bosch continues to be a come-what-may investigator whose only pursuit is the truth. As Bosch's former partner, Frank Sheehan, comes under suspicion for the murder, Bosch's friendship, his loyalty and the steadfastness of his principles are tested to their limits.

This might not be the best novel that Connelly ever wrote. But I still haven't encountered the entry in the growing Harry Bosch canon that doesn't keep me flipping pages at a torrid pace. Internal departmental politics and race take centre stage in "Angel's Flight" as Bosch butts heads with the senior levels of the department, the FBI, Internal Affairs and even his own partners. Readers who have followed Bosch from the very start will also be interested in the side plot about his new wife, former FBI agent, Eleanor Wish.

Highly recommended.

Paul Weiss
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Connelly doesn't disappoint!, September 3, 2000
Angels Flight is not as good as Void Moon, but it is still a great crime novel. Connelly is your better-than-average crime/suspense novelist and he doesn't disappoint with Angels Flight.
Harry Bosch is great & the story basically is about the murder of 2 people, one being a high-profile lawyer. It is better than just your average 'whodunit' as it is still political enough to be interesting and still clever enough to keep you guessing throughout the book, with enough twists to make it believable.
After a few crappy crime/suspense novels that I have read in the last couple of days, Connelly was just the ticket to get me back into great ones again & I have just ordered all his books!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pretty close to perfect..., August 23, 2006
Angels Flight was the first Michael Connelly/Harry Bosch book that I read and when I picked it up four years ago, I realized that Connelly was no ordinary mystery writer. It took three more years to finally read the rest of this series, and since finishing them all, I wanted to go back and reread Angels Flight as I didn't remember much of what happened. Not only did I enjoy it just as much the second time around, but it remains one of my very favorite Bosch mysteries.

Howard Elias in a black civil rights lawyer who has made a name for himself suing the LAPD (this is a post Rodney King/OJ Los Angeles). One of his clients is Michael Harris, a man who was acquitted of kidnapping and murdering a young girl, Stacey Kincaid. He is now suing 15 members of the LAPD's Robbery and Homicide Division (RHD) for torturing him in trying to obtain a confession. Two days before the trial is to open, Elias is murdered. There are a whole bunch of cops who would like to see Elias dead and the citizens of LA believe a man in blue did the killing. They expect that the LAPD will close ranks and engage in a cover-up to protect their own. Tempers are raging and the city is on the verge of riots. Normally, this high profile case would fall to RHD. But since they're all suspects, it is given to Harry Bosch and his partners, Kiz Rider and Jerry Edgar. IAD and the FBI are also put on the case, which makes things more interesting and more complicated.

Bosch discovers that during the Michael Harris trial, Elias was planning to expose the real killer in the Stacey Kincaid murder. He decides to go back to square one in the Kincaid murder, believing that the killer of Kincaid and Elias are the same person. In the course of the investigation, Bosch is shocked at what he discovers--from a child pornography ring to the bad judgment of those he thought he knew and trusted. Through it all, the LAPD is trying to whitewash anything detrimental to the force.

Connelly writes with true feeling and with the knowledge of one who has lived in LA and written the crime beat there. When Kiz Rider picks up on Bosch's personal problems, Bosch muses "Her having picked up on his personal turmoil was a testament to her skill as a detective--reading people was always more important than reading clues." Also, a black lawyer attempts to explain to Bosch the reasons for the rioting in LA: "It's about hope, detective...The minority communities of Los Angeles have no power, have no money, have no voice...When you take hope away, it leaves a void. Some people fill that up with anger and violence."

The Angels Flight case does not quite play out so that all the issues are resolved. Then again, we don't live in a perfect world. But Connelly comes pretty close to perfect in writing this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Perils of "Spin", September 8, 2005
By 
J. Grattan (Lawrenceville, GA USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
In the post-Rodney King and OJ era, race is a huge factor in the affairs of the LAPD. When a vociferous police critic, black lawyer Howard Elias, is gunned down on an LA trolley, the Angel's Flight, racial tensions come to the fore. Detective Harry Bosch knows that damage control is a top priority when he is assigned to the case with his two black partners, Rider and Edgar. But his actions are constrained by the IAD and the FBI being assigned to the case, with Asst Chief Irving being apprised of every move.

Since Elias' current case involved police brutality, it is widely assumed that a cop gunned down the attorney. Bosch has to walk a tightrope in avoiding a rush to judgment and following the trail left by Elias. From a series of anonymous letters, the situation in which Bosch finds himself veers in the direction of pedophilia as the cause of a young girl's death, with ramifications for Elias.

The book moves slowly at first, with much time devoted to getting warrants and searching offices, apartments, etc. In the midst of all of this, Bosch's new wife (see Trunk Music), Eleanor, decides that she prefers a world of gambling to that of a policeman's wife. Justice is finally served, with deserved high costs to a leading LA family and not-deserved costs to a cop's family.

Bosch is his usual skeptical self, daring to question assumptions and superficialities. He is able to obtain a measure of justice for the community, while his personal affairs unravel. Another good Connelly book, but not the best.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 1st Time Reader Very Impressed, January 10, 2000
By 
I've never read a Michael Connely book before so I didn't know what to expect, but I have to say that I was very impressed with this very entertaining book. It had me guessing down to the very end,and it was filled with twists and turns you will not expect. I agree with one of the other reviewers who said the author should get rid of Eleanor (Bosch's wife) as she is the most depressing, miserable character in a work of fiction I've read this year. But, if you are looking for a very entertaining, police procedural mystery I would strongly recommend this book
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Connelly's an Excellent Writer -- Starting to be Formulaic., January 29, 1999
By A Customer
_Angels Flight_ is yet another great book from Michael Connelly. I think the thing I liked best is how his police detective hero, Harry Bosch, continues to grow and change from book to book. This was the first time I actually started to like him and could see how others might feel the same way.
Unfortunately, after reading the last three or four of Mr. Connelly's books, I'm starting to see a bit of a pattern emerge in the way he sets up a false climax each time, only to follow with one more. It worked in _Blood Work_. It worked in _Trunk Music_. It failed dismally in _The Poet_. Here, it's not so much a problem as a writing quirk that needs to be addressed, to keep the writing fresh.
That said, let me reiterate the fact that I highly recommend this book--in fact, all of Mr. Connelly's books. He continues to be one of the few writers whose books move me to get ahold of them any way I can, as quickly as I can.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Angel's Flight is A Rollercoaster Ride in LA, February 19, 2000
Another Harry Bosch novel involves us in this unusual detective who manages to perserve his essential goodness despite everything the author, Michael Connelly, can throw at him. In this novel it includes a bored wife, bad cops, horrible crimes and even greater temptations. Bosch rises above all and we rush to finsh, turning pages with frantic energy. Dialogue is sharp and the pace is great. Very satisfying.
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Angels Flight (A Harry Bosch Novel)
Angels Flight (A Harry Bosch Novel) by Michael Connelly (Mass Market Paperback - June 1, 2011)
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