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Anglican Difficulties Paperback – 2004

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 287 pages
  • Publisher: Real View Books (2004)
  • ISBN-10: 0964115018
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964115019
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,618,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Quentin D. Stewart on July 18, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In this work John Henry Newman discusses some of the curiosities of Anglicanism now that he has turned his back on it and converted to Catholicism. He points out, for instance, what a curious thing Anglicanism is - always appealing to the first five hundred years of antiquity and nothing else. Was Providence not at work for the next thousand years? Good question. Depending on how you answer the question will probably determine your religious allegiance. Newman himself answered in the affirmative and embraced the doctrinal developments of the Middle Ages, not as superstitious accretions, but as authentic and valid extensions of the early Christian Church.
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