Angry Black White Boy: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $2.17 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: used copy with general use wear, intact, fast shipping
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Angry Black White Boy: A Novel Paperback


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.83
$7.23 $0.85 $24.95

Frequently Bought Together

Angry Black White Boy: A Novel + Interpreter of Maladies
Price for both: $20.27

Buy the selected items together
  • Interpreter of Maladies $8.44

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; First Edition edition (March 8, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400054877
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400054879
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #325,016 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Adam Mansbach's cultishly popular novel about an "Angry Black White Boy" who ignites a nationwide race furor seemed an unlikely property for stage translation. But adaptor (as well as title-role player) Dan Wolf and collaborators have pulled it off. This very funny, frequently electric take on an outrageous story is billed as a "new play with live music" -- though it's no musical. Rather, it's hip-hop theater that seems destined for extended life. The book's careening parable feels like a more multiculturally aware equivalent to the literary provocations of older cult author Chuck Palahniuk, with its wild plot hooks, credibly eccentric characters and trenchant apocalyptic comedy.... ingenious street-dance-slash-mime stylized movement [and] occasional recorded snippets mesh with the cast's rapping, human beatboxing, singing and keyboarding -- all cleverly driving the narrative forward rather than overpowering it. Visual design contributions are sharp but minimal, as the dynamic four performers' multiple-role-playing, multidisciplinary talents supply all spectacle needed."
Variety

"Intersection for the Arts' new play "Angry Black White Boy," based on local author Adam Mansbach's celebrated 2005 novel, blasts through what could have been a tired debate on racial identity politics. With incredible energy and seamless staging, the show has the effect of being lost in a good book, not sitting in a theater. Adapted by and starring Dan Wolf as Macon Detornay, the angry white boy in question, the show feature members of the hip-hop collective Felonious - Myers Clark, Keith Pinto (doubling as choreographer) and Tommy Shepherd (also the composer) in alternating roles. The spare set proves to be big enough for elements of dance to intertwine with dialogue. Amazingly, the sound is controlled by the performers on stage, either through live beat-box effects or recordings. The play ends amid the confusion of who, exactly, should be apologizing to whom and for what. The issues are anything but black or white".
San Francisco Chronicle

"For all of its form crunching and boundary pushing, "Angry Black White Boy" rises or falls on the strength of its storytelling. Dan Wolf’s stage adaptation of Adam Mansbach's novel tells a fierce, funny, fascinating story that cuts to the core of what we talk about when we talk about race in this country. There’s satire and sincerity in ample supply, and this dynamic Campo Santo/Intersection for the Arts production, directed with sharp focus and experimental glee by Sean San Jose, is compelling as it is entertaining... fluid sound and movement that make the story feel like dance, poetry and music without ever detracting from the forward motion of the plot and the characters’ trajectory. The storytelling along the way crackles with energy that comes from the fusion of mostly live music – a blend of hip-hop, rap, beatbox, doo-wop, gorgeous harmonies -- and incisive movement. The excellent quartet of actors fuses sound, movement and storytelling to create a uniquely theatrical experience."
San Francisco Examiner

"
Vigorous and inviting... very entertaining. Director Sean San Jose and cast propel the action through a fluid, combustible mixture of music and movement, with sharp choreography. The cohesive, versatile ensemble and Wolf's sympathetic approach translates into an engaging theatrical hybrid, whose punctuations and rhythms carry their own share of emotional content and cultural meaning."
San Francisco Bay Guardian

"Adapted from Adam Mansbach’s hip-lit novel of the same title, the stage version doesn’t dilute the potent conversation about race, racism, and identity. In fact, I’d venture to say witnessing the Mansbach’s deeply complicated subject matter as live dialog is possibly more powerful. Featuring members of the hip-hop collective Felonious (Myers Clark, Keith Pinto and Tommy Shepherd), it’s also very lyrical in its execution, featuring and ballet-influenced choreography and stage blocking from Keith Pinto. This is a thoughtfully complicated production. The issues are muddy, the resolutions are unclear, and the show on the whole has a great sense of humor.Wolf’s play is an amazing and consistently challenging journey through one’s psyche... an extremely nuanced play."
SFist

Angry Black White Boy is bananas! Actually, it’s a banana split with razor blades in it. Adam Mansbach is the white Richard Wright, and Angry Black White Boy is our generation’s Native Son.”
—William Upski Wimsatt, author of No More Prisons

“Startling, subversive, and raucous, Angry Black White Boy is a novel about how we became who we are, and why that’s not good enough.”
—Daniel Alarcón, author of War by Candlelight

“With this brutal, hilarious, and tragic novel, Adam Mansbach proves once again he is one of the most ambitious, insightful, and daring writers of our generation.”
—Jeff Chang, author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation

Angry Black White Boy is full of hilariously twisted racial politics. Adam Mansbach is like a wigger Ishmael Reed running wild through the world of hip hop.”
—Touré, author of Soul City

“An insanely smart novel that pulls no punches . . . wild, comic, and dark.”
—Percival Everett, author of Erasure

About the Author

Adam Mansbach is the author of the novel Shackling Water and the poetry collection genius b-boy cynics getting weeded in the garden of delights.

More About the Author

Adam Mansbach's new novel, Rage is Back (Viking) has been named an Amazon.com Best Book of the Month for January 2013, and a Barnes & Noble Best Book. The Washington Post says "Mansbach has clearly had a play date with Michael Chabon and Junot Diaz, and his fresh, witty novel is one that hip readers will relish," and adds that "There's no resisting [narrator] Dondi, 'a nerd with swagger,' as he riffs on everything from Madison Avenue to yuppies' racial anxiety ," and the San Francisco Chronicle writes that "Rage Is Back does for graffiti what Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay did for comic books. Dondi mashes up disparate linguistic registers with an effortlessness that brings to mind Junot Díaz's perennial narrator, Junior. The ideal interpreter for this journey, he is equally comfortable holding forth on the history of graffiti style, explaining the "tripartite drug economy" of Fort Greene or (like many a smart high school student), bringing it all back to Homer, Plato and The Great Gatsby. ...but beneath all the weed and spray paint, it's a warmhearted story about a son searching for his father and for himself, a trip through the past and present of an American art form that fits surprisingly well within the confines of the novel."

Mansbach's previous book, Go the F*ck to Sleep is a #1 New York Times bestseller, and one of the most talked-about books of the decade. A viral sensation that shot to #1 on Amazon.com months before the book was even available, it has been published in forty languages, and is forthcoming as a feature film from Fox 2000. Mansbach also wrote"Wake the F*ck Up," a pro-Obama video starring Samuel L. Jackson that has been described by many as the greatest political ad of all time. Released online on September 27, 2012, it received 5 million views in its first week.

Mansbach's 2008 novel, The End of the Jews, won the California Book Award and was long-listed for the IMPAC-Dublin Prize. His previous novel, Angry Black White Boy, or The Miscegenation of Macon Detornay, was a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2005; it is taught at more than eighty universities and has been adapted into a prize-winning stage play. He is also the author of the novel Shackling Water, the poetry collection genius b-boy cynics getting weeded in the garden of delights, the graphic novel Nature of the Beast (co-written with Douglas Mcgowan).

An inaugural recipient of the Ford Foundation's Future Aesthetics Artist Grant, Mansbach was also a 2012 Sundance Institute Screenwriting Lab fellow and the recipient of the Indian Paintbrush/Sundance Institute Feature Filmwriting Grant. The 2009-2011 New Voices Professor of Fiction at Rutgers University, he founded, edited and published the pioneering 1990s hip hop journal Elementary and spent several years traveling as a drum technician with the Elvin Jones Jazz Machine. His fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, Esquire, The Believer, and on National Public Radio's All Things Considered.

Mansbach's His debut thriller, The Dead Run will be published in September 2013, by HarperCollins. A frequent lecturer on college campuses across the country, Mansbach lives in Berkeley, California, where he co-hosts the KPFA/Pacifica radio show "Father Figures."

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
1
See all 18 customer reviews
Please read it.
M. Ginsburg
The writing was unpredictable and almost improvisational, and it fit the plot of this story without overshadowing the central themes and characters.
The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers
And what a great message--that whites need to wake up, especially white liberals.
Fred Zappa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Richard P. Carpenter on March 29, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rare is the novel that tackles the serious business of black-white relationships and yet is a damn good read. "Angry Black White Boy'' by Adam Mansbach is such a book. The prose is lyrical, the topic is timely, the humor is abundant, and the plot is riveting. Macon Detornay is a young white man with a love of hip-hop, and something a lot stronger than sympathy for the black cause. He quickly goes from robbing smug and bigoted white men to becoming a media superstar who calls upon whites to begin righting wrongs during a National Day of Apology. What happens on that day? Probably not what you're expecting ... not entirely anyway. This is a highly cinematic story -- I can see a movie in its future -- that thankfully lacks preachiness or one-sidedness: Mansbach is an equal-opportunity mocker. You may not like everything this book has to say, but you won't regret reading it.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers on April 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
Decades after the Sugar Hill gang burst onto the scene with "Rapper's Delight," the proliferation of hip-hop moves forward at a steady pace. ANGRY BLACK WHITE BOY is a chronicle of the effects hip-hop has had on America, racial politics, suburban youth, and Macon Detornay as he enters his freshman year at Columbia University.

Macon is a man on a mission to be known as "the downest white boy." For years, he has paid his dues to Black culture and Black folks, earning respect in most circles with his lay-it-on-the-line speeches, innovative poetry, and his hatred for "the man." Nevertheless, Macon isn't content to just be down. He smells a revolution brewing, and he is at its forefront - accidentally on purpose.

Mansbach's story enraptured me with its humor, lilt, and permutation of racial biases, issues, and scope. By creating a character who was totally different from, and almost antithetic to, any other I had ever read about, Mansbach won me over and held me captive in a story I had yet to hear. The writing was unpredictable and almost improvisational, and it fit the plot of this story without overshadowing the central themes and characters. ANGRY BLACK WHITE BOY gleams with brilliance, and I will never forget it. (RAW Rating: 4.5)

Reviewed by CandaceK

of The RAWSISTAZ™ Reviewers
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By J. Mischel on October 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading Angry Black White Boy. It seemed like a good premise, but could have been a lot better. The writing style is so poor, with such tenuous logic, that any points that the author makes about racism are weakened. The characters are two-dimensional and don't behave like real people. They just serve to move the plot from point A to point B. So many of the characters are thin stereotypes that the overall message is diluted. The main character, named Macon, is the "downest" white guy ever. He seems to be an embarrassing alter-ego for the author (who has some hip-hop album reviews on his web site if you want a sample his writing style). Macon is not exactly a hero, but something of an Eminem among black political leaders. Macon's political message is somewhat ambivalent, and it's easy to lose interest in his character halfway through. The ending is ridiculous and ruins the story. Mansbach's overall writing style can be downright embarrassing. He's overly earnest in his attempt at hipness. He often uses bad poetry slam writing full of paens to hip-hop, with cringe-inducing use of words like "pimpstrut" as a verb. The book also includes fictional segments from the memoir of an early negro baseball player, but they're written in a revisionist style that's way out of touch with the writing of that time. It's another fatal error that prevents the book from ringing true. I wanted to like this book, and found some of the observations on racial identity to be very acute, but overall it just doesn't work - not even as a criticism of white people trying to adopt black culture. A writer like Gore Vidal, for example, can write about controversial subjects like this with absurdity and insight, but Adam Mansbach just doesn't succeed. For a better book on racism, skip Angry Black White Boy and just read Richard Wright's book Black Boy instead (or any other classic works on racism from authors who actually know what they're talking about, unlike Mr. Mansbach).
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Fred Zappa on December 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
Mansbach's writing style here repeatedly took my breath away. He writes like firecrackers. Well, okay, bad comparison, since I can't write like him. His central character also writes and thinks in an eye-popping hip hop style, and he works great as a protagonist for me. This book gets compared to Native Son a lot, but I think the satire of Invisible Man is the better comparison. Anyone who thinks anything in this book isn't "realistic" is either unhip to how satire works or intent on ignoring the book's message. And what a great message--that whites need to wake up, especially white liberals.

The novel's staging of a national Day of Apology by whites seems at first like something this very white-aware author would approve of, but then he goes on to show why such a day wouldn't actually work: because most whites are so clueless about what their race has to apologize for. There still has to be a whole ton of education going on before such an apology is even worth voicing, let alone accepting. The Times ran a condescending review when this novel came out, accusing the author of using lazy, cliched slang. What a bad reader! I think The Times just didn't want to receive and repeat the author's message, or else just couldn't hear it.

Overall, great novel! Though I have to agree with reviewers below that the author seemed a little bewildered about how to end it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa4e21288)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?